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advice on damp in house

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Hi. Wanting a bit of advice please. Realised my living room wall where the window is was quite wet this morning. Wiped it clean. But a bit later on was wet again. Don't know what is causing this. Thin… Read More
bingbing1 Avatar
3m, 2w agoPosted 3 months, 2 weeks ago
Hi. Wanting a bit of advice please. Realised my living room wall where the window is was quite wet this morning. Wiped it clean. But a bit later on was wet again. Don't know what is causing this. Think it's damp in the walls. Now what is the best solution for this.? To get rid of it
bingbing1 Avatar
3m, 2w agoPosted 3 months, 2 weeks ago
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Responses/page:
#1
damp wouldn't come on that quickly or severely if you'd never noticed it before. Is it raining where you are? Perhaps there is some damage around the window seal?
#2
No not rained for a week or two. Have checked around window. Seal seems intact. The wall beneath the window is wet. So I assumed it was damp. And kind of a mouldy smell.
#3
Look at the outside - is the gutter OK, are there any plants against the house? Is the ventilation ok? Is the damp proof course intact? look for any damage. Inside look up for a leak and down for rising damp, is it an old house? Have you got washing about - do you have a dehumidifier? At this time of year people think they can have washing on the radiator - where do they think the water is going??? (not aimed at you)
#4
caroline777upnorth
Look at the outside - is the gutter OK, are there any plants against the house? Is the ventilation ok? Is the damp proof course intact? look for any damage. Inside look up for a leak and down for rising damp, is it an old house? Have you got washing about - do you have a dehumidifier? At this time of year people think they can have washing on the radiator - where do they think the water is going??? (not aimed at you)


Thanks will go through the list of things you have pointed out. Have not got a dehumidifier. May need to invest in one. Someone else suggested to get a builder to remove one of the bricks from outside, which will let air inside the house from outside. Which may help. But dont know if that will actually work. Dont want to be paying builders if it doesn't solve my problem!
#5
bingbing1
caroline777upnorth
Look at the outside - is the gutter OK, are there any plants against the house? Is the ventilation ok? Is the damp proof course intact? look for any damage. Inside look up for a leak and down for rising damp, is it an old house? Have you got washing about - do you have a dehumidifier? At this time of year people think they can have washing on the radiator - where do they think the water is going??? (not aimed at you)


Thanks will go through the list of things you have pointed out. Have not got a dehumidifier. May need to invest in one. Someone else suggested to get a builder to remove one of the bricks from outside, which will let air inside the house from outside. Which may help. But dont know if that will actually work. Dont want to be paying builders if it doesn't solve my problem!


they must mean taking a brick out and adding an air brick. it won't let air into your house. only into the cavity. this could stop damp if you have a cavity (really old houses dont) and you don't have air bricks or the air bricks are blocked.
but as said already said, if you wipe it dry then it's wet hours later then it's not damp.

it could be that rain is getting in through cracks in chimney or similar then running down cavity
#6
Bathroom/shower above?
#7
Are the windows closed? 99% of the time its due to poor ventilation.
#8
matt1982villa
Bathroom/shower above?


No. Bedroom above.
#9
thecoolguy
Are the windows closed? 99% of the time its due to poor ventilation.


Yes. Closed majority of the time. Open
Id say a hour or two
#10
Is the wall cold to the touch ?
#11
kester76
Is the wall cold to the touch ?


Yes it is.
#12
bingbing1
kester76
Is the wall cold to the touch ?


Yes it is.


Dont get much sunlight on this side of the house either :(
#13
Dont get much sunlight on this side of the house either :(
#14
Ok I have a few questions. Removing a brick isn't going to solve the problem. There are three things that cause damp. You have a water leak, either hot, cold or radiator pipe. You have water coming in from outside due to poor sealing of the window or there is a lack of air circulation in the room causing condensation. This can also happen in the summer and not just winter. Ok, here are my questions.

1. How old is the house. I am trying to establish if it has a solid wall or the modern method with a cavity.
2. Is the external wall brick, render or other
3. Is the window double glazed or single glazed
4. Is there a radiator below the window and if so where do the pipes go, i.e. in the wall or in the floor
5. In the room above is there a radiator directly above the window.
6. Is the window a flat or bay window. If a bay does it have a canopy above it.
7. Do you know if your cold water main runs under your living room floor. It's normally a straight direct run from wherever your outside meter / stop cock is to your kitchen sink. You could have a leak.
8. Is the wall a plaster wall or plasterboard.
8. Lastly. Has your house had cavity wall insulation installed similar to the schemes the government were offering for free. I refused to have mine done as although my house was built in 1969 and could do with some extra insulation I also saw the reports on watchdog. My house doesn't have any trickle ventilators in the windows and the only rapid ventilation it gets is when I open the front door!! Not a good idea to suddenly increase the thermal value without also making sure it can breathe and after seeing the amount of crap the builders drop (although they shouldn't) between the cavities it's a wonder there isn't more damp issues. New builds are different as they are designed to be thermally efficient and to breathe. They also have the added addition of vapour barriers.

As much as we are all willing to help damp can come from a few sources and more often than not is because of water ingress but if you can take a little time to have a look at my questions it may offer a more direct solution compared with a mere guess.

Edited By: Smartguy1 on Feb 04, 2017 21:16
#15
is the wall papered or painted? Any visible signs of mould? Anyone you know willing to lend a dehumidifier?

Most probable cause if it hasnt rained recently and the wall is cold is condensation. Dry wall with hairdrier, tape a piece of foil to the dry wall making as airtight as possible. Leave overnight. If wet on outside problem is condensation.
#16
Smartguy1
Ok I have a few questions. Removing a brick isn't going to solve the problem. There are three things that cause damp. You have a water leak, either hot, cold or radiator pipe. You have water coming in from outside due to poor sealing of the window or there is a lack of air circulation in the room causing condensation. This can also happen in the summer and not just winter. Ok, here are my questions.

1. How old is the house. I am trying to establish if it has a solid wall or the modern method with a cavity.
2. Is the external wall brick, render or other
3. Is the window double glazed or single glazed
4. Is there a radiator below the window and if so where do the pipes go, i.e. in the wall or in the floor
5. In the room above is there a radiator directly above the window.
6. Is the window a flat or bay window. If a bay does it have a canopy above it.
7. Do you know if your cold water main runs under your living room floor. It's normally a straight direct run from wherever your outside meter / stop cock is to your kitchen sink. You could have a leak.
8. Is the wall a plaster wall or plasterboard.
8. Lastly. Has your house had cavity wall insulation installed similar to the schemes the government were offering for free. I refused to have mine done as although my house was built in 1969 and could do with some extra insulation I also saw the reports on watchdog. My house doesn't have any trickle ventilators in the windows and the only rapid ventilation it gets is when I open the front door!! Not a good idea to suddenly increase the thermal value without also making sure it can breathe and after seeing the amount of crap the builders drop (although they shouldn't) between the cavities it's a wonder there isn't more damp issues. New builds are different as they are designed to be thermally efficient and to breathe. They also have the added addition of vapour barriers.

As much as we are all willing to help damp can come from a few sources and more often than not is because of water ingress but if you can take a little time to have a look at my questions it may offer a more direct solution compared with a mere guess.


External wall is brick. Is double glazing. Got the cavity wall insulation last summer around july 2016. No radiator below window. Just a wall with wallpaper. The room above is same, no radiator. Just a wall with wallpaper. Window is flat. Not a bay window. House is old. Probably built in the 1900's.
#17
buzzard
is the wall papered or painted? Any visible signs of mould? Anyone you know willing to lend a dehumidifier?

Most probable cause if it hasnt rained recently and the wall is cold is condensation. Dry wall with hairdrier, tape a piece of foil to the dry wall making as airtight as possible. Leave overnight. If wet on outside problem is condensation.


Wall paper
#18
Ok, thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. I see that you have checked seals around window and condition of external brickwork. One easy thing to check first.

UPVC windows have some drain holes within the frame. They are in the cill at the bottom. If you open a window you will see some slots. Using a piece of stiff wire make sure that these are clear to the outside. A build up of water can cause rainwater to come inside if these are blocked. I doubt if it is this but is an easy one to check.

I assume this is only a recent event reference the damp and there are no other damp issues elsewhere. If you have no water pipes in the vicinity of the wall and your mains water pipe doesn't run under the living room or in the wall then the only possible answer I can give is the damp is caused by the cavity wall insulation you had done last year and the wall is sweating due to lack of ventilation in the room or there is debris in the cavity so any moisture from the outside is being transferred to the inside. Whoever installed the insulation should have done a survey of the cavities with a camera first.

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