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advice on joining uni please

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Hi guys, I'm sorry if I'm asking this under the wrong section I know Hot uk deals is for deals but sorry don't know who else to ask, So basically I really want to join university this September, but… Read More
badboyg Avatar
3w, 2d agoPosted 3 weeks, 2 days ago
Hi guys,

I'm sorry if I'm asking this under the wrong section I know Hot uk deals is for deals but sorry don't know who else to ask,

So basically I really want to join university this September, but unsure if it worth joining and do not even know what course to do I would need to do a foundation degree as I did not get good grades at school,

I am a 24 year old stay at home mom and I have a 1 year old son but my OH(other half) has agreed to help look after him the days I am at uni,


I qualified as a hairdresser but hated it, then went on to becoming a care assistant and loved my job but i don't want to go back to doing that.

I have always thought university is not for me as I don't have a clue what I want to do I am the type of person who always changes my mind I just think if I go uni then I have a better chance of getting a high paid job I have the intentions of sending my son to a private school for a better education and want to give him the best in life hence why I want a good high paid job,

I am very bubbly very friendly and could possibly do any job out there lol and would want to do a course which would benifit me in different job roles,

Basically I just need advice from you guys weather it is worth it going university and getting a degree does it really help you get a good high paid job, I know some people might say it's not just about the degree you need to work hard to and I am very hardworking when I am given a task or job to do I do it with 110% effort,

I have asked everyone around me and I have even been to see a careers advisor but that wasn't very helpful,

I have no idea what I want to do but I do know I want to better myself and get a degree and a good job

I know if I start uni I will separate my home life to my uni life have time to do my coursework and revise and so I'm not worried it would interfere with me being a mom to a toddler,

Any advice would be great

Thankyou xx
badboyg Avatar
3w, 2d agoPosted 3 weeks, 2 days ago
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(1)
There are lots of free short courses to try on the Open University - start there and good luck.
http://www.open.edu/openlearn/free-courses/full-catalogue

Edited By: caroline777upnorth on Jun 02, 2017 22:25

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#1
Have you thought about the open university if you have a toddler to look after? University might get you a better paid job but don't forget the tuition fees etc.
#2
Seconded - Open University is your best option
#3
The first thing is to decide what you want to do (in terms of a job/career) and whether this meets your requirements (potential salary etc) - then find out how to achieve that (education, training etc).

If your chosen career requires a degree then there would be entry requirements that you would have to achieve - in UCAS points which are awarded for A levels, HNC/HNDs. Diplomas etc. If you don't already have these qualifications then you would have to achieve these first.
#4
psychobitchfromhell
Have you thought about the open university if you have a toddler to look after? University might get you a better paid job but don't forget the tuition fees etc.


Thankyou for your reply Hun, I will have a look into that I don't know much about the open university I will have a look now thankyou x
#5
thegog
Seconded - Open University is your best option

Thankyou for your reply I am going to look into this x
#6
If your main aim is to earn enough to give your son private education, it might be a little late, you will need 3 years for the university course, and even time on top of that to get the qualifications to get to university. Add to that basic graduate salary just out of university and they will probably be in late junior school or even senior school before you are earning sufficiently.

Now if you ignore that, I went to uni at 26, was never the plan had coasted through school and had limited qualifications and only went to the uni to keep my wife then girlfriend happy. They signed me up there and then and I came out of the chat as white as a sheet and tried the next week, freshers week to get out of it. It was the best thing I ever did, opened more doors than I could imagine and only wish I had stuck into school and did it sooner.

Would I do it again though in hindsight, at 26 actually not, my degree was in accountancy and I could have qualified without going to university and not necessarily been any worse off. Especially now with tuition fees but those might go this time next week if we believe Labour :)

So my advice would be make sure you get the right course, check what other qualifications are out there. you might find social work is an option but that will require extra study. And lastly don't think it will be plain sailing with a child, it's so hard studying with one it really is.

Good luck.
#7
Van1973
The first thing is to decide what you want to do (in terms of a job/career) and whether this meets your requirements (potential salary etc) - then find out how to achieve that (education, training etc).

If your chosen career requires a degree then there would be entry requirements that you would have to achieve - in UCAS points which are awarded for A levels, HNC/HNDs. Diplomas etc. If you don't already have these qualifications then you would have to achieve these first.


Thankyou for your reply, I have not got a clue what I want to do I have honestly tried so hard to decide I have been to see a careers advisor and I have also completed online careers questionnaires to try and figure out what course is for me,

I just want to better myself education wise and do a degree that can help me in many job roles so whatever job I end up with the degree will help me get a good position hope I'm making sense lol x
#8
Van1973
The first thing is to decide what you want to do (in terms of a job/career) and whether this meets your requirements (potential salary etc) - then find out how to achieve that (education, training etc).

If your chosen career requires a degree then there would be entry requirements that you would have to achieve - in UCAS points which are awarded for A levels, HNC/HNDs. Diplomas etc. If you don't already have these qualifications then you would have to achieve these first.



There are plenty of access courses out there for those that dont have A levels and these can typically be done in about 9 months.
#9
Degrees are well overated and most are complete rubbish. I would rather employ someone with a bit of life experience and common sense rather than a complete numpty with a degree in a subject thats no use to anyone.
#10
philhib1964
Van1973
The first thing is to decide what you want to do (in terms of a job/career) and whether this meets your requirements (potential salary etc) - then find out how to achieve that (education, training etc).
If your chosen career requires a degree then there would be entry requirements that you would have to achieve - in UCAS points which are awarded for A levels, HNC/HNDs. Diplomas etc. If you don't already have these qualifications then you would have to achieve these first.
There are plenty of access courses out there for those that dont have A levels and these can typically be done in about 9 months.

I would even go as far as speaking to the university and seeing if they would take you on without them, many will just because they will get the tuition fees out of you even if you dont go past the first year. However this is a good shout, access courses can be very good especially once you are outside of the normal A level system.
#11
If you are doing a foundation course then that would be an extra year on top of a normal degree. Something like nursing, social work, teaching etc would probably be your best bet at getting a job at the end of it. You will not be earning very much to send your kid to a private school but it would provide enough to look after your kid properly. You could always use your degree to help your kid do better at school.
#12
eslick
If your main aim is to earn enough to give your son private education, it might be a little late, you will need 3 years for the university course, and even time on top of that to get the qualifications to get to university. Add to that basic graduate salary just out of university and they will probably be in late junior school or even senior school before you are earning sufficiently.

Now if you ignore that, I went to uni at 26, was never the plan had coasted through school and had limited qualifications and only went to the uni to keep my wife then girlfriend happy. They signed me up there and then and I came out of the chat as white as a sheet and tried the next week, freshers week to get out of it. It was the best thing I ever did, opened more doors than I could imagine and only wish I had stuck into school and did it sooner.

Would I do it again though in hindsight, at 26 actually not, my degree was in accountancy and I could have qualified without going to university and not necessarily been any worse off. Especially now with tuition fees but those might go this time next week if we believe Labour :)

So my advice would be make sure you get the right course, check what other qualifications are out there. you might find social work is an option but that will require extra study. And lastly don't think it will be plain sailing with a child, it's so hard studying with one it really is.

Good luck.


Thankyou for taking the time out to reply to my question, yes I deeply regret not studying harder whilst I was at school my son is quite clingy so I know it will be hard but I hate being a stay at home mom and just want to better myself education wise so I can give him the best I can, thankyou for your advice I will do more research before joining any courses thankyou x
#13
philhib1964
Degrees are well overated and most are complete rubbish. I would rather employ someone with a bit of life experience and common sense rather than a complete numpty with a degree in a subject thats no use to anyone.


Lol thank you for your reply x
#14
From someone who has interviewed, recruited and sifted through CVs, it's not always about the level of education and the degree. It's also about life experience and personality. I've interviewed someone who's CV was glowing with courses and Uni level education and he was a complete numpty! I am going to Uni later this year (Im about to turn 30) but this is for a specific course that I have worked towards over the last few years (Sign Language Interpreter) however I can continue working alongside this and this is something I'm passionate about becoming.

I think it would be hard to commit if you aren't passionate about the course you are on like you say yourself you like to change your mind. It wouldn't really be worth it to change your mind or hate it and yet be stuck with Uni fees that you have to pay.

Like I say it's not always about the qualifications, employers aren't always looking at just those boxes being ticked. It's who you are as a person. The job I am in now, the hourly rate is more than a nurse gets, but a nurse has paid how much Uni fees vs my zero fees.. not saying it's right, Nurses should get paid far more! But just trying to show you I didn't get this job by having a Degree, it was about what else I could bring to the role.

Good luck with your decision and props to you for wanting to strive and provide better for your little one. :D
#15
Have a look at your local college too. They will have hundreds of different courses on offer. They will all be having open days round about this time of year. Also most larger establishments will have a creche if childcare is an issue. If you loved being a carer, maybe something along the lines of nursing could be an option. Good luck in your quest. My sister had a baby half way through her degree so it is possible to be a mother and a student. She is now an extremely well paid dentist and studying for her third degree.
#16
My stepdaughter didn't do very well at school. A few years ago, she decided to train as a teacher, she needed to retake maths & english GSE's while she was doing the degree. With a lot of hard work & determination she managed to get the degree. But that is only the start, she has been teaching for a few years now, even though she doesn't have any student loans, it has been a hard slog, financially & emotionally.
I am very proud of her, it has been difficult being a single mother with no support from the father. But, even though she is working as a teacher, she still cannot make ends meet financially.
On the other hand, my grandaughter is or was in the second year of Uni, She finished her exams a month ago, & isn't due to go back to uni until september. She actually goes to uni 3 days a week, & then it isn't for a whole day. For this, she will pay £9000 per year.
Apart from the student loans, the difference is that my grandaughter went straight from 6th Form to Uni, which I think makes learning easier, but my step daughter started uni in her 30's
#17
Smaybelline
From someone who has interviewed, recruited and sifted through CVs, it's not always about the level of education and the degree. It's also about life experience and personality. I've interviewed someone who's CV was glowing with courses and Uni level education and he was a complete numpty! I am going to Uni later this year (Im about to turn 30) but this is for a specific course that I have worked towards over the last few years (Sign Language Interpreter) however I can continue working alongside this and this is something I'm passionate about becoming.
I think it would be hard to commit if you aren't passionate about the course you are on like you say yourself you like to change your mind. It wouldn't really be worth it to change your mind or hate it and yet be stuck with Uni fees that you have to pay.
Like I say it's not always about the qualifications, employers aren't always looking at just those boxes being ticked. It's who you are as a person. The job I am in now, the hourly rate is more than a nurse gets, but a nurse has paid how much Uni fees vs my zero fees.. not saying it's right, Nurses should get paid far more! But just trying to show you I didn't get this job by having a Degree, it was about what else I could bring to the role.
Good luck with your decision and props to you for wanting to strive and provide better for your little one. :D

Thankyou so much for your reply I wish you all the best for when you go uni and completing your degree, my OH said the same thing that a degree doesn't always get you a high paying job,

Thankyou very much ❤️
#18
To start university, you will need the relevant A levels or equivalent college qualifications. Do you have A levels? What is your motivation to go to university? To get a well paid job?
#19
psychobitchfromhell
Have a look at your local college too. They will have hundreds of different courses on offer. They will all be having open days round about this time of year. Also most larger establishments will have a creche if childcare is an issue. If you loved being a carer, maybe something along the lines of nursing could be an option. Good luck in your quest. My sister had a baby half way through her degree so it is possible to be a mother and a student. She is now an extremely well paid dentist and studying for her third degree.


Wow your sister did really well, that's really good hope all goes well for her third degree, yes there is a lot of open days coming up and there is a college around the corner from my house so I will definitely look College courses for more experience thankyou x
#20
mutley1
To start university, you will need the relevant A levels or equivalent college qualifications. Do you have A levels? What is your motivation to go to university? To get a well paid job?


I only have two GCESs one in English and one in re, I know I could get into a foundation degree easily but I'm just woundering is it worth going uni.
#21
badboyg
psychobitchfromhell
Have a look at your local college too. They will have hundreds of different courses on offer. They will all be having open days round about this time of year. Also most larger establishments will have a creche if childcare is an issue. If you loved being a carer, maybe something along the lines of nursing could be an option. Good luck in your quest. My sister had a baby half way through her degree so it is possible to be a mother and a student. She is now an extremely well paid dentist and studying for her third degree.
Wow your sister did really well, that's really good hope all goes well for her third degree, yes there is a lot of open days coming up and there is a college around the corner from my house so I will definitely look College courses for more experience thankyou x
She is a serial degree doer. I stopped at one. She does them through open university. I don't think they do it any more but she used to pay for her courses using Tesco club card points.
#22
badboyg
I only have two GCESs one in English and one in re, I know I could get into a foundation degree easily but I'm just woundering is it worth going uni.

i would only advise going to university if you are very bright as there is no point wasting money and time, getting stressed out and fail or get a poor degree which is worth nothing to employers. i see many of my tenants with degrees but they earn very low wages as secretaries or some office assistants. what is the point in that when you have wasted so much time and money and ends up earning less than someone who does not have a degree.

what is your motivation to go to university?
#23
bubblegum2910
My stepdaughter didn't do very well at school. A few years ago, she decided to train as a teacher, she needed to retake maths & english GSE's while she was doing the degree. With a lot of hard work & determination she managed to get the degree. But that is only the start, she has been teaching for a few years now, even though she doesn't have any student loans, it has been a hard slog, financially & emotionally.
I am very proud of her, it has been difficult being a single mother with no support from the father. But, even though she is working as a teacher, she still cannot make ends meet financially.
On the other hand, my grandaughter is or was in the second year of Uni, She finished her exams a month ago, & isn't due to go back to uni until september. She actually goes to uni 3 days a week, & then it isn't for a whole day. For this, she will pay £9000 per year.
Apart from the student loans, the difference is that my grandaughter went straight from 6th Form to Uni, which I think makes learning easier, but my step daughter started uni in her 30's


Thankyou for your reply I really hope things work out well for your step daughter and your granddaughter, it must have been hard for her doing not all being a single parent I hope things work out for her it is brilliant she has become a teacher x
#24
mutley1
badboyg
I only have two GCESs one in English and one in re, I know I could get into a foundation degree easily but I'm just woundering is it worth going uni.

i would only advise going to university if you are very bright as there is no point wasting money and time, getting stressed out and fail or get a poor degree which is worth nothing to employers. i see many of my tenants with degrees but they earn very low wages as secretaries or some office assistants. what is the point in that when you have wasted so much time and money and ends up earning less than someone who does not have a degree.

what is your motivation to go to university?


I think I work better in a job rather then studying if I'm honest, but I have the mentality a degree gets you a better income, I am quite motivated to go university as I feel like if a degree will get me a good job knowing that having a good job will give my son the best lifestyle I can give him
That motivates me
To want to do anything to provide this I hope that makes sense x
#25
badboyg
I think I work better in a job rather then studying if I'm honest, but I have the mentality a degree gets you a better income, I am quite motivated to go university as I feel like if a degree will get me a good job knowing that having a good job will give my son the best lifestyle I can give himThat motivates meTo want to do anything to provide this I hope that makes sense x

I come from a very poor family and I made my money because I am extremely bright so I went to university and got a first class honours degree and so got a very well paid job. But you need to be very bright if you want to make money from getting educated. There is no point in getting an average or poor degree and then not able to perform in your job.

If you have a child to look after and your motivation is to provide for the child there are ways to do this, getting a university degree is not the only answer.

You can get a job and work your way up. If I was not bright, I would have done this as I hate studying. Even if you wanted to go to university, you would have to study something that you are very good at or have a keen interest in. So until you can answer these questions, I would suggest you look at getting a job where you can work your way up or where you can train while working in order to get promotion.
#26
mutley1
badboyg
I think I work better in a job rather then studying if I'm honest, but I have the mentality a degree gets you a better income, I am quite motivated to go university as I feel like if a degree will get me a good job knowing that having a good job will give my son the best lifestyle I can give himThat motivates meTo want to do anything to provide this I hope that makes sense x
I come from a very poor family and I made my money because I am extremely bright so I went to university and got a first class honours degree and so got a very well paid job. But you need to be very bright if you want to make money from getting educated. There is no point in getting an average or poor degree and then not able to perform in your job.
If you have a child to look after and your motivation is to provide for the child there are ways to do this, getting a university degree is not the only answer.
You can get a job and work your way up. If I was not bright, I would have done this as I hate studying. Even if you wanted to go to university, you would have to study something that you are very good at or have a keen interest in. So until you can answer these questions, I would suggest you look at getting a job where you can work your way up or where you can train while working in order to get promotion.


Thank you very much for your reply that does make a lot of sence, as I don't think I'm very bright lol i do prefer the idea of getting a job and working my way up it does sound more promising for me,

Thankyou for your reply x
#27
As others have said..it's not so much about the degree you do, it's about showing the commitment to apply yourself to a task. Look at the degrees available. Many people do degrees in subjects that have no actual use in modern life, yet they get good jobs afterwards.
You say you were a hairdresser, did you qualify at college? Unfortunately, and I don't mean to offend, hairdressing is often seen as the girls 'cop out' from getting a real job or doing a proper vocational course at college. Much like boys and the 'sports science' course.
Give the course some thought, don't get to specific in what you want. A general degree rather than one that is to specialised is better, it will give you an edge in the job market over someone who had a first in some archaic language (for example), as people may see some advantage in employing you.
Best of luck. It's a brave thing to do.


Incidentally, from experience avoid computers and computer languages/programming. I qualified in programming and systems analysis -by the time I'd finished the language was obsolete, the technology obsolete, I was obsolete. I needed retraining. I never bothered. :(
#28
What about an adult apprenticeship?
#29
Lots of good info here but wanted to add from my experience. I self-funded my degree after I had been out of school for a few years. I only had 2 a-levels but was able to get on to a good course as I had relevant work experience, a good reference letter and had to pass an interview.

I got a great degree which has allowed me to earn a lot more than I was before, however I had about 40k in student loans and personal debt upon graduation. It took me 10 years to clear that and I was close to personal bankruptcy.

Even though I have a science degree it was only a gateway into my industry, and not in any way vocational.

This is the main point I would raise from reading your post: although some degrees are vocational as mentioned (ie: nursing), I would say most degrees don't give you the skills to walk into a specific job. You may be starting higher up the ladder but will still have to graft and get a break.

A degree will only open doors for you if it relates to your career choice, so it's important to do something you're passionate about.

Definitely do it if you have a thirst for knowledge, but be aware it's not a certainty that you'll walk in to a well paid job.

I'm aware that this might be a bit negative, it's not my intention to put you off. If you can do it, do it, as it can really enrich your life from both an academic and social perspective.

Doing a foundation year could be really good, as it will gear you up for learning and get you the credits you need for degree entry. Also I believe some vocational courses (which could be more suitable) also require this level for applicants.

My info is a little old but I went through the UCAS system and looked at foundation years as I wasn't sure if I had the grades for a degree.

Maybe step one is working out what you want to do for a career, before kicking off any studies.

Finally, a friend is looking at OU and I'd say it could be perfect.

Hope this helps!!!
#30
badboyg
Thank you very much for your reply that does make a lot of sence, as I don't think I'm very bright lol i do prefer the idea of getting a job and working my way up it does sound more promising for me,Thankyou for your reply x

Young people go to university because it is expected of them and they know nothing better. They also go for the experience and can't be bothered to do any work when they get there. They are only there for the fun of it!

My husband is a university lecturer and he sees lots of students who should not be at university as they are so dumb and will get no where with their degree. No one will employ them when they graduate as they will fail or their degree is so poor, it gets laughed at. They will be lucky to get a job as a cashier at tescos and sainsburys, which they could have done many years ago if they had not wasted their time and money going to uni.

Look for a job that you like to do and motivate yourself to work hard to get promotion. You can also look for jobs that will train you so that you can get better pay once trained, and in the mean time you still earn a wage.

If you are not bright, then tune up your people skills as this is just as important when you go into the work environment and people skills are a lot easier to obtain than academic excellence.

Try to get a job in the public sector as they often offer training and promotion with long service.
#31
Don't know if it has been posted, but the deadline for ucas entry for this September was January, so realistically the earliest you could start is September 2018, or that's what I'm led to believe. Good luck.
#32
mutley1
badboyg
Thank you very much for your reply that does make a lot of sence, as I don't think I'm very bright lol i do prefer the idea of getting a job and working my way up it does sound more promising for me,Thankyou for your reply x
Young people go to university because it is expected of them and they know nothing better. They also go for the experience and can't be bothered to do any work when they get there. They are only there for the fun of it!
My husband is a university lecturer and he sees lots of students who should not be at university as they are so dumb and will get no where with their degree. No one will employ them when they graduate as they will fail or their degree is so poor, it gets laughed at. They will be lucky to get a job as a cashier at tescos and sainsburys, which they could have done many years ago if they had not wasted their time and money going to uni.
Look for a job that you like to do and motivate yourself to work hard to get promotion. You can also look for jobs that will train you so that you can get better pay once trained, and in the mean time you still earn a wage.
If you are not bright, then tune up your people skills as this is just as important when you go into the work environment and people skills are a lot easier to obtain than academic excellence.
Try to get a job in the public sector as they often offer training and promotion with long service.
My husband was a university lecturer. He reckoned these days they should just print degrees on the back of the birth certificate to save time and effort. That being said, massive respect to OP for wanting to better herself.
#33
I'm going to go into quite a bit of depth here. Oddly, I started off with your aim at 18, went through Uni etc, and I'm now 32 with a 2 year old also wondering if we can afford private (or if we even want to). I've looked back and considered whether Uni was right too. So in essence, I can give you perspective on the 'went to Uni route'.

TLDR
Don't bother with a full time degree. Find something you enjoy (or just like) that you can grow - build a business up.
Potentially even start selling goods on eBay - there's many people who earn a very good amount of money (£30k-£100k+) who have built up businesses around their home life. Just don't "buy" or "invest" in a 'business package'!
If you do want to gain qualifications for a specific job, look at local colleges and the Open University - as others have said.
You get paid for the level of responsibility you have - remember that.


Do I Need A Degree?
No, unless you want to go into a specialised field (medical, architecture, etc) - of which there are less and less that place a requirement or a high value on a degree.

That said, after a 7 year architecture course, you can still struggle to find a job.
(oh and you've just graduated with £50k-£80k+ of debt!)

A degree simply demonstrates the level at which you can work

Sometimes you may learn things at University. On many courses, the material is out-dated and not applicable in the working world. Some are better than others - it's a bit pot luck unfortunately as you can't see the content of a 3 year course until you're doing it.

Will A Degree Give Me Better Chances At A Highly Paid Job?
No. Unless you're going for one of those specialised fields that requires a degree.

I've interviewed (literally) hundreds of people and the view I have (as with many others) is that there are amazing people with degrees and amazing people without degrees. There are also people who are terrible with degrees and without degrees too. It's down to a individuals.

Finally, as others have pointed out - it's EXPERIENCE that counts whenever you apply for a job anywhere, at any level.

Do People With Degrees Earn More?
We're told they do, but this is skewed by high paying sectors that require a degree (e.g. doctors). This is where the fabled "get a degree, earn more" faff comes from.
Within each sector if you compare how much people with or without degrees earn, then it's usually about the same on average.

Why? Because it simply comes down to how competent you are.

The more competent you are and the more responsibility you take on, the more you get paid.
If you're not competent and don't want to take on responsibility, you won't get paid much.


Full Time Uni Could Set You Back In Lifetime Earnings
Consider this - I spent 4 years at Uni to get a Masters. I came out with a debt of £18k (no support from parents, etc) - and this was pre tuition fee rise. So I paid about £1300 a year. Not £7000 a year or £9000 a year.

My first job paid £24k - not bad out of uni.
But if I'd gone straight into industry, over those four years I'd have earnt around £60k-£76k in total. But I came out of Uni after 4 years with £18k of debt, so I was potentially £94.5k down on lifetime earnings.
There's a big question there as to whether I'd earn at least that money back by getting paid more money due to having a degree - and that answer is NO for me and my field of work!.

Enjoy your job? Earn a lot? Or both?
It's far easier to find a job you enjoy than it is to earn a lot. It's even harder to have a job you truly enjoy and earn a lot.
Trust me, even if you get paid a lot for a job you hate - you can only last so long, and it shows to people you work with if you don't like your work. Additionally, you'll likely struggle to excel at a job you don't enjoy, hence less chance of promotions, pay rises, opportunities, etc.

If you're looking at committing time to Uni or studying, you better be fairly sure you enjoy it - otherwise you'll loose motivation. That said, you'll never find out unless you try!
(There's an interesting point about successful people simply being people to 'try more things'. Just like 'luck' tends to 'favour' people who have a positive disposition and try new things...!)


Why Do Some Jobs Or Roles Pay More?
This is really simple but overlooked. The more responsibility you have, the more you get paid (in general).
This is why MD's and CEO's who people think "do nothing" get paid so much - the decisions they make can literally make-or-break a business and put dozens or thousands of people out of a job and they could land in jail (in certain circumstances).

So if you want to earn a lot, look at jobs/roles where there's a higher level of responsibility. This even includes running your own business.

How To Get Raises/Promotions
You have to ask. You don't ask, you usually don't get.
You have to ideally work with your manager/employer to have a 'plan' for you to taken on additional responsibilities (as this usually leads to more money). Don't just expect things to happen.
People think that just asking for more money works - it doesn't really. Or if you get something, it's not as much as it could have been. Or it's a long fight for it to go through with both sides not happy with the outcome.
So what do you do? Ideally you've set expectations about the fact you want to take on more responsibility, and you've taken more on.
There will be a point where you can raise the subject of recognising your extra responsibility and critically the chance to highlight the extra responsibility you've taken on since your last increase (or when they hired you). It's really hard to argue with that, compared to "I'd like more money please, because I think I should get some".
Finally, businesses budget for salary increases (and bonuses) in some way - so if you haven't set expectations with the business, they can't try and budget (that year) to potentially give you more. Otherwise, they'll have to try to 'find' the money from somewhere else - which means giving you more money will be a much harder task.
If there are set points in the year that pay reviews are done, work towards those - highlight your achievements a month or two before...:)


How Much (More) Do You Need To Earn For Private School?
This one is interesting:
Step 1 - Go and download the MoneySavingExpert Budgeting Spreadsheet.
Step 2 - Fill it in with your current incomings (e.g. salary after tax) and outgoing (all bills, and expenditure).
Step 3 - Use the "target" column to put in how much you would like to spend (rather than save), so put in £xx,xxx for Private School, etc.
Step 4 - See how much it says you'll need as a complete budget
Step 5 - Work out how much you need to earn before tax to have that amount of money in the bank to spend on those things.

As guidance, most private schools cost £7k-£20k per year, depending on where they are and the age of the child (it gets more expensive as they get older).

This means earning at least £8.5k to £24k extra in salary at 20% tax, or £10.5 to £28k in salary at 40% tax.
(approx figures)


Is Private School Worth It?
This is something to seriously consider. There are some really good state schools - it can often be cheaper to move house to another area than pay for private.
(look at state and also private school league tables, some private schools perform worse than the top end of state schools in some areas!)

In general private schools give you access to better facilities, smaller class sizes and better connections.
If a child isn't also supported well at home, then they'll still struggle - but at least there's more support for them.

Overall, kids get better education, better results and in general have better chances due to this - IF going down the academic route AND if they're well supported at home to make the most of their education opportunity.

The relationships you build can also be very useful - in fact, this can be a contributing factor to success in later life.
(e.g. Tarquins dad - your best mate from school, who happened to own a multi-million pound company, gave you your first job out of Uni. etc etc)


So....
I went down the Uni route, did very well academically and have done well since. Still can't afford private school.
(bearing in mind this is in an industry with high demand and decent pay)


Hairdressing?
Finally, I've got a friend who changed from being a brickie to a hairdresser, he now runs his own small salon and he does quite well out of that! (He is an amazing hairdresser and wins many competitions).
I know you hated but it could be somewhere to start, being a mobile hairdresser has little startup costs and you've got the experience/skills now. You could build a client list, rent a chair in a salon, maybe rent your own place in the future a bit with two spare chairs you could rent to other hairdressers...over time....who knows!
(probably sell the business and then do something you enjoy more....!)
#34
mutley1
Young people go to university because it is expected of them and they know nothing better. They also go for the experience and can't be bothered to do any work when they get there.

Ah yes 'young people', lets put them all together. Some degrees are a bit of a waste of space - I agree.
Some aren't, some require 30-40+ hours per week lecture and study.

I can tell you this, 'work' is far (far) easier than my degree/Masters was. And I get paid to work, not the other way around!
#35
psychobitchfromhell
My husband was a university lecturer. He reckoned these days they should just print degrees on the back of the birth certificate to save time and effort. That being said, massive respect to OP for wanting to better herself.

I help my husband put the marks on to the system and some of the marks are just laughable. 13%, what is the point in going to university when all you can achieve is 13%? even my labrador could get a higher mark if he tried!

Universities nowadays are all about bum on seats and their standards of entry has dropped to pitiful. Having said that, there are some very bright students in my husband's class, who gets 97% marks so there is a huge differential in ability. It means that brighter students have to put up being hindered by idiots in the class who do not understand and keep taking up my husband's time when his time is better spent with the brighter students.
#36
Skyhiigh
Ah yes 'young people', lets put them all together. Some degrees are a bit of a waste of space - I agree.Some aren't, some require 30-40+ hours per week lecture and study.I can tell you this, 'work' is far (far) easier than my degree/Masters was. And I get paid to work, not the other way around!

i found my degree was a lot harder than my job. in comparison, my job was a walk in the park. the irony of it all, is that i learnt nothing from my degree. i could have done my job without my degree, but i would not even be considered for the job if i did not have the degree.
#37
mutley1
psychobitchfromhell
My husband was a university lecturer. He reckoned these days they should just print degrees on the back of the birth certificate to save time and effort. That being said, massive respect to OP for wanting to better herself.
I help my husband put the marks on to the system and some of the marks are just laughable. 13%, what is the point in going to university when all you can achieve is 13%? even my labrador could get a higher mark if he tried!
Universities nowadays are all about bum on seats and their standards of entry has dropped to pitiful. Having said that, there are some very bright students in my husband's class, who gets 97% marks so there is a huge differential in ability. It means that brighter students have to put up being hindered by idiots in the class who do not understand and keep taking up my husband's time when his time is better spent with the brighter students.
Yeah. I remember one my husband showed me. They had written the question number and drawn a picture. Needless to say they did not get 100%
#38
mutley1
badboyg
Thank you very much for your reply that does make a lot of sence, as I don't think I'm very bright lol i do prefer the idea of getting a job and working my way up it does sound more promising for me,Thankyou for your reply x
Young people go to university because it is expected of them and they know nothing better. They also go for the experience and can't be bothered to do any work when they get there. They are only there for the fun of it!
My husband is a university lecturer and he sees lots of students who should not be at university as they are so dumb and will get no where with their degree. No one will employ them when they graduate as they will fail or their degree is so poor, it gets laughed at. They will be lucky to get a job as a cashier at tescos and sainsburys, which they could have done many years ago if they had not wasted their time and money going to uni.
Look for a job that you like to do and motivate yourself to work hard to get promotion. You can also look for jobs that will train you so that you can get better pay once trained, and in the mean time you still earn a wage.
If you are not bright, then tune up your people skills as this is just as important when you go into the work environment and people skills are a lot easier to obtain than academic excellence.
Try to get a job in the public sector as they often offer training and promotion with long service.
Wow lost count of how many insults were in there... and i am bright just incase you wish to come out with another insult or patronising comment.

Op uni is what you make it just like everything in life.
#39
There are lots of free short courses to try on the Open University - start there and good luck.
http://www.open.edu/openlearn/free-courses/full-catalogue

Edited By: caroline777upnorth on Jun 02, 2017 22:25
#40
caroline777upnorth
There are lots of free short courses to try on the Open University - start there and good luck. http://www.open.edu/openlearn/free-courses/full-catalogue


Thankyou Caroline I will have a look at that thankyou x

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