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4K TV with HDRunder £600

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Looking for one, is it possible? Needs to be 50" or bigger. I ask here because I see plenty of Tvs priced well but don't mention HDR and when they do they lack the 8 or 10bit info. Read More
Matty8787 Avatar
5m, 3w agoPosted 5 months, 3 weeks ago
Looking for one, is it possible?

Needs to be 50" or bigger.

I ask here because I see plenty of Tvs priced well but don't mention HDR and when they do they lack the 8 or 10bit info.
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Matty8787 Avatar
5m, 3w agoPosted 5 months, 3 weeks ago
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Best Answer
HDR involves different technologies, some of which like brighter backlights can be supported to different degrees. It's like 4K where a TV is either has it or doesn't.

The most basic support is the ability to take in an HDR signal and adjust the brightness of the backlight, TVs have been doing that for years and the only difference here if that it's controlled by the content instead of the TV.

Above that you've got a wide gamut backlight. This means the TV have access to some more saturated colours than it did before. They're only used in HDR content but you could say this is the starting point for real HDR support. The eventual target is 100% coverage of the Rec. 2020 colour gamut but TVs are generally only at 60-70% at the moment. Standard TVs cover 50% or Rec. 709.

This starts to appear around £550-650 at 49/50" so doable witin budget. Have a look at the Samsung KU6400, Sony XD80, LG UH770V, Hisense M7000 (55"+) and Panasonic DX700.

(technically the LG's 630-750 models and Hisense M5500 also qualify but the former doesn't extend the colour range much and the latter has much lower peak brightness than the other HDR TVs in that price).

Above that you've got higher brightness ranges and the ability to dim sections of the backlight individually to provide greater contrast between the dark and light areas of the screen. Samsung's KS7000 is generally reckoned to be the cheapest TV on the next level up and runs to £850 at the moment.

EDIT: Oh and ignore the 8-bit vs. 10-bit debate, it's only a very minor component and overshadowed by much bigger differences

Edited By: EndlessWaves on Dec 29, 2016 18:37

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#2
look around as I think know you'll get it slightly cheaper
#3
HDR involves different technologies, some of which like brighter backlights can be supported to different degrees. It's like 4K where a TV is either has it or doesn't.

The most basic support is the ability to take in an HDR signal and adjust the brightness of the backlight, TVs have been doing that for years and the only difference here if that it's controlled by the content instead of the TV.

Above that you've got a wide gamut backlight. This means the TV have access to some more saturated colours than it did before. They're only used in HDR content but you could say this is the starting point for real HDR support. The eventual target is 100% coverage of the Rec. 2020 colour gamut but TVs are generally only at 60-70% at the moment. Standard TVs cover 50% or Rec. 709.

This starts to appear around £550-650 at 49/50" so doable witin budget. Have a look at the Samsung KU6400, Sony XD80, LG UH770V, Hisense M7000 (55"+) and Panasonic DX700.

(technically the LG's 630-750 models and Hisense M5500 also qualify but the former doesn't extend the colour range much and the latter has much lower peak brightness than the other HDR TVs in that price).

Above that you've got higher brightness ranges and the ability to dim sections of the backlight individually to provide greater contrast between the dark and light areas of the screen. Samsung's KS7000 is generally reckoned to be the cheapest TV on the next level up and runs to £850 at the moment.

EDIT: Oh and ignore the 8-bit vs. 10-bit debate, it's only a very minor component and overshadowed by much bigger differences

Edited By: EndlessWaves on Dec 29, 2016 18:37
#4
EndlessWaves
HDR involves different technologies, some of which like brighter backlights can be supported to different degrees. It's like 4K where a TV is either has it or doesn't.
The most basic support is the ability to take in an HDR signal and adjust the brightness of the backlight, TVs have been doing that for years and the only difference here if that it's controlled by the content instead of the TV.
Above that you've got a wide gamut backlight. This means the TV have access to some more saturated colours than it did before. They're only used in HDR content but you could say this is the starting point for real HDR support. The eventual target is 100% coverage of the Rec. 2020 colour gamut but TVs are generally only at 60-70% at the moment. Standard TVs cover 50% or Rec. 709.
This starts to appear around £550-650 at 49/50" so doable witin budget. Have a look at the Samsung KU6400, Sony XD80, LG UH770V, Hisense M7000 (55"+) and Panasonic DX700.
(technically the LG's 630-750 models and Hisense M5500 also qualify but the former doesn't extend the colour range much and the latter has much lower peak brightness than the other HDR TVs in that price).
Above that you've got higher brightness ranges and the ability to dim sections of the backlight individually to provide greater contrast between the dark and light areas of the screen. Samsung's KS7000 is generally reckoned to be the cheapest TV on the next level up and runs to £850 at the moment.
EDIT: Oh and ignore the 8-bit vs. 10-bit debate, it's only a very minor component and overshadowed by much bigger differences

Great info! Cheers.

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