Any PC's better then this? - HotUKDeals
We use cookie files to improve site functionality and personalisation. By continuing to use HUKD, you accept our cookie and privacy policy.
Get the HUKD app free at Google Play

Search Error

An error occurred when searching, please try again!

Login / Sign UpSubmit
Expired

Any PC's better then this?

Kzeove Avatar
9y, 5m agoPosted 9 years, 5 months ago
http://www.comet.co.uk/cometbrowse/product.do?sku=398551

Brand HP
Processor Intel Core 2 Duo
Processor model number E4620
Processor speed tbc
Processor bus tbc
Processor cache tbc
Memory (RAM) 2048 MB
Storage (hard drive) 320 GB
Optical drive Plays & records CDs and DVDs
2nd optical drive Not featured
Lightscribe technology Yes
Blu-Ray compatible No
HD compatible No
Operating system Windows Vista Home Premium
Application software MicrosoftWorks
Shared graphics Not featured
Dynamic graphics Not featured
Dedicated graphics ATI Radeon X1650SE 512 MB
Dual graphics card Not featured
USB 2.0 slots 6
Firewire Yes
Media card slots 15 in 1
Remote control Not featured
Watch & record live TV Not featured
Keyboard Wired
Mouse Wired
Sound card Not included
Speakers Not included
Built-in monitor Not included
Stand alone monitor Not included
Bluetooth Not featured
Built-in webcam Not featured
Small form factor No
Other features
VIIV technology
10/100 wired networking built-in
Dual layer & +/- DVD recording
SATA storage
3 PCI card slots
B Power rating
C Entertainment rating
2.13GHz Processor clock speed


£780

Thanks

Kev
Tags:
Kzeove Avatar
9y, 5m agoPosted 9 years, 5 months ago
Options

All Responses

(41) Jump to unreadPost an answer
Responses/page:
Page:
#1
Price doesn't look that amazing to me, what do you plan to use the pc for?
#2
Its for my GF, she wants a really high spec PC to keep her goind for a long time:

- Not DELL!
- Under £800
- Preferably not an online shop, unless the deal is really good.

Its gonna have to handle things such us video capturing and all that, as she is doing a media degree, hence the large specs.

Thanks

Kev
#3
Also, she DEFO wants the monitor, so she dont mind getting just a tower, and buying the monitor elsewhere.

Kev
#4
Why not Dell? :?
#5
considered going to mac? ideal for her needs
[mod]#6
Mattitude
Why not Dell? :?


Same question......you'd get a much better spec for your money there.
#7
why not dell? .. you get the best price at dell and there computers last

stupid going to anyone else if you ask me

certainly would never get a HP

speak to that mike bloke who deals with dells.. im sure u can get a very decent system for 800!!
#8
The same PC (without monitor) is available at john lewis for £630 with free delivery and 2yr warranty.
#9
tbh theres two choices in the computer market.... build it or buy it, if its the latter ill go dell.....
#10
Check out an imac. Most stable for video and design.Also NO viruses!!
#11
The specs arent that great, and check out whatever software her degree course is using works in Vista.

Personally think people should take the half an hour out their lives and learn to build them themselves, but for the lazy then yea, your as well going for Dell.

Dell Dimension 9200

Intel® Core™ 2 Duo E6600 Processor (2.4GHz,1066MHz,4MB cache)
Genuine Windows Vista™ Home Premium - English
Collect & Return, 1 Year Service only
Dell™ 20" Black Wide Flat Panel (E207WFP) - UK/Irish
2048MB 667MHz Dual Channel DDR2 SDRAM [2x1024]
320GB Serial ATA RAID 0 Stripe [2x160GB 7200rpm drives with DataBurst™ cache]
256MB nVidia™ GeForce 8600GTS graphics card
16X DVD+/-RW Drive
Dell™ Enhanced USB Multimedia Keyboard - UK/Irish (QWERTY)
Dell 2 Button USB Scroll Optical Mouse - Black
IEEE 1394 PCI Adapter card

£792.37

Makes that HP deal look.....well....rubbish
#12
Dell are probably the best in my opinion. Anyone who denies it doesn't really know what they're on about.

HP are quite good too (from experience)
#13
Well all friends and family have had problems with Dell, unlike HP & Compaq.

Kev
#14
My family has had 5 Dell pcs over the the last few years and haven't had any problems with any of them.
banned#15
You can't do anything on a mac that you cannot do on a PC for cheaper
#16
am i seeing this wrong?

lets say u take away £250 for a dell ultrasharp 20''

so the tower is £530?

looks like a overpriced setup if u ask me

shame u probably wont go down the self build route but you WILL get alot more for your money

x1650se lol
#17
personal opinion.........
Dell :) am happy with haggled down the dimension e521 w/o monitor offer from £290 to £160
Hp, great for looks but its whats inside..... go to someone you can trust if you dont want a MAC, and get quality parts put in........... if your not tooo sure ask us on the forums and people are more than willing to help you on your way :)
happy hunting...... p.s try and give the dell outlet a shot you never know......
#18
oh....ps COMPAQ i have had to strip down two systems and re-build them due to over heating and poor ventilation cases....... so honest opion one of the following two since its a no dell route----
build one to v.good specs or ...............................
build one to v.good specs...
:)
#19
muffin what deal are you talking about, as the deal that was originally mentioned wasnt a Dell so didnt have the Dell monitor.
The Dell i mentioned didnt have a x1650 it had an 8600GTS.

The HP is £630 for the base, its just a cheap ass monitor.
To threadstarter, Dell monitors are actually pretty good.

Quality wise, HP / Dell / whatever, they are all pre-built and about as much chance of failing as each other.
Dell PC's use unique parts often, but then so do the rest , so theres headaches all round when things go wrong or upgrades are needed.

If you wont self build the Dell's the best you will get.
The Processor and Graphics are both better than the HP.
The Graphics is the newer generation of cards so will last longer, as opposed to the rubbish HP offering. 256/512Mb Graphics memory doesnt make much difference if the card with the 512Mb is slower and unable to use it, so dont lean to the HP for it having more GPU memory as its useless.
#20
Well I think I better talk to my GF about it, as I was never sure of them, but there is alot of positives here lol.

Thanks everyone,

Kev
#21
in$anity
Dell are probably the best in my opinion. Anyone who denies it doesn't really know what they're on about.


You are kidding right? I know there's a total Dell love in round these parts but I know many many people involved with computers at professional and academic levels non of whom would touch a Dell with a 10 foot barge pole.

They're cheap I'll grant you that. But to say they're the best and everyone who thinks otherwise doesn't know what they're talking about is arrogant ignorance of the highest order!
#22
i disagree with the post above..

dell is my opinion are a cut above the rest..

reliable systems and incase they do fail impeccable customer care...

what computer brand what you get instead then megalomaniac???



i would never get a PC from PCworld, Comet or Currys!! all overpriced and useless!
#23
HaggisHunter
Personally think people should take the half an hour out their lives and learn to build them themselves, but for the lazy then yea, your as well going for Dell.


Agreed mate, build it yourself. There's nothing quite like building a custom, hand-selected PC :thumbsup:

This is how I would have spent the money:

http://www.ebuyer.com

http://xs116.xs.to/xs116/07250/PCspec.png

Better components, better price, better spec.

Corsair have an excellent PC building guide: click
#24
findmeabargin
i disagree with the post above..

dell is my opinion are a cut above the rest..

reliable systems and incase they do fail impeccable customer care...

what computer brand what you get instead then megalomaniac???


Personally I build my own but I know that's not everyones cup of tea. As such I obviously don't buy pre-built machines, but I do know Mesh and Evesham are multi-award winning manufacturers worth considering, Mesh are the UK's number one in-fact. I do however take exception the Dell are the best, you're an idiot if you think otherwise type of post from in$anity, as personal preference shouldn't be derided in that manner. Particularly considering, as highlighted by the BBC recently, that Dell have one of the lowest customer satisfaction ratings in the industry, and only HP Compaq score lower.

That's not to say Dell don't have their benefits, they are after all exceedingly cheap and I do wholly endorse their continued support of Windows XP and Linux.

findmeabargin
i would never get a PC from PCworld, Comet or Currys!! all overpriced and useless!


I used to work for Dixons group and would agree completely with that statement, they're useless for PC's and Comet are no better.
#25
megalomaniac
You are kidding right? I know there's a total Dell love in round these parts but I know many many people involved with computers at professional and academic levels non of whom would touch a Dell with a 10 foot barge pole.

They're cheap I'll grant you that. But to say they're the best and everyone who thinks otherwise doesn't know what they're talking about is arrogant ignorance of the highest order!


Those people either know a lot and would therefore build themselves excluding all Manufacturers, or dont know anything at all and cant build themselves meaning they still have to buy crappy pre-builds while pretending to know about PC's.
Happens a lot especially since Universities generally teach you nothing about PC components or assembly. And if they do its generally too out-dated to be of relevance.

About Dell being the best, ******ed if i know.
They are the cheapest and the only way this guy will get a "High-spec PC" for his budget.
With the rest he will go over the £1000 mark easily so theres not much choice.
When it comes to computer service, then generally every company is crap so using that as a basis for purchases is pointless, as its easier taking it to the local PC shop whatever manufacturer it is.
#26
megalomaniac
Personally I build my own but I know that's not everyones cup of tea. As such I obviously don't buy pre-built machines, but I do know Mesh and Evesham are multi-award winning manufacturers worth considering, Mesh are the UK's number one in-fact. I do however take exception the Dell are the best, you're an idiot if you think otherwise type of post from in$anity, as personal preference shouldn't be derided in that manner. Particularly considering, as highlighted by the BBC recently, that Dell have one of the lowest customer satisfaction ratings in the industry, and only HP Compaq score lower.

That's not to say Dell don't have their benefits, they are after all exceedingly cheap and I do wholly endorse their continued support of Windows XP and Linux.



I used to work for Dixons group and would agree completely with that statement, they're useless for PC's and Comet are no better.



MESH? You have to be kidding.. They are horriffic at customer services & have even been featured on watchdog for cutting corners.
#27
seancampbell
MESH? You have to be kidding.. They are horriffic at customer services & have even been featured on watchdog for cutting corners.


So have Dell...they're well known for it and had a particularly torrid time in 2005/2006, but they are working hard to improve (as are Mesh).

My point was that Dell were being described as the best, which implies they are a premium brand, that you could not do better than a Dell. That is simply not true, they are very good at what they do, which is sell cheap PC's cheaply and they make no pretence of being anything else. They never have been and never will be the best, they simply aim to be the cheapest, as such they are a value brand plain and simple, to say they are anything else is misleading at best.

As for Mesh, if you pick up any PC magazine up off a newsagents shelves then chances are there will be a Mesh PC in there somewhere winning an award and they are the UK's leading build to order PC supplier, so plenty must like them. So ok, their customer service can be a bit lacking, but then Dell's record isn't great either. A quick search on either company will result in a deluge of complaints from dissatisfied customers, you get what you pay for I'm afraid. They're both still better than DSG and both are working hard to improve their reputations.

HaggisHunter
Those people either know a lot and would therefore build themselves excluding all Manufacturers, or dont know anything at all and cant build themselves meaning they still have to buy crappy pre-builds while pretending to know about PC's.
Happens a lot especially since Universities generally teach you nothing about PC components or assembly. And if they do its generally too out-dated to be of relevance.


Or they don't have time to build their own.....Either way my argument was with Dell being described as the best with it being implied anyone who thought otherwise was an idiot. Being the best is not something Dell aspire too, they are happy being cheap knowing full well most don't see the benefit in buying anything better. Anyway I believe I said professionals and academics not just academics, and FYI they wouldn't buy Mesh or Evesham either :giggle: they're not even in the same league as what I or they would consider for our own machines. But we're not talking about a machine for us are we, that's a whole different kettle of fish and would scare the pants off most people :thumbsup:

HaggisHunter
About Dell being the best, ******ed if i know.
They are the cheapest and the only way this guy will get a "High-spec PC" for his budget.
With the rest he will go over the £1000 mark easily so theres not much choice.
When it comes to computer service, then generally every company is crap so using that as a basis for purchases is pointless, as its easier taking it to the local PC shop whatever manufacturer it is.


Agreed for the most part, that was kind of my point. To say you should consider Dell as they're pretty damn cheap is fine but to effectively say you should buy a Dell they're the best and anyone who thinks otherwise doesn't know what they're talking about is not helpful at all.

Anyway to Kzeove; you should look at all your options. Be it Dell, Mesh, Evesham, PC World etc. and work out what's best for you. Dell will be very competitively priced and are worth a look, as are Mesh and Evesham. On the high street you could probably knock PC World and co down a bit on price if you haggle, John Lewis are worth a look as they offer 2 year warranties on all their Computers which most other places will charge you £££'s for. My best advice though is that you can save money by looking online, even if it is just to use the information as a haggling tool. Also you should look for someone who offers an on-site warranty, otherwise you could be without your PC for a while if you have a problem.

p.s. If your g/f's doing a media degree she probably should consider a Mac, Apple give huge academic discounts and that's exactly the sort of thing Mac's are best at.
banned#28
Personally - I'd say build it. Your girlfriend will appreciate and idiolise you for building her system.

Dell are awful by the way. Ok for very young, elderly and those who see things as "Bigger numbers means it's better!". However if you have any experiance or knowledge...Dell are like a cancer of the computer world.
#29
One of my friend says that Dell PC self com bust? is this true? I asked one my teachers and they said there home PC from dell just blew one day and they replaced it with a NEC.
#30
No way are dell the best ... not by a long stretch of the imagination. Sure they are fine for people who just want their pc to do as it should ... but the minute you might want to start thinking about upgrading parts on the machine you MIGHT just be stuck with a pretty out of date and useless system in 2 or 3 years as they tend to *******ise and personalise all of the components in the machine to make it hard/impossible to just upgrade.
#31
megalomaniac
Or they don't have time to build their own.....


Theres no such thing, thats just an excuse :whistling:
I mean ask anyone who's built a PC. The most time consuming part of the job is taking the parts out of their individual packaging lol.
Once its out, its essentially a jigsaw puzzle with a dozen parts.
5-10 minutes putting it together, maybe 30 minutes setting it up as you like, and the jobs done in an hour tops from opening the mail envelopes :thumbsup:

Crofter,

Its more than just Dell that personalise components.
Seen a few different folk using BTX in their cases for example, its not just Dell, and your knackered if you want to upgrade various things.

About the Mac idea..... check the course.
You dont want her to be the only person on the course with a Mac, and depending on the course it is often suited around the system most people will have ie a Windows PC.
Could cause hassle with joint courseworks etc with people using Windows PC's.

Personally i say Dell.
Cheaper, and you cant really pick an HP because of its reliability lol.
#32
Proximo
You can't do anything on a mac that you cannot do on a PC for cheaper



yeah including catching loads of viruses and dealing with loads of system crashes....oh and try running multiple applications on most pc's at once
#33
HaggisHunter
Theres no such thing, thats just an excuse :whistling:
I mean ask anyone who's built a PC. The most time consuming part of the job is taking the parts out of their individual packaging lol.
Once its out, its essentially a jigsaw puzzle with a dozen parts.
5-10 minutes putting it together, maybe 30 minutes setting it up as you like,
and the jobs done in an hour tops from opening the mail envelopes :thumbsup:


LOL there is such a thing as not enough time, if you have a busy life, a job, friends, kids etc. but I'm guessing you wouldn't know about any of that :giggle:.

Besides that's a serious underestimate of time, it takes longer than 30 minutes to just install Windows never mind configure it too. Mind if you really knew what you were talking about you'd probably be installing multiple OS's on your own PC anyway. If you are doing it properly it will take you longer than that, unless you're some guy on a production line slotting bits in as they fly by. You have to screw everything in place securely for a start, unless you spend a fortune on a screwless case of course. You need to take anti-static precautions when handling sensitive components, unless you enjoy damaging your components and the system instability's that can cause. You have to install the PSU (easy, usually four screws and done - but then pretty much everything else connects to it), motherboard (needs to be secure as everything else plugs into it), CPU (can be very fiddly fitting the heat sink properly as they tend to be a tight fit), graphics card, sound card (as we all know real computer geeks don't do on-board, right :thumbsup:), HDD, DVD/CD drive etc. You have to wire up the case and components, configure (and update if you have any sense) your bios, install an OS , assuming it's Windows you have to download all the security updates - that takes a while even on a quick connection, install the latest drivers for all your hardware, install all your software etc etc.

You could not get a PC 100% up and running in the time you're suggesting, you might be able to throw something half arsed together, or put together a shell and a whack an image on ready for selling if you do it for a living, but you couldn't do the job properly and get everything setup how you like it and fully up to date.

You know it's funny, I've never received any computer components in "mail envelopes", I think they might not survive the delivery if that were the case. :giggle:

HaggisHunter
About the Mac idea..... check the course.
You dont want her to be the only person on the course with a Mac, and depending on the course it is often suited around the system most people will have ie a Windows PC.
Could cause hassle with joint courseworks etc with people using Windows PC's.


Now I'm a PC man through and through but there's nothing you can do in Windows you couldn't do on a Mac if you wanted, well other than having a Virus cripple your machine of course, lol. With the likes of iLife coming free on new Mac's you're good to go with professional Media editing out of the box, personally I think a Mac is the best suggestion I've seen on here by far.
#34
megalomaniac
LOL there is such a thing as not enough time, if you have a busy life, a job, friends, kids etc. but I'm guessing you wouldn't know about any of that :giggle:.

Besides that's a serious underestimate of time, it takes longer than 30 minutes to just install Windows never mind configure it too. Mind if you really knew what you were talking about you'd probably be installing multiple OS's on your own PC anyway. If you are doing it properly it will take you longer than that, unless you're some guy on a production line slotting bits in as they fly by. You have to screw everything in place securely for a start, unless you spend a fortune on a screwless case of course. You need to take anti-static precautions when handling sensitive components, unless you enjoy damaging your components and the system instability's that can cause. You have to install the PSU (easy, usually four screws and done - but then pretty much everything else connects to it), motherboard (needs to be secure as everything else plugs into it), CPU (can be very fiddly fitting the heat sink properly as they tend to be a tight fit), graphics card, sound card (as we all know real computer geeks don't do on-board, right :thumbsup:), HDD, DVD/CD drive etc. You have to wire up the case and components, configure (and update if you have any sense) your bios, install an OS , assuming it's Windows you have to download all the security updates - that takes a while even on a quick connection, install the latest drivers for all your hardware, install all your software etc etc.

You could not get a PC 100% up and running in the time you're suggesting, you might be able to throw something half arsed together, or put together a shell and a whack an image on ready for selling if you do it for a living, but you couldn't do the job properly and get everything setup how you like it and fully up to date.

You know it's funny, I've never received any computer components in "mail envelopes", I think they might not survive the delivery if that were the case. :giggle:



Now I'm a PC man through and through but there's nothing you can do in Windows you couldn't do on a Mac if you wanted, well other than having a Virus cripple your machine of course, lol. With the likes of iLife coming free on new Mac's you're good to go with professional Media editing out of the box, personally I think a Mac is the best suggestion I've seen on here by far.



well said:thumbsup:
#35
megalomaniac
LOL there is such a thing as not enough time, if you have a busy life, a job, friends, kids etc. but I'm guessing you wouldn't know about any of that :giggle:.

Besides that's a serious underestimate of time, it takes longer than 30 minutes to just install Windows never mind configure it too. Mind if you really knew what you were talking about you'd probably be installing multiple OS's on your own PC anyway. If you are doing it properly it will take you longer than that, unless you're some guy on a production line slotting bits in as they fly by. You have to screw everything in place securely for a start, unless you spend a fortune on a screwless case of course. You need to take anti-static precautions when handling sensitive components, unless you enjoy damaging your components and the system instability's that can cause. You have to install the PSU (easy, usually four screws and done - but then pretty much everything else connects to it), motherboard (needs to be secure as everything else plugs into it), CPU (can be very fiddly fitting the heat sink properly as they tend to be a tight fit), graphics card, sound card (as we all know real computer geeks don't do on-board, right :thumbsup:), HDD, DVD/CD drive etc. You have to wire up the case and components, configure (and update if you have any sense) your bios, install an OS , assuming it's Windows you have to download all the security updates - that takes a while even on a quick connection, install the latest drivers for all your hardware, install all your software etc etc.

You could not get a PC 100% up and running in the time you're suggesting, you might be able to throw something half arsed together, or put together a shell and a whack an image on ready for selling if you do it for a living, but you couldn't do the job properly and get everything setup how you like it and fully up to date.

You know it's funny, I've never received any computer components in "mail envelopes", I think they might not survive the delivery if that were the case. :giggle:



Now I'm a PC man through and through but there's nothing you can do in Windows you couldn't do on a Mac if you wanted, well other than having a Virus cripple your machine of course, lol. With the likes of iLife coming free on new Mac's you're good to go with professional Media editing out of the box, personally I think a Mac is the best suggestion I've seen on here by far.


Work 3x12hr days a Week, Uni the other 2, and try to fit in a girlfriend and friends around that.
Nah its easy.

The talk through of putting components in and preventing static, screwing things securely etc.
It doesnt take long and these measures take an extra 5 seconds per component than it would if u did it half-arsed.
Hell i got offered a job in the local shop, and the guide was building say 20 boxes in 2 hours ie 6 minutes each( thought that was bit impossible anyway). Doing your own i'd give yourself 10.

If its XP it isnt that long, and it wont take over the half hour.
XP updates are generally all mince anyway, especially if you have protection setup already and know what your doing online in regards to downloading etc.
The vast majority of security issues are just idiots downloading viruses.
20 minutes to update a few drivers and add the few home touches.

I didnt bother adding in time for installing programs as this is essentially a comparison to store bought PC's and you will have to install your own programs anyway. In fact you will have to update all the drivers and possibly repartition/reformat when you get a store bought anyway.
So you are possibly only saving on hardware building time.
10 minutes if you know what to do.
If you dont know what to do, google for half an hour and maybe half an hour to build. After the first time, it wont take nearly as long.

The cables can come in envelopes.
Besides, if the parts in a small box, it can fit in an envelope.
Envelopes/boxes its all the same type of thing (packaging), and is what i was referring to.

As for the last point, theres an argument for, theres nothing you can do on Mac that you cant do on Windows.
When a windows pc is cheaper and often more familiar, its an easier choice especially for a student.
Also with the question of transferal of data. If shes working on Mac at home on a project, it could be a pain if the course she is on uses PC's. Most folk use USB sticks and work on projects in class then finish at home. Could be a headache if different software is used on the different platforms.
I mean the Uni could be on a version older than XP still, you never know so its worth checking.
And anyway, Viruses shouldnt be a Mac selling point. Ive been PC for years, and never had a virus. Its not due to not downloading or not using the internets, god knows i'm never off it and downloaded more than my fair share, its just from common sense.
Its not the machine its the user.
Basically Mac are saying if your too stupid to use PC use Mac :p
(not saying Mac users are stupid, im just referring to the Mac adverts)

Oh and ive tried multiple OS's but i just cant justify keeping them as i end up never using them.
#36
HaggisHunter
Work 3x12hr days a Week, Uni the other 2, and try to fit in a girlfriend and friends around that.
Nah its easy.


Good luck to you, the fact remains that some people just don't have time to build their own. If it comes down to spending a night with your partner, playing with the kids or building a PC then I assure you that not many people would choose the PC.

HaggisHunter
The talk through of putting components in and preventing static, screwing things securely etc.
It doesnt take long and these measures take an extra 5 seconds per component than it would if u did it half-arsed.
Hell i got offered a job in the local shop, and the guide was building say 20 boxes in 2 hours ie 6 minutes each( thought that was bit impossible anyway). Doing your own i'd give yourself 10.


Maybe it does take the guy at the local shop 6 minutes to build one, but that wont have any software on it. Not that it really matters anyway, or did you forget we're trying to help someone out here that hasn't built a PC before. It's not a competition, it doesn't matter in the slightest how long it would take you or I to build one as it's going to take a first timer a lot longer.

HaggisHunter
If its XP it isnt that long, and it wont take over the half hour.
XP updates are generally all mince anyway, especially if you have protection setup already and know what your doing online in regards to downloading etc.
The vast majority of security issues are just idiots downloading viruses.
20 minutes to update a few drivers and add the few home touches.


I'm sorry, I'm trying to be nice here but that's one of the most irresposible things I've heard. Most Windows critical updates address flaws in the operating system itself, flaws that hackers could exploit to bypass even professional grade security. These are not just little patches to prevent inexperienced users running vbs attachments in emails or installing Trojans, these are things that give security experts massive headaches never mind Joe public.

HaggisHunter
I didnt bother adding in time for installing programs as this is essentially a comparison to store bought PC's and you will have to install your own programs anyway. In fact you will have to update all the drivers and possibly repartition/reformat when you get a store bought anyway.


You or I might reformat an off the shelf machine but let's face it, most people would just use it as it comes, some might even remove some of the pre-installed rubbish but not everyone will.

HaggisHunter
So you are possibly only saving on hardware building time.
10 minutes if you know what to do.
If you dont know what to do, google for half an hour and maybe half an hour to build. After the first time, it wont take nearly as long.


Yes but it is his first time isn't it, so it is going to take a lot longer than it would take us!

HaggisHunter
The cables can come in envelopes.
Besides, if the parts in a small box, it can fit in an envelope.
Envelopes/boxes its all the same type of thing (packaging), and is what i was referring to.


Ok I'll admit that was a cheap shot :giggle: hehe

HaggisHunter
As for the last point, theres an argument for, theres nothing you can do on Mac that you cant do on Windows.
When a windows pc is cheaper and often more familiar, its an easier choice especially for a student.


Not really Mac OSX is very intuative, and probably has no more of a learning curve for a non power user who's used Windows XP than Windows Vista does, which is what you'll get stuck with if you buy a new PC. Besides if the worst comes to the worst and you really need something that only works in Windows (which is increasingly unlikely these days) then you can run Windows on a Mac anyway, either via duel boot or virtualisation software like Parallels Desktop.

Also like I said Apple give huge discounts to students, it equates to around 25% off on some products.

HaggisHunter
Also with the question of transferal of data. If shes working on Mac at home on a project, it could be a pain if the course she is on uses PC's. Most folk use USB sticks and work on projects in class then finish at home. Could be a headache if different software is used on the different platforms.


Plug pretty much anything into a Mac be it a USB stick, printer, digital camcorder or whatever and chances are it'll just work, no messing around trying to find the latest drivers like you sometimes have to do with Windows. There's a lot of industry leading media editing software availible for Mac, but like I said iLife (including iPhoto, iMovie, iDVD, GarageBand and iWeb) is professional standard and free with a Mac, and it supports all major format standards, for example iMovie video format support includes DV, DV Widescreen, iSight, MPEG-4 (Simple Profile), and HDV (720p & 1080i) among others.

HaggisHunter
I mean the Uni could be on a version older than XP still, you never know so its worth checking.


Yes it is worth checking what the uni/course uses, I'd be very surprised if they didn't have some Macs though with it being a Media course.

HaggisHunter
And anyway, Viruses shouldnt be a Mac selling point. Ive been PC for years, and never had a virus. Its not due to not downloading or not using the internets, god knows i'm never off it and downloaded more than my fair share, its just from common sense.
Its not the machine its the user.
Basically Mac are saying if your too stupid to use PC use Mac :p
(not saying Mac users are stupid, im just referring to the Mac adverts)


*Sigh* yes you are. Look just because the likes of you and I know how to keep 100% virus free doesn't mean everyone does. That's not to say they are stupid, they just don't understand computers to the same level. You can't go saying someone's an idiot because they get a virus and you know more about computers than them, that's like a mechanic calling you an idiot because you can't service your own car or a plumber calling you a fool because can't fix a leaking stopcock. It's just a matter of experience and training.

That's why Mac's being more secure is a big selling point, because many people don't know and either don't have the time or the inclination to learn how to better protect themselves. Why should they when they don't have to, people will usually take the easy route.

HaggisHunter
Oh and ive tried multiple OS's but i just cant justify keeping them as i end up never using them.


Fair enough, that's personal preference :thumbsup: .
#37
Why not get a 'barebones' base unit and build it up from there, if you know someone who has a bit of PC knowledge shouldn't be a problem.
Try this site for some barebones units
http://www.novatech.co.uk/novatech/barebones.html
#38
Self build is the way to go. So much cheaper and the actual satisfaction you get of building the thing and seeing it running beats any shop deal hands down.
#39
Hmm, may think about self building, I am doing a degree in computing, so could be useful, any links to help?

Kev
#40
Cool, where are you doing your degree?

http://www.buildyourown.org.uk/ should tell you everything you need. It's not very hard to be honest, the most important thing in my opinion is to make sure you take anti-static precautions. There are a couple of threads on here about that, just search for anti-static.

For components and prices check:
http://www.ebuyer.com/
http://www.scan.co.uk/
http://www.aria.co.uk/
http://overclockers.co.uk/
http://www.komplett.co.uk/
http://www.tekheads.co.uk/
they should give you a good idea of what it will cost you. If you need advice on what parts to get there are plenty on here who'd be happy to help.

Good luck.

Post an Answer

You don't need an account to leave a response. Just enter your email address. We'll keep it private.

...OR log in with your social account

...OR comment using your social account

Thanks for your comment! Keep it up!
We just need to have a quick look and it will be live soon.
The community is happy to hear your opinion! Keep contributing!