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7 seat car ( new or nearly new) any suggestions? £20,000.00

£20000.00 @ Seat
I am planning buy a 7 seats car which has 2 rear seats can folding into boots. My budget is about £20,000. We have 5 people in the family. This car will be doing school trips , shoppings, and family …
Fi73 Avatar
1m, 2w agoPosted 1 month, 2 weeks ago
I am planning buy a 7 seats car which has 2 rear seats can folding into boots. My budget is about £20,000. We have 5 people in the family. This car will be doing school trips , shoppings, and family trips. Any owner can give any suggestions? brand? model? Thanks.

Thanks everyone for lovely advises. I have got the hunting list ready.
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Fi73 Avatar
1m, 2w agoPosted 1 month, 2 weeks ago
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#1
we are just about to take ownership of a BMW series 2 grand tourer. excellent equip and doesn't look like a wagon!! Reckon you may find a 'nearly' new one for the price you mentioned.
#2
Have a look at the Mitsubishi Outlander, I personally dont like the rear seats, but I cannot fault the reliability of my Grandis; 8 years old and never had a fault, not even a bulb change.

Unless you are super rich, buy nearly new; my last two cars were both bought at 12-18 months old for between 30-40% off of new price.

Also, for short journeys - buy Petrol, DPF's get clogged in diesel engines if you dont warm the engine properly, so unless you are doing a continuous 20 mile journey at least once per week, it can cause big garage bills.
#3
Ford galaxy or Ford s- max my husband is in car sales and he said these are the one for you as it tick's all your requirements
#4
Try a Skoda Yeti, around £20k new (some cheaper models), price likely to drop later in year, due to new SUV model coming out.
#5
Citroen C4 Grand Picasso - for 20k you should be able to get nearly new and they have decent petrol engines now if it's only being used for short trips
#6
As mentioned above, if you're doing mostly short trips, get one with petrol engine.
In no order:
Ford S Max, BMW 2 Series, Mitsubishi Outlander, VW Touran.
#7
I would go for Seat Alhambra excellent car
#8
XC90 if you was 4x4 too
#9
Look on Motor point Citroen c4 vtr+ spec or above
#10
I was also looking recently. I needed a petrol model as I do low mileage.
There is not many petrol models out there. Any I did find seemed underpowered for the weight of the car.
If your happy with a diesel it will be a lot easier. Your budget will also give more options.
With 2 adults, 3 kids, car seats and buggies you need the car to have a little power. Some of these 1.6-2 litre petrol 7 seat cars are so slow at pulling off.
Test drive any car thoroughly.
#11
Try a mercedes R class. Loads of room and the dpf in the diesel self regenerates so fine for shirt trios too. They don't make them new for this country anymore, but can get a 13 plate.
#12
daddycool1974
we are just about to take ownership of a BMW series 2 grand tourer. excellent equip and doesn't look like a wagon!! Reckon you may find a 'nearly' new one for the price you mentioned.


​we have the 5 seat model, great car. friends have the 7 seat 2 series and they love it. great quality, residuals, performance. I paid £500 for 3 years of services or was it 5?
#13
dothedealnow
daddycool1974
we are just about to take ownership of a BMW series 2 grand tourer. excellent equip and doesn't look like a wagon!! Reckon you may find a 'nearly' new one for the price you mentioned.
​we have the 5 seat model, great car. friends have the 7 seat 2 series and they love it. great quality, residuals, performance. I paid £500 for 3 years of services or was it 5?

It's normally 5 years or 50,000 miles for £500.00
#14
Ford s max, see if you can get a "ticket"
#15
S Max or Galaxy, Simply the best of them all, Touran, Alhambra and Sharan are ok too but not as nice or as nice to drive as S Max/Galaxy.

Zafira is ok too but a made of cheap plastic and not as nice to drive.

C4 looks nice but it's a heap of crap that will constantly breakdown, Often gearbox faults etc.. Best avoided.

Petrols are best for short journeys.
#16
dwain
dothedealnow
daddycool1974
we are just about to take ownership of a BMW series 2 grand tourer. excellent equip and doesn't look like a wagon!! Reckon you may find a 'nearly' new one for the price you mentioned.
​we have the 5 seat model, great car. friends have the 7 seat 2 series and they love it. great quality, residuals, performance. I paid £500 for 3 years of services or was it 5?
It's normally 5 years or 50,000 miles for £500.00
Bmw have just changed their service packs at start of the year. Now 3 years or 36k miles. (The pack will be cheaper to buy now though than £500.) Apparently the reason being people are changing their cars more often. The cynic in me would say it's more because they were losing out! If pack was bought pre January then it will be 5 years or 50k miles. One other thing to be aware of: if you buy a second hand one and it has no service pack and hasn't had its first service yet you can still buy the service pack. It usually works out cheaper than paying for the services separately.


Edited By: 2pacslilhomie on Jan 07, 2017 08:53
#17
I would have thought the X Trail would be a good option. The 2nd row of seats slides backwards and forwards to give more or less room to the third row as required.

Well built, good interior and thoroughly well thought out.

Honestly if its used and you want to keep it for a while and enjoy low running costs. If you don't want to be hypocrite outside a school gassing your kids with NOx while you wave goodbye then "Prius Plus" is probably the idea option!

Things like the Galaxy have fallen from favour of over recent years. Spacious, capable, but now the trade mark of firms like Addison Lee seem to have dented there image.

Edited By: groenleader on Jan 07, 2017 08:56
#18
I would opt for the volvo xc90
#19
Just my tuppence worth.... had an 2.2 tdci S max titanium x sport before. Absolutely brilliant car. It was an ex ford fleet car and was well spec'd including pan roof, reverse camera, touch screen nav etc. Car was an absolute joy to get into everyday and kids loved it. It was in silver and was always commented on. Sounds good so far right??? As pointed out by others the dpf (diesel particulate filter- too long winded to go into here, but seriously read up on it before any purchase!!!) ended up the cause of me getting rid of it! The dealer said I wasn't travelling enough miles to warrant a diesel. I was covering 14k mile a year including 4 motorway runs a month. I ended up cutting my losses after 11 months of ownership and 6 visits to the dealership, during which it had spent a total of 4 weeks off the road. I bought a petrol a4 avant after. I eventually ventured back to diesels- a4 2.0tdi, a6 2.0tdi and 435d (yes I change my cars as often as my undergarments!) no problems with any of these cars despite driving the cars for the same mileage and in the same manner. I honestly think the S max was a Friday car. However, the real reason behind my story is to make sure you need a diesel rather than a petrol because it really can ruin what was a really great 'relationship' with your car!

Edited By: 2pacslilhomie on Jan 07, 2017 09:06
#20
Dpf faults will occur on most diesel cars if you're not doing the mileage, must include plenty of out of town driving too. Some do have better dpf systems but they can all suffer if you don't do the mileage.

For Ford diesels you can buy a relatively cheap diagnostics cable and use forscan diagnostics to do a static forced dpf regeneration. Do that every few weeks and it should be fine.

Edited By: shauneco on Jan 07, 2017 09:27: more info added
#21
shauneco
Dpf faults will occur on most diesel cars if you're not doing the mileage, must include plenty of out of town driving too. Some do have better dpf systems but they can all suffer if you don't do the mileage.

Its actually less to do with mileage and more to do with how long the run is. You need to get the DPF up to temperature to clean itself through, most will only dump at speeds of 40+ MPH.

An example would be, if you drove 80 miles in one hit from your home to an airport parked your diesel and came back 5 days later and did a near enough nonstop return journey, every week for a 47 weeks of the year you would perfectly fine even with some low mileage jobs in between.

However, 160 miles a week in a congested town and city driving will leave you with little opportunity to have the DPF dump/clean.

To a certain extent its not really how many miles, its how you drive those miles that will make the difference.
#22
groenleader
shauneco
Dpf faults will occur on most diesel cars if you're not doing the mileage, must include plenty of out of town driving too. Some do have better dpf systems but they can all suffer if you don't do the mileage.
Its actually less to do with mileage and more to do with how long the run is. You need to get the DPF up to temperature to clean itself through, most will only dump at speeds of 40+ MPH.
An example would be, if you drove 80 miles in one hit from your home to an airport parked your diesel and came back 5 days later and did a near enough nonstop return journey, every week for a 47 weeks of the year you would perfectly fine even with some low mileage jobs in between.
However, 160 miles a week in a congested town and city driving will leave you with little opportunity to have the DPF dump/clean.
To a certain extent its not really how many miles, its how you drive those miles that will make the difference.
Yeah, Hence why I stated lots of out of town driving ;), That is a rare scenario lots of long 50+mph journeys would be ok. Lots of people go to there local shops and back which is very bad for dpf system. But people buy them thinking but "I'll get 60mpg".

Edited By: shauneco on Jan 07, 2017 09:38
#23
shauneco
S Max or Galaxy, Simply the best of them all, Touran, Alhambra and Sharan are ok too but not as nice or as nice to drive as S Max/Galaxy.

Zafira is ok too but a made of cheap plastic and not as nice to drive.

C4 looks nice but it's a heap of crap that will constantly breakdown, Often gearbox faults etc.. Best avoided.

Petrols are best for short journeys.


​Get the 2 Series Grand Tourer, far better than that junk!
#24
dwain
dothedealnow
daddycool1974
we are just about to take ownership of a BMW series 2 grand tourer. excellent equip and doesn't look like a wagon!! Reckon you may find a 'nearly' new one for the price you mentioned.
​we have the 5 seat model, great car. friends have the 7 seat 2 series and they love it. great quality, residuals, performance. I paid £500 for 3 years of services or was it 5?

It's normally 5 years or 50,000 miles for £500.00


​Thanks for the clarification. I must have got £590 for 50K, 5 years. Excellent.
#25
everyone stating dpf issues is correct,but dont forget the EGR valve aswell . another part that can cost hundreds to replace . hate modern engines !!!!!!!
#26
We've had Nissan X-trail for last 18months and can't fault it.

Fully loaded with satnav, parking sensors, privacy glass, electric tailgate, etc even on the middle of the range
We have 1600cc diesel and get 48mpg avg. We have 5 kids so it's often full and it's still got more than enough power which amazed me to overtake easily enough when needed which I was concerned that it would be too sluggish.
It looks good in my opinion as it looks more SUV than people carrier which also means you have a higher driver seating position which I like from a safety point of view as gives ability to look ahead of the vehicle and possible over the vehicles in front more. Plus pricing on PCH if you don't want to purchase outright are a bargain IMO circa £300p/m incl for middle range option

It's on PCH for 2 years and I've been looking at what other options there are to change too and keep being drawn back to the X-trail
#27
what about a toyota corolla verso or a honda 7 seater petrol and get it concverted to lpg costs inder 1k for the conversion and should give ur money back after about 15000/20000 miles and be cheaper to run than diesel after that for equivalent car.
#28
Gentle_Giant
Have a look at the Mitsubishi Outlander, I personally dont like the rear seats, but I cannot fault the reliability of my Grandis; 8 years old and never had a fault, not even a bulb change.

Unless you are super rich, buy nearly new; my last two cars were both bought at 12-18 months old for between 30-40% off of new price.

Also, for short journeys - buy Petrol, DPF's get clogged in diesel engines if you dont warm the engine properly, so unless you are doing a continuous 20 mile journey at least once per week, it can cause big garage bills.


​Do these DPF cleaner fluids work
Got a 7 seater galaxy diesel. The dpf is a bloody nightmare.
#29
shauneco
Dpf faults will occur on most diesel cars if you're not doing the mileage, must include plenty of out of town driving too. Some do have better dpf systems but they can all suffer if you don't do the mileage.

For Ford diesels you can buy a relatively cheap diagnostics cable and use forscan diagnostics to do a static forced dpf regeneration. Do that every few weeks and it should be fine.


​Where do I buy that from shaun?
#30
@Fi73: What age are the people sitting in the back? If you need a car that's comfortable for three adults or near-adults to sit abreast then it rules out many of the smaller cars mentioned in this thread. You're mainly looking at the big MPVs (Sharan/Alhambra, Galaxy/S-max and stuff like the Tourneos) and maybe some of the less bulgy large 4x4s.

2pacslilhomie
However, the real reason behind my story is to make sure you need a diesel rather than a petrol because it really can ruin what was a really great 'relationship' with your car!

Sounds more like you simply got bitten by first generation technology, and subsequent improved versions work perfectly well.

A lot of the DPF horror stories are with first generation systems.

I wouldn't worry about it on a more modern car unless you are doing an unusually high percentage of low speed trips

muddassarsardar
what about a toyota corolla verso or a honda 7 seater petrol and get it concverted to lpg costs inder 1k for the conversion and should give ur money back after about 15000/20000 miles and be cheaper to run than diesel after that for equivalent car.

The Corolla Verso hasn't been made since 2009.

The CR-V does 55mpg diesel, 33mpg petrol. An engine converted to LPG uses some petrol as well, and gets lower efficiency than running purely on petrol.

LPG costs around half as much as diesel, so you'd have to be getting more than 27mpg equivalent for the conversion to pay for itself. Given the facts above that seems unlikely.

If we look at the new Verso then that's 63mpg diesel, 42mpg petrol. That might work out slightly cheaper long term if you convert but there won't be much in it.

Gentle_Giant
Unless you are super rich, buy nearly new; my last two cars were both bought at 12-18 months old for between 30-40% off of new price.

List price maybe, but discounts on a new car these days are so easy to get with plenty of broker/dealer websites offering the service even if you don't want to negotiate yourself. There's a comparison site to give some idea of pricing here:
http://www.honestjohn.co.uk/cars-for-sale/#newSearch
(click on New Cars).

A nearly new car is often only a small saving over the best price you can get on a new car so while it's still a saving, I certainly wouldn't rule out brand new.
#31
groenleader
shauneco
Dpf faults will occur on most diesel cars if you're not doing the mileage, must include plenty of out of town driving too. Some do have better dpf systems but they can all suffer if you don't do the mileage.

Its actually less to do with mileage and more to do with how long the run is. You need to get the DPF up to temperature to clean itself through, most will only dump at speeds of 40+ MPH.

An example would be, if you drove 80 miles in one hit from your home to an airport parked your diesel and came back 5 days later and did a near enough nonstop return journey, every week for a 47 weeks of the year you would perfectly fine even with some low mileage jobs in between.

However, 160 miles a week in a congested town and city driving will leave you with little opportunity to have the DPF dump/clean.

To a certain extent its not really how many miles, its how you drive those miles that will make the difference.


​Any recommendations on dpf issues if I'm not going to be doing lots of motorway miles. Probably twice a week, two 60 mile journeys in a week? Enough for the dpf to clear itself?

Is dpf a general diesel issue or more specifically we Ford diesel cars?
#32
EN1GMA
groenleader
shauneco
Dpf faults will occur on most diesel cars if you're not doing the mileage, must include plenty of out of town driving too. Some do have better dpf systems but they can all suffer if you don't do the mileage.
Its actually less to do with mileage and more to do with how long the run is. You need to get the DPF up to temperature to clean itself through, most will only dump at speeds of 40+ MPH.
An example would be, if you drove 80 miles in one hit from your home to an airport parked your diesel and came back 5 days later and did a near enough nonstop return journey, every week for a 47 weeks of the year you would perfectly fine even with some low mileage jobs in between.
However, 160 miles a week in a congested town and city driving will leave you with little opportunity to have the DPF dump/clean.
To a certain extent its not really how many miles, its how you drive those miles that will make the difference.
​Any recommendations on dpf issues if I'm not going to be doing lots of motorway miles. Probably twice a week, two 60 mile journeys in a week? Enough for the dpf to clear itself?

That's more than enough.
#33
I'm seriously thinking of selling my galaxy at this rate. 07 galaxy, done 90,000 on the clock. I'll have to see what they go for.
#34
EN1GMA
I'm seriously thinking of selling my galaxy at this rate. 07 galaxy, done 90,000 on the clock. I'll have to see what they go for.

A galaxy s7 is about £400 :-p
#35
EN1GMA
shauneco
Dpf faults will occur on most diesel cars if you're not doing the mileage, must include plenty of out of town driving too. Some do have better dpf systems but they can all suffer if you don't do the mileage.
For Ford diesels you can buy a relatively cheap diagnostics cable and use forscan diagnostics to do a static forced dpf regeneration. Do that every few weeks and it should be fine.
​Where do I buy that from shaun?
I replied to your pm the other day and provided a link ;).

Anyway here is an example on Ebay
#36
EN1GMA
groenleader
shauneco
Dpf faults will occur on most diesel cars if you're not doing the mileage, must include plenty of out of town driving too. Some do have better dpf systems but they can all suffer if you don't do the mileage.
Its actually less to do with mileage and more to do with how long the run is. You need to get the DPF up to temperature to clean itself through, most will only dump at speeds of 40+ MPH.

An example would be, if you drove 80 miles in one hit from your home to an airport parked your diesel and came back 5 days later and did a near enough nonstop return journey, every week for a 47 weeks of the year you would perfectly fine even with some low mileage jobs in between.

However, 160 miles a week in a congested town and city driving will leave you with little opportunity to have the DPF dump/clean.

To a certain extent its not really how many miles, its how you drive those miles that will make the difference.

​Any recommendations on dpf issues if I'm not going to be doing lots of motorway miles. Probably twice a week, two 60 mile journeys in a week? Enough for the dpf to clear itself?

Is dpf a general diesel issue or more specifically we Ford diesel cars?

Perhaps your dpf is so clogged up it's not cleaned as well as it should do, The Ford dpf system is no worse than others from a similar period. Have the dpf hollowed out and remapped and all your problems will go away. But you can use Forscan and a cheap cable to force regen. Not only that it will bring any stored fault codes up, You can also use it for live data etc..
#37
EN1GMA
I'm seriously thinking of selling my galaxy at this rate. 07 galaxy, done 90,000 on the clock. I'll have to see what they go for.

£4k
#38
EndlessWaves
@Fi73: What age are the people sitting in the back? If you need a car that's comfortable for three adults or near-adults to sit abreast then it rules out many of the smaller cars mentioned in this thread. You're mainly looking at the big MPVs (Sharan/Alhambra, Galaxy/S-max and stuff like the Tourneos) and maybe some of the less bulgy large 4x4s.

2pacslilhomie
However, the real reason behind my story is to make sure you need a diesel rather than a petrol because it really can ruin what was a really great 'relationship' with your car!

Sounds more like you simply got bitten by first generation technology, and subsequent improved versions work perfectly well.

A lot of the DPF horror stories are with first generation systems.

I wouldn't worry about it on a more modern car unless you are doing an unusually high percentage of low speed trips

muddassarsardar
what about a toyota corolla verso or a honda 7 seater petrol and get it concverted to lpg costs inder 1k for the conversion and should give ur money back after about 15000/20000 miles and be cheaper to run than diesel after that for equivalent car.

The Corolla Verso hasn't been made since 2009.

The CR-V does 55mpg diesel, 33mpg petrol. An engine converted to LPG uses some petrol as well, and gets lower efficiency than running purely on petrol.

LPG costs around half as much as diesel, so you'd have to be getting more than 27mpg equivalent for the conversion to pay for itself. Given the facts above that seems unlikely.

If we look at the new Verso then that's 63mpg diesel, 42mpg petrol. That might work out slightly cheaper long term if you convert but there won't be much in it.

Gentle_Giant
Unless you are super rich, buy nearly new; my last two cars were both bought at 12-18 months old for between 30-40% off of new price.

List price maybe, but discounts on a new car these days are so easy to get with plenty of broker/dealer websites offering the service even if you don't want to negotiate yourself. There's a comparison site to give some idea of pricing here:
http://www.honestjohn.co.uk/cars-for-sale/#newSearch
(click on New Cars).

A nearly new car is often only a small saving over the best price you can get on a new car so while it's still a saving, I certainly wouldn't rule out brand new.


​ok its basically the same car verso and corolla verso but from real life experience I have a verso 2006 petrol and a friend has a diesel his returns locally around 35 mpg and mine about 24mpg thats inclduing (lpg and petrol)so I assumed these figures that manufacturers use are quite a way off actual figures if that's still happening with cars I think lpg would work out better plus his 2.0 diesel is pretty sluggish compared to the 1.8 petrol version so local to me lpg is 44p petrol 115p and diesel 118p so works out better. petrol in summer is used for about 0.5 to 0.6 miles in winter it's a bit more around 0.8 miles to 1.2 miles in the mornings depending how cold it is and then again if u stop car for more than 4/5 hours.
#39
Zafira Tourer here, its drive is a million times better than the previous Zafira.. with a pretty economical 2.0 litre engine and it pulls brilliantly, a bit clunky in low gears but great higher up. Its generous in the back seats with 60/40 although not as good as Alhambra or C4, but i find its the most comfortable car I have even sat in..

only thing is on the MK1 Zafira Tourer the headlights are plain dangerous and light up pretty much nothing, i believe this is fixed in the new facelift MKII.

Also have a look at the new Skoda Kodiaq coming soon, looks interesting.

Edited By: haritori on Jan 07, 2017 19:30
#40
There is a fair bit of misinformation about DPF in here.

1/ ALL DPF fitted cars have a "Regeneration System".

2/ The early cars did have bigger issues, but the fixes were entirely software.

3/ The DPF regen system can generate its own heat, so slow speed town driving isnt an issue on its own.

The problem is short journey times, a regen cycle takes a certain amount of time, to heat the DPF up once the engine is warm, and then to run the cycle; most town driving isnt long enough to complete this cycle, especially in bigger engines; my old 2.4L Toyota took 20 minutes of fairly vigorous driving just to get the engine to near normal operating temp (not the water gauge temp, the engine temp).

Enough cycles interrupted, and the DPF clogs up; de-coring might get the car working, but it is doubtful it will pass many emissions tests before total failure.

If you dont do AT LEAST one continuous 30 minute drive a week, and/or; unless you are VERY careful to let the car sit and finish a regen cycle before switching it off; you are going to get a clogged DPF sooner rather than later.

(Might need a bit less with a smaller engine, will need perhaps an hour for a 4+ Litre engine)

And the only certain fix for a clogged DPF is a NEW DPF.

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