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a few questions about electric cars

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I have seen a lot of people comment on ev when someone puts a deal or question on it 1 have a few of questions 1. as there are more houses in the UK without private parking than with why haven't t… Read More
MynameisM Avatar
4m, 1w agoPosted 4 months, 1 week ago
I have seen a lot of people comment on ev when someone puts a deal or question on it 1 have a few of questions 1. as there are more houses in the UK without private parking than with why haven't they made the battery be a removable which would let more people into the market of getting one or is this already there but no mention of it.

2. What happens if u run out of charge in the middle of the road are there any spare battery packs u can use to get a piggyback to a place to charge them or not.

3 what are real life figures for them looking into the leafs official figures from online suggest to me that they aren't as efficient as they are made out to be e.g. "Agency (EPA) official range for the 2016 model year Leaf with the 30 kWh battery is 172 km (107 miles) on a full battery charge, while the trim with the smaller 24 kWh battery is 135 km (84 miles), the same as the 2014/15 model year " in the winter I have read they can he upto 5 5 percent less efficient so these figures will be lower in winter.

4 after 5 or 6 years of owning one how much difference has a Nolton who has one noticed in the drop in mileage compared to when new or when they bought it. thanks for your input.
MynameisM Avatar
4m, 1w agoPosted 4 months, 1 week ago
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#1
The batteries are a bit big and heavy to carry around. There was talk of swappable batteries in the renault fluence but its a non-starter really.

If you run out of charge then call your recovery service. Nissan offer recovery as long as you get it serviced at their dealer. If you make a habit of it expect them to tell you to get on your bike.
Different areas of the uk have very different levels of coverage for chargers.

Id say that they are only suitable if you have home or work charging (certainly where we are - very few public chargepoints).
If you can run to the new 200mile range zoe or a tesla then things may be differnt.

Ours is a 63 plate and I'd say the 85 miles is probably about right. It is very dependent on driving style and weather conditions though.
#2
mas99
The batteries are a bit big and heavy to carry around. There was talk of swappable batteries in the renault fluence but its a non-starter really.

If you run out of charge then call your recovery service. Nissan offer recovery as long as you get it serviced at their dealer. If you make a habit of it expect them to tell you to get on your bike.
Different areas of the uk have very different levels of coverage for chargers.

Id say that they are only suitable if you have home or work charging (certainly where we are - very few public chargepoints).
If you can run to the new 200mile range zoe or a tesla then things may be differnt.

Ours is a 63 plate and I'd say the 85 miles is probably about right. It is very dependent on driving style and weather conditions though.


how has the 85 mile range been in the past few weeks when temperature drop below zero
#3
I was thinking the removable battery be like a a built in suitcase with trolley wheels so even it weight upto 50/60 kgs then u could just drag it home abd charge it and maybe in 2 or even 3 parts maybe u should design one for them.
#4
muddassarsardar
I was thinking the removable battery be like a a built in suitcase with trolley wheels so even it weight upto 50/60 kgs then u could just drag it home abd charge it and maybe in 2 or even 3 parts maybe u should design one for them.

Add a nought to that weight. Battery packs for cars weigh in the hundreds of kilograms rather than the dozens.

Spritmonitor is a german site that accepts user submission of car efficiency, they have quite a lot of submission for electric cars if you want some idea of real world efficiency. e.g. the Leaf averages 16.6kWh per 100km (62 miles):
http://www.spritmonitor.de/en/overview/33-Nissan/1296-Leaf.html

So with the 27.5kWh usable capacity on the '30kWh' leaf that's a range of 103 miles. That spare capacity is partly there to accommodate reductions in total capacity over time.

Ignore the UK government range/efficiency figures, the test is even more broken for electric cars than it is for internal combustion ones.
#5
muddassarsardar
mas99
The batteries are a bit big and heavy to carry around. There was talk of swappable batteries in the renault fluence but its a non-starter really.
If you run out of charge then call your recovery service. Nissan offer recovery as long as you get it serviced at their dealer. If you make a habit of it expect them to tell you to get on your bike.
Different areas of the uk have very different levels of coverage for chargers.
Id say that they are only suitable if you have home or work charging (certainly where we are - very few public chargepoints).
If you can run to the new 200mile range zoe or a tesla then things may be differnt.
Ours is a 63 plate and I'd say the 85 miles is probably about right. It is very dependent on driving style and weather conditions though.
how has the 85 mile range been in the past few weeks when temperature drop below zero

Its been down a bit, but tbh our usage doesn't depend on the full range so I've not paid much attention to it - we typically do no more than 50 miles a day and charge overnight.
My wife did do a 60 mile journey and it was showing 15mile range when she got in on the coldest day last week. That was mainly on A roads in the dales with 2 stops and a chunk of town stop start.

I find there is a hit first thing as the car and battery gets up to operating temperature maybe 5-10 miles lost but after that the temp is a bit irrelevant (we have the heat exchanger for cabin heating which is much better than the older heater) what matters more is speed (wind resistance has a big impact at motorway speeds) and weather - driving in the wet makes a surprising amount of difference.

Range falls off most at motorway speeds in my experience. The energy needed to overcome air resistance is significant at high speeds.
#6
A Tesla model S battery pack weighs in at c544 KG which Answers 1&2. As listed above, big heavy battery packs. Don't ignore the range warning, same result if you are in any car that runs out if resources!

Petrol and Diesel mpgs are often only 75% of the optimistic mpgs stated. Whilst I have no experience with the particular
EV the leaf, look on the pessimistic side.
#7
A Tesla model S battery pack weighs in at c544 KG which Answers 1&2. As listed above, big heavy battery packs. Don't ignore the range warning, same result if you are in any car that runs out if resources!

Petrol and Diesel mpgs are often only 75% of the optimistic mpgs stated. Whilst I have no experience with the particular
EV the leaf, look on the pessimistic side.
#8
dothedealnow
A Tesla model S battery pack weighs in at c544 KG which Answers 1&2. As listed above, big heavy battery packs. Don't ignore the range warning, same result if you are in any car that runs out if resources!
Petrol and Diesel mpgs are often only 75% of the optimistic mpgs stated. Whilst I have no experience with the particular
EV the leaf, look on the pessimistic side.
I struggle to understand people's issues with the range on a vehicle. All vehicles have a finite range and an element of common sense is required.
#9
ipswich78
dothedealnow
A Tesla model S battery pack weighs in at c544 KG which Answers 1&2. As listed above, big heavy battery packs. Don't ignore the range warning, same result if you are in any car that runs out if resources!
Petrol and Diesel mpgs are often only 75% of the optimistic mpgs stated. Whilst I have no experience with the particular
EV the leaf, look on the pessimistic side.
I struggle to understand people's issues with the range on a vehicle. All vehicles have a finite range and an element of common sense is required.


Indeed that's true, however EVs and EV charging places are not too common. The main issue is that the time it takes to charge the batteries. Way more planning and time is needed for say a 100 mile EV journey in say a Leaf than in s car powered by fossil fuels. You could argue that if you owned say a Leaf and wanted to do a long journey then you should use another mode of transport or a petrol/diesel car?

I think, unless you have a very limited daily range requirement, then EVs and associated infrastructure are not currently that useful?

I spend my time in c23% of the UK housing stock. a terrace house with on street parking. So an EV is not ideal for me and many of the population until some innovative charging ideas can be implemented.
#10
I always wanted to know how many tons of coal or units of gas it takes to charge a car? Would that be less co2 than petrol?
#11
wayners
I always wanted to know how many tons of coal or units of gas it takes to charge a car? Would that be less co2 than petrol?


Me too. Plus how much the production and running of an EV compares to fossil fueled cars in terms of CO2 and other pollutants
#12
What will they do with the old depleted batteries?.

What they should have is a removable tray of batteries that they can exchange at garages for a fee, That would free the range up and make them more useful. Obviously the tray of batteries would have to be of a universal design, They could no doubt create a machine that could remove them easily enough.

The government and oil companies really do hold innovation back, Hence why we're not taking advantage of renewable energy, We're a relatively small Island surrounded by water, I'm sure we could harness the power of the sea, Combine that with solar panels and wind and they could power us for virtually free baring maintenance and running costs etc..

Oil££££££

Edited By: shauneco on Jan 15, 2017 20:22
#13
shauneco
What will they do with the old depleted batteries?.
What they should have is a removable tray of batteries that they can exchange at garages for a fee, That would free the range up and make them more useful. Obviously the tray of batteries would have to be of a universal design, They could no doubt create a machine that could remove them easily enough.
The government and oil companies really do hold innovation back, Hence why we're not taking advantage of renewable energy, We're a relatively small Island surrounded by water, I'm sure we could harness the power of the sea, Combine that with solar panels and wind and they could power us for virtually free baring maintenance and running costs etc..
Oil££££££

Tesla are already working on that idea actually, (the swappable battery pick up point) they were going to trial one near London in a year or so according to my convo with their uk site manager. As for your other points, the key thing to consider is that renewables are great but intermittent, so to make them useful you need storage tech. And the tech just isn't there at an affordable scale. Batteries whilst better and less prone to fires are only good for a few thousand cycles and the sub second frequency response ones I ve seen go in can only output peak power for thirty minutes max. Just enough to cover frequency fluctuations for national grid and little els, also they are only rated for a few thousand homes so may be good for a village supply at most. I think with a little money and some cutbacks you could very well go completely off grid for a single property but it just doesn't scale very well to a national solution or even inner cities where space is at a premium. As for tidal energy another good idea but again using tidal lagoons only work for fourteenish hours whilst the tide is actually going in/ out. So what about the other ten, mandatory sleep time for the population (tongue in cheek)
#14
the tesla is a expensive one but it seems for the Nissan leaf it could be doable say 4 battery packs weighing 75kgs on a wheels like a shopping travel trolley thig u unplug and take in with u when u go home u could do 1 at a time If u didn't travel far
#15
wayners
I always wanted to know how many tons of coal or units of gas it takes to charge a car? Would that be less co2 than petrol?

It depends on where you are of course. I know the german motorists association ADAC do comparisons between real world pollution of different cars but obviously germany has a different electricity generation mix to us and I'm not aware of a comparable UK effort:
https://www.adac.de/ecotest/

shauneco
What they should have is a removable tray of batteries that they can exchange at garages for a fee, That would free the range up and make them more useful. Obviously the tray of batteries would have to be of a universal design, They could no doubt create a machine that could remove them easily enough.

Bin dun:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Better_Place

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