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Anyone trekked up to Machu Picchu, any tips?

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Heading to do this in 10 days time, looking for advice Read More
kimmy2108 Avatar
4m, 1w agoPosted 4 months, 1 week ago
Heading to do this in 10 days time, looking for advice
kimmy2108 Avatar
4m, 1w agoPosted 4 months, 1 week ago
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#1
Did it in 2003. 4 days hike. If you dont have a walking pole you can buy a wooden pole hand crafted at the base and keep it as a souvenir . Its quite humid so take lots of clothes to change into as the clothes barely dry out. The altitude affects people differently, its best to acclimatise before doing the hike if possible.
Assuming you are using guides, they should have supply of Oxygen. Maybe look at diamox or similar to treat altitude sickness. Take a camera , dont rely on your phone to take photos.
Enjoy and make some great memories.
#2
rhinopaul
Did it in 2003. 4 days hike. If you dont have a walking pole you can buy a wooden pole hand crafted at the base and keep it as a souvenir . Its quite humid so take lots of clothes to change into as the clothes barely dry out. The altitude affects people differently, its best to acclimatise before doing the hike if possible.
Assuming you are using guides, they should have supply of Oxygen. Maybe look at diamox or similar to treat altitude sickness. Take a camera , dont rely on your phone to take photos.
Enjoy and make some great memories.
Thanks Paul. I am doing it as an organised charity trip and have been given loads of instructions but just looking for the inside scoop ;)
#3
I really enjoyed the hike and was really surprised how many ruins there were on the way up. Every day was different as the terrain changes between forest and bare mountain. I only recall 1 day being hard with its steep climb but every one managed. Make sure you get to the finally as early as possible because the train brings up tourists, mostly Americans in their fully equipped hiking gear making out theyve done it the hard way oO.
If your up for it as most arent by the time they get to Machu Picchu try climb Wayna Picchu, its has spectacular views down on Macchu Picchu.

The only negative I found was that even 14 years ago it was becoming ruined by modern brick building being built up the mountain to accommodate for tourists. There was even a nightclub up there, just horrible. I hope they put a stop to it.
#4
Hi,
I did the 4 day trek with Llama travel two years ago, it a bit late however preparation is key, day two is a killer as you walk to dead woman's pass, about 1300m elevation to 4214m. Walking poles are a must, I started with two, bent one and found it easier with one, you only really feel the benefit when going downhill. Wear layers, you will get hot, take some high energy snacks, good walking boots, blister plasters, toilet paper, wipes, buy a poncho locally, take water bottles we didn't use any purifcation pills as the guides supplied boiled water. Spend at least two days in Cusco acclimatising, you really do need to be ready for day two. You will be getting up at about 0300 on the last day, so don't be surprised, then you will walk to an entry point and wait.......so be prepared, the wait can be up to an hour or longer. When you get to Machu Picchu you will have to leave all of your poles etc. in the entry point, it peculiar you have to walk through with all the kit to drop it off. I took the altitude sickness pills mentioned and they made me feel even worse. The last things I would suggest is take it easy and turn around, look behind, its wonderful.
#5
I did it 5 years ago with G adventures and enjoyed it immensely. The views are fantastic and well worth the slog that is dead woman's pass. Although the fact that you meet tourists heading up to the sun gate from Machu Pichu, after their early morning arrival by bus, as your heading down is slightly annoying.
I didn't use poles but that was personal preference some people found them very useful going downhill.
Toilet paper and wipes, lots of wipes, are a very good idea the toilet facilities are rather basic, or were then.
There were some mosquitos when I went in early June, not sure about this time of year, and those things draw blood, so some repellent might help, although I'm not sure how effective it was and they were more of an annoyance than a problem.
The best advice though is to take it easy, going too fast will hurt at that altitude, go at a gentle steady pace and stop every now and then to take in the scenery. A lot of the time you'll be looking down as the Inca trail is uneven.
One of the best things I've ever done.
#6
The are a number of options, I did the one route about 5 years ago. Would love to go again. After just ten minutes I collapsed and could not go any further but our guide popped me a pill and pretty soon I was like a spring bunny but stil found walking fast up ten steps then resting while the other court up was the best tactic. We got their late in the day, the is about an hour when almost all the sightseers have gone then the is a bus back down to town. We did a full ventuer staying in the Jungle a few days fantastic stuff.

https://scontent-lht6-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/1913623_1281023866758_2384184_n.jpg?oh=b350ceb88b5957528c19506d64bf78df&oe=596AFDFB

Edited By: PulisOut on Mar 17, 2017 11:53
[Travel Expert]#7
Did it a few years ago after Everest Base Camp/Gokyo the year before. Had no issues with altitude and we found camps etc very good but then we were comparing it with Nepal! We went with a group called Llama Path.

Huayna Picchu was amazing but you'll need to have secured permits for this if you want to do it after arriving at MP after the trail. We saw a lot of people doing this that had clearly not thought this out, based on the fact they couldn't get tickets for the Inca Trail but had decided to do this. It is a big slog and you'll need to pull your own body weight up chains and ropes. Amazing view of MP at the top but probably not for the faint hearted.

The only disappointment for me, like someone has mentioned was that after being the first group in line (for what seemed like hours as we were determined to be the first in line) to get from the sun gate we were through first (we had a very active and fit group) to MP we smelt 'clean people' and those that had got the first bus/train up were also there early morning. Kind of put downer on it thinking that you would be the only ones there when people had just got the first transportation and you'd been hiking for days!

That wait like someone said can be long in the early hours of the morning. It will be cold too. I remember us all doing a yoga class waiting ....

Antibacterial gel is a must, the food your porter's cook is amazing you'll be well fed.

Peru is amazing. Jack's cafe in Cuzco is a good place for food and drink. Some of my other favourites were Colca Canyon, Arequipa, Nazca and sandboarding in Huacachina in the 'dessert'. If you can do a homestay on Lake Titicaca that is brilliant too.



Edited By: rachelandgromit on Mar 17, 2017 15:25
#8
Bear grylls always suggest keeping your feet dry so take a small bottle of talc with you (additional socks as well). :{
#9
Rhinopaul is right altitude sickness can catch anybody out regardless of fitness please take heed and make shure your insurance includes Helecopter recovery, please be safe and good luck
#10
RiverDragon8
Bear grylls always suggest keeping your feet dry so take a small bottle of talc with you (additional socks as well). :{
I bought and used SealSkinz waterproof socks, I needed them !

Edited By: dwain on Mar 18, 2017 08:20
#11
I've not been.
But from a photography point of view, I believe they charge extra for "professional" equipment over a certain length i.e. long lenses and charge for using a tripod.

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