If a zero-hour contract job pays £32,000 a year pro rata part time, how much will one earn per hour? - HotUKDeals
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If a zero-hour contract job pays £32,000 a year pro rata part time, how much will one earn per hour?

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Hey all :) Just had a random question regarding a position I'm interested in. There's a job that pays £32,000 a year PRO RATA PART TIME on a zero hour contract. I understand hours can average be… Read More
WaxMechaniK Avatar
5m, 2w agoPosted 5 months, 2 weeks ago
Hey all :)

Just had a random question regarding a position I'm interested in.

There's a job that pays £32,000 a year PRO RATA PART TIME on a zero hour contract. I understand hours can average between 5 to 20 or more per week, depending on availability.

So can anyone confirm how much I would earn per hour please?
WaxMechaniK Avatar
5m, 2w agoPosted 5 months, 2 weeks ago
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(32) Jump to unreadPost an answer
Responses/page:
#1
Impossible to tell given your figures
#2
No - think it is illegal to offer a fixed salary for a zero hours contract?
#3
Zero. If you get no hours the hourly rate does not matter.
I'm guessing it's some kind of sales job with an (unrealistic) expected earnings, so you can't work out an hourly rate.
#4
doesn't even make sense that .
zero hours but 32k oO
[mod][Mod Team]#5
Depends on whether it's based on a 35 or 40 hour working week (or another weekly rate).

35 hrs = £17.58ph
40 hrs = £15.38ph
#6
32000/(20x52)= £30.77
lowest
32000/ (52x5) = £123.07
Highest?

Edited By: sowotsdis on Jan 01, 2017 16:09
#7
The maths won't work without a full time hours figure.
But
Assuming 40 hrs/ week = £16 p/h pt-pro rata
https://salarybot.co.uk


Edited By: syne209 on Jan 02, 2017 15:05: Bad maths
#8
BeerDrinker
Depends on whether it's based on a 35 or 40 hour working week (or another weekly rate).

35 hrs = £17.58ph
40 hrs = £15.38ph


Still doesn't get round the dichotomy of Zero hours earning £32k.
#9
BTW who or what will you be waxing?
#10
Thanks all!

It's a mental support role at a university and there are 3 positions available.

It says this on the job page:
Contract type: Casual
This is a zero-hour position.
£32,600 per annum (pro rata if part-time)

And I was told on the phone that the hours can range from 5 to 20 or more if you want.
[mod][Mod Team]#11
mtuk1
BeerDrinker
Depends on whether it's based on a 35 or 40 hour working week (or another weekly rate).
35 hrs = £17.58ph
40 hrs = £15.38ph
Still doesn't get round the dichotomy of Zero hours earning £32k.

The zero hours bit means you aren't guaranteed any set hours in any given week. The salaried figure will be based on a full-time equivalent working week. If we knew the full-time equivalent hours per week, we'd be able to give an hourly rate
#12
That's stupid, they should be advertising as an hourly rate not impossible yearly salary
#13
Well if based around a standard 37.5 hour week it works out at £16.41ph.
#14
Hope you have a supplementary income to get by when you are getting zero hours.
Cheap way for a company to get round paying overtime and additional holiday pay to full time emplohees which will potentially be the only hours you will be picking up.
#15
WaxMechaniK
Thanks all!

It's a mental support role at a university and there are 3 positions available.

It says this on the job page:
Contract type: Casual
This is a zero-hour position.
£32,600 per annum (pro rata if part-time)

And I was told on the phone that the hours can range from 5 to 20 or more if you want.

So it will be university term time only. So on those weeks when closed you will earn nothing. On a 5 hour week you will take home about £80 and about £300 on a 20 hour week.


Edited By: GAVINLEWISHUKD on Jan 01, 2017 16:22
#16
Aha OK, thank you all. Sorry just wanted to clarify it as it seemed confusing.

I already work as and when for another company and choose my shifts, which can be 0 hour to 36 hours or even more. So this would be in addition...
#17
here's an idea. Why don't you just call them and find out?!
#18
peeej1978
here's an idea. Why don't you just call them and find out?!
They're out of office at the moment over the christmas and new year period.
#19
Zero hours should be illegal. When we went to apply for a mortgage, nationwide would not take the 0hour wage into consideration.
#20
splatsplatsplat
Zero hours should be illegal. When we went to apply for a mortgage, nationwide would not take the 0hour wage into consideration.
Oh hmm that's an important point to consider!
#21
splatsplatsplat
Zero hours should be illegal. When we went to apply for a mortgage, nationwide would not take the 0hour wage into consideration.

While I'll agree it can be a PITA I like it. But that's probably because I could probably work 7 days a week if I wanted to but equally I can have as much time off as I like.
It takes a bit of adjusting of life but once you have don't that it's great. Money at first was a worry but once you balance it you will be fine. I no longer worry about money.
#22
splatsplatsplat
Zero hours should be illegal. When we went to apply for a mortgage, nationwide would not take the 0hour wage into consideration.
really? 0 hrours for me is a godsend. I'm studying at the moment and with my uni timetable it is impossible to fit any regular working hours. even better I dont have to come in to work when I have extra stuff to do at uni. so NO zero hours should not be banned.

looking for a mortgage on 0hrs is like skydiving with potentially faulty parachute its just plain dumb.

in regards to the OP question divide the figure by 12 and then by 161.5


Edited By: mattsokolinski on Jan 01, 2017 16:42
#23
WaxMechaniK
peeej1978
here's an idea. Why don't you just call them and find out?!
They're out of office at the moment over the christmas and new year period.


Then you can't pursue the job till they're back. Anything short of speaking to them directly is pure speculation and won't provide anything in the way useful information for you. Only way forward is to speak to them and make an informed decision.
#24
BeerDrinker
mtuk1
BeerDrinker
Depends on whether it's based on a 35 or 40 hour working week (or another weekly rate).
35 hrs = £17.58ph
40 hrs = £15.38ph
Still doesn't get round the dichotomy of Zero hours earning £32k.

The zero hours bit means you aren't guaranteed any set hours in any given week. The salaried figure will be based on a full-time equivalent working week. If we knew the full-time equivalent hours per week, we'd be able to give an hourly rate


You missed the point. oO
#25
It is a contradiction or a con.
[mod][Mod Team]#26
mtuk1
BeerDrinker
mtuk1
BeerDrinker
Depends on whether it's based on a 35 or 40 hour working week (or another weekly rate).
35 hrs = £17.58ph
40 hrs = £15.38ph
Still doesn't get round the dichotomy of Zero hours earning £32k.
The zero hours bit means you aren't guaranteed any set hours in any given week. The salaried figure will be based on a full-time equivalent working week. If we knew the full-time equivalent hours per week, we'd be able to give an hourly rate
You missed the point. oO

Didn't miss the point at all. Can see where you're coming from and I did see it from the start, I just decided not to be pedantic about it as it's easy to surmise what the OP meant.
#27
BeerDrinker
mtuk1
BeerDrinker
mtuk1
BeerDrinker
Depends on whether it's based on a 35 or 40 hour working week (or another weekly rate).
35 hrs = £17.58ph
40 hrs = £15.38ph
Still doesn't get round the dichotomy of Zero hours earning £32k.
The zero hours bit means you aren't guaranteed any set hours in any given week. The salaried figure will be based on a full-time equivalent working week. If we knew the full-time equivalent hours per week, we'd be able to give an hourly rate
You missed the point. oO

Didn't miss the point at all. Can see where you're coming from and I did see it from the start, I just decided not to be pedantic about it as it's easy to surmise what the OP meant.


No it's not. If you have a Zero hours contract, you can't earn a salary of £32 k a year.
#28
peeej1978
WaxMechaniK
peeej1978
here's an idea. Why don't you just call them and find out?!
They're out of office at the moment over the christmas and new year period.
Then you can't pursue the job till they're back. Anything short of speaking to them directly is pure speculation and won't provide anything in the way useful information for you. Only way forward is to speak to them and make an informed decision.
I wanted to have a good idea of the pay before applying as I'd like to sort my application out this weekend. Of course I will get all this clarified but wanted to discuss it on here to get a better idea in advance.
#29
No it's not. If you have a Zero hours contract, you can't earn a salary of £32 k a year.
Pedantry aside, you can, because it's pro rata. Even if you do no hours you'll still be on 32k p/a pro rata with a take home pay of £0.

Either way it works out about £16 ph.
#30
WaxMechaniK
peeej1978
WaxMechaniK
peeej1978
here's an idea. Why don't you just call them and find out?!
They're out of office at the moment over the christmas and new year period.
Then you can't pursue the job till they're back. Anything short of speaking to them directly is pure speculation and won't provide anything in the way useful information for you. Only way forward is to speak to them and make an informed decision.
I wanted to have a good idea of the pay before applying as I'd like to sort my application out this weekend. Of course I will get all this clarified but wanted to discuss it on here to get a better idea in advance.


But you have no better idea because these people simply don't know the ins and outs of the offer. So, you're no closer to knowing what the deal is!
#31
some slightly confusing info itt and it won't get any better with my input :D

there is no recognition in law specifically for 0 hour contracts, they are a fiction and whilst not illegal their lack of recognition means they are not legal either for example.

I am employed on a zero hour contract for 6 months and work an actual 20 hours per week, in law that then becomes the contract and you are entitled to holiday pay based on that amount not the original contract, there is no escaping "statutory" requirements in holiday pay etc.
#32
Take into account any "perks" that you may have also. As an example we have a few workers who work in another full time job during the week and work for us for 6-8 hours during the weekend. As you have a contract with the company they are entitled to the same perks we get. Meaning free private medical insurance (pays dentistry bill and opticians as two big examples), 10% off our stores, 2p off per litre of fuel and ability to buy any goods at our cost price, pay roll giving £1 for £1 matching,Pension £1 for £1 matching (limited though as a percentage of your last years P60). Before zero hours contract they where employed through agency and got none of this


Edited By: cecilmcroberts on Jan 03, 2017 13:15

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