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ADSL Cables - Are the cheap ones any good?

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Or is it worth paying a little bit more for better quality. The reason I ask is that the one that came with my new Sky Q router is a little short due to placement. Just wondered if cheap ones … Read More
TH5 Avatar
4m, 2w agoPosted 4 months, 2 weeks ago
Or is it worth paying a little bit more for better quality.

The reason I ask is that the one that came with my new Sky Q router is a little short due to placement.

Just wondered if cheap ones are ok or where to go for a decent one. Cheers...
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TH5 Avatar
4m, 2w agoPosted 4 months, 2 weeks ago
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#1
length is important (titter), as the signal signal degrades over a distance but I'm guessing the amount between 1m and 3m is probably negligible. Also, the longer the cable, the more interference it will be subject to from any and all other electrical equipment your house.
All that said, you'll get a better signal from higher quality cable but probably not enough to notice
#2
If your talking about the modem cable, so cable from router to telephone socket, the rj11 cable, I would say go for a decent quality one else you will increase noise on the line. But depends on how far you are going with the cable, I extended mine with a 10m one and line actuation increased. So instead left the modem where it was and installed a lan cable to a wireless bridge which meant I also got better wireless through the house.
#3
This question has so many different factors and scenarios the answer is it depends! If you are few hundred yards from the exchange and have the maximum provision on the line then you can probably get away with anything and not see much of a difference. But if you are in the middle of nowhere on a long reach and need every kbit then a decent cable between the dp and router is probably one of the most vital investments. The other thing is the length of the cable,as that cable gets longer signal loss does start to play a role in your final broadband speed. Amazon search of 'high speed adsl cable' shows some cheap cables at not a great cost to see if the replacement would work for your config.
#4
extending a 1 to 10m RJ11 cable will have negligible effects on the signal a very slight increase in line attenuation but not enough to worry about, unless your obsessed with numbers. I would avoid the super cheep ones from some unknown manufacture as the construction quality is potentially a problem. (Poundland will probable have one) don't get ripped off by some expensive BS about special cables oxygen free copper etc, it wont make a bit of differance to this connection.
just avoid running the cable too near to other cables as it will cause interference, add noise and distortion to the signal and lower your bandwidth speed.
#5
The flat cable that comes with free with most setups is useless alot like the adsl filters which should be banned.
Install a vdsl face plate and buy a rj11 to rj45 shielded twisted vdsl cable and you should see quite a difference. Flat cables and filters are rubbish and the 1st thing they swap out when they install higher tier stuff.
Adsl filters are useful for slowing down internet speeds for the masses. Completely useless for the signal to go through a cheap faceplate into a flat cable to a rubbish filter to another flat cable to your modem.
#6
http://www.ispreview.co.uk/index.php/2014/02/importance-connecting-adsl-fttc-broadband-via-twisted-pair-cable.html

In my case I went from 39mbit to 54mbit which isn't a bad step up for a £20 investment.
#7
A cheap one will work but to cover yourself for years down the line when you no longer care, just get a decent one and be done with, the flat ones where you can see the 4wires separated but stuck together are the worst these cheap one CAN sometimes cause intermittent sync or slower sync once in a while. Especially if you're on FTTC/fibre. the ones that come with the router are fine except for some talktalk/plusnet I find them to be the most problem prone.

(its my dayjob)
#8
You can get poor quality control on really cheap cables, but having said that, I have only had one set that didnt work in years of buying them, the ends hadnt been striped properly and the terminations were wrapped around the insulation, rather than the actual copper cable.

As above, unless you are looking at a really long line and/or an area awash with radio frequency noise, any cable will do the job.
#9
Digital signals are far more immune to degradation than analogue...
For one bit of information to be decoded correctly, all that has to be decided is if a voltage level is present or not.
Therefore, the cabling need not be of stupendous quality...also, I believe virtually all digital cable has to meet a certain quality...
For that consideration an HDMI cable from the Poundshop may perform electrically, if not physically as well as a "high end" one costing many, many times as much.
#10
scottswaha
Digital signals are far more immune to degradation than analogue...
For one bit of information to be decoded correctly, all that has to be decided is if a voltage level is present or not.
Therefore, the cabling need not be of stupendous quality...also, I believe virtually all digital cable has to meet a certain quality...
For that consideration an HDMI cable from the Poundshop may perform electrically, if not physically as well as a "high end" one costing many, many times as much.


I'm not the brightest spark but I'm pretty sure it's a modulated analogue signal (QAM) and not a digital signal.
#11
Simplistically: there are two items to consider for cables carrying the signal from master socket to router: signal degradation and physcal strength. Signal degradation will be minimised by using cable of similar conductor characteristics as used by BT Openreach such as solid copper twisted pair (avoid LAN cable such as CAT5 / CAT6) and physical strength can typically be down to the arbitary look of cable and connectors (!). In all cases, it is generally beneficial to minimise the number of connection joints, so if you need an additional 3metre lead to extend a 2metre lead provided with the router, obtain a 5metre cable i.e. do not use an extention cable. Random examples of £3.45 3metre cable and £4.99 5metre modem lead using solid copper twisted pair cable and with some informational text within the listing http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/330950863072 and http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/330949311028
Retain the original modem lead supplied with the router to optionally use instead of the replacement during any subsequent support requirement from your provider (your provider supplied it so the provider should support it).
#12
Thanks for all comments here. So, if I was to go for a new 3m cable, the one, as mentioned above, would be best? The twisted copper? I take it these are better than those supplied by the provider?
#13
TH5
Thanks for all comments here. So, if I was to go for a new 3m cable, the one, as mentioned above, would be best? The twisted copper? I take it these are better than those supplied by the provider?
The difference in electrical & physical quality between the originally-supplied cable and the suggested replacement will be night and day. It is unlikely you could significantly improve on the cost/performance ratio of the suggested replacement items.
#14
AndyRoyd
Simplistically: there are two items to consider for cables carrying the signal from master socket to router: signal degradation and physcal strength. Signal degradation will be minimised by using cable of similar conductor characteristics as used by BT Openreach such as solid copper twisted pair (avoid LAN cable such as CAT5 / CAT6) and physical strength can typically be down to the arbitary look of cable and connectors (!). In all cases, it is generally beneficial to minimise the number of connection joints, so if you need an additional 3metre lead to extend a 2metre lead provided with the router, obtain a 5metre cable i.e. do not use an extention cable. Random examples of £3.45 3metre cable and £4.99 5metre modem lead using solid copper twisted pair cable and with some informational text within the listing http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/330950863072 and http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/330949311028
Retain the original modem lead supplied with the router to optionally use instead of the replacement during any subsequent support requirement from your provider (your provider supplied it so the provider should support it).


This ebay guy is a real half truth kind of guy. Virgin only use their telephone line for telephone and not broadband so they just throw down the standard cable.
The BPO, Telecom, BT cable could of been down there for around 20+ years so probably not the state of the art tech. There's very little emf under the ground until it hits your home. Inside your house it's a different environment so it's better to have more shielding higher twists.
Telecoms don't use cat 5 cable on the wan side because it's a network cable and costs a lot more to produce but if they did you would probably have a better signal further away from the main cabinet.
The guy even compares a modulated signal range to a local network for range ? oO
I agree there's a lot of cca and ccs out there but it's not that cat5 is crap for this purpose just that cca is crap.
#15
kester76
AndyRoyd
Simplistically: there are two items to consider for cables carrying the signal from master socket to router: signal degradation and physcal strength. Signal degradation will be minimised by using cable of similar conductor characteristics as used by BT Openreach such as solid copper twisted pair (avoid LAN cable such as CAT5 / CAT6) and physical strength can typically be down to the arbitary look of cable and connectors (!). In all cases, it is generally beneficial to minimise the number of connection joints, so if you need an additional 3metre lead to extend a 2metre lead provided with the router, obtain a 5metre cable i.e. do not use an extention cable. Random examples of £3.45 3metre cable and £4.99 5metre modem lead using solid copper twisted pair cable and with some informational text within the listing http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/330950863072 and http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/330949311028
Retain the original modem lead supplied with the router to optionally use instead of the replacement during any subsequent support requirement from your provider (your provider supplied it so the provider should support it).
This ebay guy is a real half truth kind of guy. Virgin only use their telephone line for telephone and not broadband so they just throw down the standard cable.
The BPO, Telecom, BT cable could of been down there for around 20+ years so probably not the state of the art tech. There's very little emf under the ground until it hits your home. Inside your house it's a different environment so it's better to have more shielding higher twists.
Telecoms don't use cat 5 cable on the wan side because it's a network cable and costs a lot more to produce but if they did you would probably have a better signal further away from the main cabinet.
The guy even compares a modulated signal range to a local network for range ? oO
I agree there's a lot of cca and ccs out there but it's not that cat5 is crap for this purpose just that cca is crap.
Possibly out of context concerning Virgin cable options as that is not applicable to the OP question nor included in suitability suggestion from ebay merchant that specifically mentions ADSL & Infinity applications in listing title. Also consider that if BTO install an extension socket they will use CW1308 cable (solid copper, twisted pair). CCA avoidance agreed. Regardless of any dreary tech discussion, the OP has a credible solution to provide best option to meet the requirement.
#16
AndyRoyd
kester76
AndyRoyd
Simplistically: there are two items to consider for cables carrying the signal from master socket to router: signal degradation and physcal strength. Signal degradation will be minimised by using cable of similar conductor characteristics as used by BT Openreach such as solid copper twisted pair (avoid LAN cable such as CAT5 / CAT6) and physical strength can typically be down to the arbitary look of cable and connectors (!). In all cases, it is generally beneficial to minimise the number of connection joints, so if you need an additional 3metre lead to extend a 2metre lead provided with the router, obtain a 5metre cable i.e. do not use an extention cable. Random examples of £3.45 3metre cable and £4.99 5metre modem lead using solid copper twisted pair cable and with some informational text within the listing http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/330950863072 and http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/330949311028
Retain the original modem lead supplied with the router to optionally use instead of the replacement during any subsequent support requirement from your provider (your provider supplied it so the provider should support it).
This ebay guy is a real half truth kind of guy. Virgin only use their telephone line for telephone and not broadband so they just throw down the standard cable.
The BPO, Telecom, BT cable could of been down there for around 20+ years so probably not the state of the art tech. There's very little emf under the ground until it hits your home. Inside your house it's a different environment so it's better to have more shielding higher twists.
Telecoms don't use cat 5 cable on the wan side because it's a network cable and costs a lot more to produce but if they did you would probably have a better signal further away from the main cabinet.
The guy even compares a modulated signal range to a local network for range ? oO
I agree there's a lot of cca and ccs out there but it's not that cat5 is crap for this purpose just that cca is crap.
Possibly out of context concerning Virgin cable options as that is not applicable to the OP question nor included in suitability suggestion from ebay merchant that specifically mentions ADSL & Infinity applications in listing title. Also consider that if BTO install an extension socket they will use CW1308 cable (solid copper, twisted pair). CCA avoidance agreed. Regardless of any dreary tech discussion, the OP has a credible solution to provide best option to meet the requirement.
Not advisable to plug the modem into anything but the master box and also better to install a VDSL faceplate makes a huge difference. I have no issue with the cable the guy is selling but he's stretching the truth when he's states cat3 has better signal performance that cat5 :)

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