If a single letter arrives at our address for someone who no longer lives here what do I do? - HotUKDeals
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If a single letter arrives at our address for someone who no longer lives here what do I do?

TiscaliSurvivor Avatar
1y, 3m agoPosted 1 year, 3 months ago
I popped in to the post office and being a good citizen said a letter had arrived to us addressed to a previous owner from 23 years ago. They said I could pay for a stamp because the postage has been used up... I said "didn't the inland letter post scheme allow this simple redirection?" (My mum said 24 hours to put it back in the system and whoosh)? "No" said mohammed (the clerk not the prophet) because we are a business gleefully and if they let a caring citizen like you do it then everyone would do it... So I asked "what happens I drop it in the post with the new address" then "then the recipient pays for the stamp PLUS £1 administration fee". Kerching!... Postman Pat should be ashamed... And the Royal Mail wants to be protected from competition, bring it on...
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TiscaliSurvivor Avatar
1y, 3m agoPosted 1 year, 3 months ago
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Best Answer
I just forward all my unwanted mail now to someone I don't like.

All Responses

(21) Jump to unreadPost an answer
Responses/page:
#1
Thinking about, should I ever feel very bored or angry, I will consider getting my junk mail and cut out any addresses. Then I will write "Private and Confidential" and forward it to

"Mark Waples
1st Floor
Royal Mail Letters Centre
35-50 Rathbone Place
LONDON
W1T 1HQ"

He was the chappy that killed the inland letter scheme.
.
He could then enjoy "business" nature of this change first hand...

Of course I am never that bored...
#2
The nice helpful way = Big bold letters - Not at this address, return to sender, post in a letter box and forget about it.

At least the sender will then update their records (after paying the postage)
banned#3
Mohammed was pulling your leg.
#4
Don't you just write return to sender on it?
#5
sunsip
Mohammed was pulling your leg.

No he was not - I rang 0345 777 7888 to complain and the Brenda confirmed it... May be she's dating Mohammed!
#6
XOXJADEXOX
Don't you just write return to sender on it?

Only normal people would do that ;)
#7
My mum posted a letter to her aunty once and the stamp fell off and the post man knocked and said she had to pay for the stamp cost and that was it
#8
great stuff this is what ask was made for
Personally I would open it to see if it contained
money
juicy gossip
material to bribe someone with
how others live
(only kidding - or am I?)
#9
Bin it. If they haven't been there for 23 years then its obviously not important.

And the Post Office and Royal Mail are 2 separate companies so RM have nothing to be ashamed of.


Edited By: stuarthanley on Aug 14, 2015 17:31: .
#10
I got this often for a few years... still do on the rare occasion. I simply cross the (my) address out, and in pencil or other on the letter "Return to sender - Addressee unknown" .. seems to have helped cut things down, and I'd hope the companies would get in contact with them to find new address.
People should to this in general ... it wasn't after 2 yrs before my boss realised they were sending my pay increase letters to an address I'd not been living at for a while. My mistake there partly, but as I'd got them via email, I never thought about it in general. Formality required it gets posted.
#11
sowotsdis
great stuff this is what ask was made for
Personally I would open it to see if it contained
money
juicy gossip
material to bribe someone with
how others live
(only kidding - or am I?)


Tbh I but the peoples who use to live in our houses in the bin. I did open their tesco clubcard vouchers to see what they were getting lol I still receive them I just put them in the bin now
#12
It is best to just put some bold lines through the wrong address on the envelope n put NOT KNOWN AT THIS ADDRESS next to it n put it back in the postbox, we have done this many times and had no repercussions.
I have always been under the impression that it is actually illegal to open someone else's mail or to discard it in the bin, I realise that if the intended recipient is not getting their mail they probably would never know anyway but not sure I'd want to take the risk just for the sake of putting it back in the postbox(_;)
#13
stuarthanley
Bin it. If they haven't been there for 23 years then its obviously not important.
And the Post Office and Royal Mail are 2 separate companies so RM have nothing to be ashamed of.
Could have been from a long lost relative who had died and left millions to them. Or a final demand for a library book from 1992.
#14
cornishscouse
stuarthanley
Bin it. If they haven't been there for 23 years then its obviously not important.
And the Post Office and Royal Mail are 2 separate companies so RM have nothing to be ashamed of.
Could have been from a long lost relative who had died and left millions to them. Or a final demand for a library book from 1992.
Possibly. Not too sure what the OP expects though. The postage has been paid to deliver the mail from A to B. It doesn't then cover the cost of delivering from B to C.
Not sure what people want for 63p oO
#15
Open it and keep your fingers crossed there's money in it
#16
I've been redirecting mail to my flatmate who is working away just now and he hasn't mentioned that he is getting charged for the redirection oO I'll have to ask him when I talk to him next.
#17
MichyM
The nice helpful way = Big bold letters - Not at this address, return to sender, post in a letter box and forget about it.
At least the sender will then update their records (after paying the postage)

I work in an industry where we get mail returned from people quite often.

It's quite often that we have to get in touch with people to say "Are you still alive?" or words to that effect.

If you've received some post when you've moved in somewhere, and it's addressed to someone who might be a pensioner, could you at least forward it to the letting agent or solicitor?

I deal with many cases where someone has had to be moved into a care home, and because we haven't been notified of a change of address, we have to stop their pension to mitigate fraud prevention.

Before just binning - or returning - letters please at least consider if there is a likely point of contact.

People trying to contact pensioners aren't all fraudsters.




Edited By: weekender on Aug 14, 2015 18:53
#18
sowotsdis
great stuff this is what ask was made for
Personally I would open it to see if it contained
money
juicy gossip
material to bribe someone with
how others live
(only kidding - or am I?)


Hahaha...I would do the same ;-)
#19
Our postman told us to cross out the address, put 'RTS' (Return To Sender) on front and back, and put it in a post box. The Sender is then likely to update their records. Obviously only works if there is a return address...
#20
I just forward all my unwanted mail now to someone I don't like.
#21
weekender
It's quite often that we have to get in touch with people to say "Are you still alive?" or words to that effect.

How is that done? Gather the team around the meeting desk and hold a seance? Hire Derek Acorah? :D

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