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Is a 20kg mountain bike too heavy?

thegamingkinginfo Avatar
2y, 4m agoPosted 2 years, 4 months ago
Is it too heavy, going mainly on flat road and a little bit of uphill.
thegamingkinginfo Avatar
2y, 4m agoPosted 2 years, 4 months ago
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#1
My advice is to get the lightest you can afford - even if it a second hand bike as they are relatively cheap. 20kg is ok ....ish but i use a 12kg Brompton and it wizzes along and a Boardman hibrid road bike at about 13- 14 kg. You notice it particularly when cycling into wind ,uphill and carrying the thing over obstacles or onto trains etc
#2
Depends on you, really. How strong a rider are you?
I would say that 20kg is (very) heavy. My own MTB is about 11kg, but it's a hardtail and pretty high spec.
#3
That seems very heavy, like one of those horrible full suspension things out of the likes of Tesco.

Are you not better off getting some form of Hybrid because if you're just using it (mainly) on roads what is the benefit of MTB other than making you go slower with its fat tyres?
banned#4
around 5-6kg heavier than most cheap bikes but don't forget its your weight + weight of bike you have to move when pedalling so the knobbly tyres will probably slow you down more than the weight of the bike

Edited By: whatsThePoint on Jul 26, 2014 08:14: .
#5
thats way too heavy, it must be a cheap nasty sub £100 bike. dont buy it. you will get fed up way before you start to enjoy mountain biking or getting fit. if thats all ou can afford look around for a better second hand bike on flee bay or your local for sale pages on facebook.
banned#6
winter_zombie
thats way too heavy, it must be a cheap nasty sub £100 bike. dont buy it. you will get fed up way before you start to enjoy mountain biking or getting fit. if thats all ou can afford look around for a better second hand bike on flee bay or your local for sale pages on facebook.

are you saying the 1000s of 15kg+ bikes that get sold every year are never used?
#7
whatsThePoint
winter_zombie
thats way too heavy, it must be a cheap nasty sub £100 bike. dont buy it. you will get fed up way before you start to enjoy mountain biking or getting fit. if thats all ou can afford look around for a better second hand bike on flee bay or your local for sale pages on facebook.

are you saying the 1000s of 15kg+ bikes that get sold every year are never used?
they get used for going to the shop and back LoL.
banned#8
winter_zombie
whatsThePoint
winter_zombie
thats way too heavy, it must be a cheap nasty sub £100 bike. dont buy it. you will get fed up way before you start to enjoy mountain biking or getting fit. if thats all ou can afford look around for a better second hand bike on flee bay or your local for sale pages on facebook.

are you saying the 1000s of 15kg+ bikes that get sold every year are never used?
they get used for going to the shop and back LoL.

that's all some people want a bike for, so I take that as a recommendation (_;)
#9
Sadly the pro cycle brigade have commented and expect every cyclist to spend £700 before it's called a bike and anything less than £100 is a BSO (bike shaped object)

The OP hasn't included in his question

How far he will travel?
Is it road or track surface?
How often he will cycle?
How old and how fit he is?
etc etc

Is a 20kg bike to heavy for flats and a bit uphill? for the pro cyclist brigade, dressed in their club coloured lycra on their also club coloured part carbon part kissed part licked male member extension then of course it's going to be too heavy

If you a man, generally fit, just cycling 5 - 10 miles to get to work and back or similar then you will not gain much by spending £700 on a sub 13kg bike and you'll manage with a 20kg bike

Yes the sub £100 always gets slaughtered on here by the pro cyclist brigade but if these sub £100 were not selling why would the big suppliers keep replacing stock? Not everyone buys a cycle to dress up in tight lycra (suppose it's just like women wearing makeup) to cycle daily as a hobby - most cyclist are summer days out riders the rest of the time it's stored in the shed
banned#10
20kg isn't too heavy unless you're intending to break speed records, are seriously unfit, or intend to bike 100+ miles. My mtb is just under 10kg, but it cost me £1,600 and is a hardtail.

One thing I would say, is that if it is really one of those sub £100 bikes then you will really need to be 13 stone or less else the wheels will get buggered in no time.

Secondly, if you're just doing flat roads and a bit of uphill then a full mtb isn't efficient. I understand people love mtbs (I love mtbs, it's all I use regardless of where I'm going) but you should look at a hardtail for what you're describing, if a hybrid or road bike isn't your thing.
#11
philphil61
Sadly the pro cycle brigade have commented and expect every cyclist to spend £700 before it's called a bike and anything less than £100 is a BSO (bike shaped object)

The OP hasn't included in his question

How far he will travel?
Is it road or track surface?
How often he will cycle?
How old and how fit he is?
etc etc

Is a 20kg bike to heavy for flats and a bit uphill? for the pro cyclist brigade, dressed in their club coloured lycra on their also club coloured part carbon part kissed part licked male member extension then of course it's going to be too heavy

If you a man, generally fit, just cycling 5 - 10 miles to get to work and back or similar then you will not gain much by spending £700 on a sub 13kg bike and you'll manage with a 20kg bike

Yes the sub £100 always gets slaughtered on here by the pro cyclist brigade but if these sub £100 were not selling why would the big suppliers keep replacing stock? Not everyone buys a cycle to dress up in tight lycra (suppose it's just like women wearing makeup) to cycle daily as a hobby - most cyclist are summer days out riders the rest of the time it's stored in the shed

""pro cycle brigade"" who's that, are you a pro ?
#12
winter_zombie
philphil61
Sadly the pro cycle brigade have commented and expect every cyclist to spend £700 before it's called a bike and anything less than £100 is a BSO (bike shaped object)

The OP hasn't included in his question

How far he will travel?
Is it road or track surface?
How often he will cycle?
How old and how fit he is?
etc etc

Is a 20kg bike to heavy for flats and a bit uphill? for the pro cyclist brigade, dressed in their club coloured lycra on their also club coloured part carbon part kissed part licked male member extension then of course it's going to be too heavy

If you a man, generally fit, just cycling 5 - 10 miles to get to work and back or similar then you will not gain much by spending £700 on a sub 13kg bike and you'll manage with a 20kg bike

Yes the sub £100 always gets slaughtered on here by the pro cyclist brigade but if these sub £100 were not selling why would the big suppliers keep replacing stock? Not everyone buys a cycle to dress up in tight lycra (suppose it's just like women wearing makeup) to cycle daily as a hobby - most cyclist are summer days out riders the rest of the time it's stored in the shed

""pro cycle brigade"" who's that, are you a pro ?

No a former keen cyclist who knows you don't need to spend £100's

It all depends on what the ultimate goal is -
If you are going to take cycling up as a hobby, riding in a club etc then you need the "right bike" part carbon or light weight etc
If you are "the average Joe" and you need a bike for the occasional day out, or for riding to work (approx 10 - 15 miles max round trip) then you can pick up and use one of the sub £250 bikes (without suspension)

I do not recommend the £100 ASDA/Tesco type bikes as for a few quid more you can buy the Rockrider 300 or a decent secondhand better quality bike - unfortunately not everyone still has a good living wage to layout £300+ on something that will spend most of it's life stored in the shed!
#13
Massively heavy.

My downhill dual suspension bike was 16kg and My Dad's electric bike is 20kg for a little perspective, and I would not like to take my Dad's bike un-assisted up any "slight hill"

I'd expect a standard mtb to be no more than 12-15kg.

The dual suspension was £50 off eBay and was used as a "road bike" , in retrospect I should have just bought a 2nd standard mtb to get into cycling.


Edited By: Gynx on Jul 26, 2014 15:17: mobile edits
#14
philphil61
winter_zombie
philphil61
Sadly the pro cycle brigade have commented and expect every cyclist to spend £700 before it's called a bike and anything less than £100 is a BSO (bike shaped object)

The OP hasn't included in his question

How far he will travel?
Is it road or track surface?
How often he will cycle?
How old and how fit he is?
etc etc

Is a 20kg bike to heavy for flats and a bit uphill? for the pro cyclist brigade, dressed in their club coloured lycra on their also club coloured part carbon part kissed part licked male member extension then of course it's going to be too heavy

If you a man, generally fit, just cycling 5 - 10 miles to get to work and back or similar then you will not gain much by spending £700 on a sub 13kg bike and you'll manage with a 20kg bike

Yes the sub £100 always gets slaughtered on here by the pro cyclist brigade but if these sub £100 were not selling why would the big suppliers keep replacing stock? Not everyone buys a cycle to dress up in tight lycra (suppose it's just like women wearing makeup) to cycle daily as a hobby - most cyclist are summer days out riders the rest of the time it's stored in the shed

""pro cycle brigade"" who's that, are you a pro ?

No a former keen cyclist who knows you don't need to spend £100's

It all depends on what the ultimate goal is -
If you are going to take cycling up as a hobby, riding in a club etc then you need the "right bike" part carbon or light weight etc
If you are "the average Joe" and you need a bike for the occasional day out, or for riding to work (approx 10 - 15 miles max round trip) then you can pick up and use one of the sub £250 bikes (without suspension)

I do not recommend the £100 ASDA/Tesco type bikes as for a few quid more you can buy the Rockrider 300 or a decent secondhand better quality bike - unfortunately not everyone still has a good living wage to layout £300+ on something that will spend most of it's life stored in the shed!

well said, the rockrider is a decent bike for the money or look for something second hand. just avoid the nasty ASDA/TESCO/SPORTS DIRECT Cheap tat. if he told us his budget and needs it would help us all.
banned#15
Gynx
Massively heavy.

My downhill dual suspension bike was 16kg and My Dad's electric bike is 20kg for a little perspective, and I would not like to take my Dad's bike up-assisted up any "slight hill"

I'd expect a standard mtb to be no more than 12-15kg.

The dual suspension was £50 off eBay and was used as a "road bike" , in retrospect I should have just bought a 2nd standard mtb to get into cycling.


without knowing the price/spec of each bike saying your dads electric weighs 20kg offers no perspective at all

so you can pedal a 16kg bike up any hill but feel it would challenge you to ride a 20kg one up a slight hill :|
#16
Gynx
Massively heavy.

My downhill dual suspension bike was 16kg and My Dad's electric bike is 20kg for a little perspective, and I would not like to take my Dad's bike up-assisted up any "slight hill"

I'd expect a standard mtb to be no more than 12-15kg.

The dual suspension was £50 off eBay and was used as a "road bike" , in retrospect I should have just bought a 2nd standard mtb to get into cycling.

Massively heavy lolol

An average male weighs 83.6kgs and you think an extra 4kgs will make that much difference for the average male

Either you have girls legs or you are a pro bike fanatic oh wait...that's wrong you ride a "dual suspension mtb" no real mtb rider would ever consider even a single suspension mtb lol

and an electric bike that weighs 20kgs? is probably just a standard cycle with power assistance generated from a battery weighing approx 4kgs so you still need to pedal to have the "assistance" from the power

I'm an old dog and I know how to suck eggs :p
#17
philphil61
Gynx
Massively heavy.

My downhill dual suspension bike was 16kg and My Dad's electric bike is 20kg for a little perspective, and I would not like to take my Dad's bike up-assisted up any "slight hill"

I'd expect a standard mtb to be no more than 12-15kg.

The dual suspension was £50 off eBay and was used as a "road bike" , in retrospect I should have just bought a 2nd standard mtb to get into cycling.

Massively heavy lolol

An average male weighs 83.6kgs and you think an extra 4kgs will make that much difference for the average male

Either you have girls legs or you are a pro bike fanatic oh wait...that's wrong you ride a "dual suspension mtb" no real mtb rider would ever consider even a single suspension mtb lol

and an electric bike that weighs 20kgs? is probably just a standard cycle with power assistance generated from a battery weighing approx 4kgs so you still need to pedal to have the "assistance" from the power

I'm an old dog and I know how to suck eggs :p

for-old-farts-who-can't-read


was used as a "road bike" , in retrospect should have just bought a 2nd hand straight mtb

Aww, had too much heat?

As said, but with clarification dual suspension bike was used as a road bike for doing 40 miles and then some, on girls legs. Keep up Granddad.



Edited By: Gynx on Jul 26, 2014 15:16
#19
Gynx
philphil61
Gynx
Massively heavy.

My downhill dual suspension bike was 16kg and My Dad's electric bike is 20kg for a little perspective, and I would not like to take my Dad's bike up-assisted up any "slight hill"

I'd expect a standard mtb to be no more than 12-15kg.

The dual suspension was £50 off eBay and was used as a "road bike" , in retrospect I should have just bought a 2nd standard mtb to get into cycling.

Massively heavy lolol

An average male weighs 83.6kgs and you think an extra 4kgs will make that much difference for the average male

Either you have girls legs or you are a pro bike fanatic oh wait...that's wrong you ride a "dual suspension mtb" no real mtb rider would ever consider even a single suspension mtb lol

and an electric bike that weighs 20kgs? is probably just a standard cycle with power assistance generated from a battery weighing approx 4kgs so you still need to pedal to have the "assistance" from the power

I'm an old dog and I know how to suck eggs :p

for-old-farts-who-can't-read


was used as a "road bike" , in retrospect should have just bought a 2nd hand straight mtb

Aww, had too much heat?

As said, but with clarification dual suspension bike was used as a road bike for doing 40 miles and then some, on girls legs. Keep up Granddad.

Not a grandad yet another 12+ years before any chance of that
Happy that you admit to having girls legs - thanks for clarifying - probably is the reason you can't handle a 20kg bike
Yes agreed it seems you needed some education/knowledge to realise it was wrong to buy a full suspension mtb - shows your inexperience/lack of knowledge and possible immaturity it'll come with age
#20

yes it's a good bike (you missed out on the 10% discount) but ignore the original RRP (the actual price now is about how much it's worth) but add in the cost of extra security and insurance as these are often stolen whereas the Rockrider is not so "branded" and less appealing

ps check HUKD's for a code to see if that still works

Edited By: philphil61 on Jul 26, 2014 15:35
#21
philphil61

yes it's a good bike (you missed out on the 10% discount) but ignore the original RRP (the actual price now is about how much it's worth) but add in the cost of extra security and insurance as these are often stolen whereas the Rockrider is not so "branded" and less appealing

ps check HUKD's for a code to see if that still works
I also want the suspension for the smooth ride, will this give me a smooth ride anyway?
#22
You don't need suspension - suspension on bikes is a fairly new gimmick

Even if you wanted to go full mtb riding I'd still not recommend any suspension

Yes you will feel less bumps and a smoother ride but it's your bottom that feels more pain than your hands (they can cope and feel the rough terrain) but using suspension just means harder work on the legs.

IMHO a light hybrid with suspension will just need as much "leg work" as a heavy hybrid without suspension

Your original question was
going mainly on flat road and a little bit of uphill


Edited By: philphil61 on Jul 26, 2014 16:03
#23
philphil61
You don't need suspension - suspension on bikes is a fairly new gimmick

Even if you wanted to go full mtb riding I'd still not recommend any suspension

Yes you will feel less bumps and a smoother ride but it's your bottom that feels more pain than your hands (they can cope and feel the rough terrain) but using suspension just means harder work on the legs.

IMHO a light hybrid with suspension will just need as much "leg work" as a heavy hybrid without suspension
I'm about 14 stones, will this bike be ok and support that weight?
#24
thegamingkinginfo
philphil61
You don't need suspension - suspension on bikes is a fairly new gimmick

Even if you wanted to go full mtb riding I'd still not recommend any suspension

Yes you will feel less bumps and a smoother ride but it's your bottom that feels more pain than your hands (they can cope and feel the rough terrain) but using suspension just means harder work on the legs.

IMHO a light hybrid with suspension will just need as much "leg work" as a heavy hybrid without suspension
I'm about 14 stones, will this bike be ok and support that weight?

14stone is a bit heavy (but not much more than me ;) ) can I suggest you go to Halfords and test ride the Carrera but don't ask advice (unless you know the difference between a seller selling anything and someone who knows what they are talking about). For more direct info try Decathalon and test ride the Rockrider 300 - yes it's slightly heavier than the Carrera but you'd hardly notice the difference and it's cheaper, put together by trained "mechanics", free service with 6mnths (I think), lifetime guarantees on frame etc

I'm not knocking the Carrera - it's a good lighter bike but why I'm against it is the RRP is fake, Halfords have a poor reputation etc

Edited By: philphil61 on Jul 26, 2014 16:12
#25
philphil61
thegamingkinginfo
philphil61
You don't need suspension - suspension on bikes is a fairly new gimmick

Even if you wanted to go full mtb riding I'd still not recommend any suspension

Yes you will feel less bumps and a smoother ride but it's your bottom that feels more pain than your hands (they can cope and feel the rough terrain) but using suspension just means harder work on the legs.

IMHO a light hybrid with suspension will just need as much "leg work" as a heavy hybrid without suspension
I'm about 14 stones, will this bike be ok and support that weight?

14stone is a bit heavy (but not much more than me ;) ) can I suggest you go to Halfords and test ride the Carrera but don't ask advice (unless you know the difference between a seller selling anything and someone who knows what they are talking about). For more direct info try Decathalon and test ride the Rockrider 300 - yes it's slightly heavier than the Carrera but you'd hardly notice the difference and it's cheaper, put together by trained "mechanics", free service with 6mnths (I think), lifetime guarantees on frame etc
The nearest Halfords is a bit too far for me so I guess I'm going to have to go with what I think, hopefully this bike will hold me though as I also think of riding to lose some weight :P
banned#26
philphil61
You don't need suspension - suspension on bikes is a fairly new gimmick

Even if you wanted to go full mtb riding I'd still not recommend any suspension

Yes you will feel less bumps and a smoother ride but it's your bottom that feels more pain than your hands (they can cope and feel the rough terrain) but using suspension just means harder work on the legs.

IMHO a light hybrid with suspension will just need as much "leg work" as a heavy hybrid without suspension

Your original question was
going mainly on flat road and a little bit of uphill

full suspension has been around for about 20 years so its a fairly old gimmick not new

plus for me full suspension means I can burn more calories doing less miles than on a road bike and in more comfort so its win win for the mountain bike
#27
I would say too heavy. It's heavier than my tandem, and that's made to be extra sturdy.
Going up hills could be struggle. It's hard enough with two people peddling (unless she has her feet up again!)
banned#28
Pandamansays
I would say too heavy. It's heavier than my tandem, and that's made to be extra sturdy.
Going up hills could be struggle. It's hard enough with two people peddling (unless she has her feet up again!)

how heavy is your tandem with 2 people on, you then have to allow for the fitter person applying more energy to make up for the lesser input of the other person, so its no wonder you struggle going up hills where someone riding a 20kg bike wouldn't
#29
I recently got a diamondback contra flow which isn't exactly in the cheap and nasty price bracket but noticed that it is 20kg.I gotta say it's the worst bike I've ever ridden. Front wheel had slight buckle in it, disc brakes are dreadful, pedals creak like they're going to break oh and pedalling is a nightmare. Supposed to be aluminium frame - more like cast iron and it takes huge effort to get decent speed out of it. Would I still be able to sell it for £200 and any suggestions on a suitable replacement - obviously £200. My previous bike was a giant sedona and it was awesome with slicks on it. Would it make my life easier just sticking slicks on my db contra flow? I really am gutted as it looks a very nice bike - just not enjoying cycling on it.
#30
RadioActiveChicken
I recently got a diamondback contra flow which isn't exactly in the cheap and nasty price bracket but noticed that it is 20kg.I gotta say it's the worst bike I've ever ridden. Front wheel had slight buckle in it, disc brakes are dreadful, pedals creak like they're going to break oh and pedalling is a nightmare. Supposed to be aluminium frame - more like cast iron and it takes huge effort to get decent speed out of it. Would I still be able to sell it for £200 and any suggestions on a suitable replacement - obviously £200. My previous bike was a giant sedona and it was awesome with slicks on it. Would it make my life easier just sticking slicks on my db contra flow? I really am gutted as it looks a very nice bike - just not enjoying cycling on it.
I got a new bike now called Diamondback Ascent 2014 edition.. Really good!
#31
Im not the best rider, but if you are looking for a bike for use on road and trail get the apollo mentor. It is 13 kgs and only cost £150

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