Being charged £40 for a letter signed by my GP?! - HotUKDeals
We use cookie files to improve site functionality and personalisation. By continuing to use HotUKDeals, you accept our cookie and privacy policy.
Get the HotUKDeals app free at Google Play

Search Error

An error occurred when searching, please try again!

Login / Sign UpSubmit

Being charged £40 for a letter signed by my GP?!

£0.00 @
So I've missed about three month's worth of lectures at university due to bereavement and an illness. The bereavement period has been proven, of course with evidence of a death certificate for my uni … Read More
raks_8 Avatar
1m, 2w agoPosted 1 month, 2 weeks ago
So I've missed about three month's worth of lectures at university due to bereavement and an illness. The bereavement period has been proven, of course with evidence of a death certificate for my uni to see. However, the time of when I missed lectures due to an illness requires evidence from a doctor. I was so shocked to hear them say that I will need to pay a sum of £40 for a letter that needs to simply state my condition, how it affected my studies and a signature.

I'm willing to pay for the letter but £40 for a simple letter is just too much! Have you guys ever been charged this much? Is this the usual price?

Thanks.
raks_8 Avatar
1m, 2w agoPosted 1 month, 2 weeks ago
Options
Best Answer
Sounds reasonable to me . If during your time off Uni with illness you had seen your doctor and he felt you were too unwell to attend Uni, he would have provided you with sick notes for free. If in retrospect your Uni now needs an additional letter to clarify the illness and dates etc , then the GP has to take time out to check your case , dictate or type a letter. I would also assume the fee is in part to discourage the request of such letters , GPs seem overworked with normal appointments, so I'm guessing they don't want to add to their workload. I'm also assuming here that you did visit your doctor whilst you were ill , and he advised you to not attend Uni, and that you kept them advised all along the way of what was happening.

Edited By: tinkerbellian on Apr 09, 2017 07:15

All Responses

(20) Jump to unreadPost an answer
Responses/page:
#1
Sounds like a standard fee to me.
#2
it's a private service so the doctor can charge anything they want.
#3
Sounds OK to me.
#4
Most practices do this now to deter the **** takers who come to the office everytime they have a cold. If you had a very severe condition you could possibly make an appointment with your GP and ask them directly, some times they will just do it for free (unless this is what you've already done)
#5
My daughters doctor only charged £15 for a letter.
#6
catbeans
Most practices do this now to deter the **** takers who come to the office everytime they have a cold. If you had a very severe condition you could possibly make an appointment with your GP and ask them directly, some times they will just do it for free (unless this is what you've already done)

How are they **** takers, they are only after a letter because work or something is demanding it, its just extortion really because they know people will have to pay it or risk losing their job, benefits, educational placement etc
#7
Generalising: if the practice is classed as a data organisation, you may be able to obtain copies of all the electronic and paper records held about you by that organisation via a Subject Access Request, unless there is some exemption. An SAR for copies of electronic data has a maximum fee of £10; that raises to £50 for a medical SAR to include copies of paper records. Considering the amount of work involved in producing a copied-paper SAR, a medical data organisation may prefer to show some flexibility and charge a lower fee for alternatively raising one specific document, say a £10 discount.....
https://ico.org.uk/for-the-public/personal-information/
#8
Error440
catbeans
Most practices do this now to deter the **** takers who come to the office everytime they have a cold. If you had a very severe condition you could possibly make an appointment with your GP and ask them directly, some times they will just do it for free (unless this is what you've already done)
How are they **** takers, they are only after a letter because work or something is demanding it, its just extortion really because they know people will have to pay it or risk losing their job, benefits, educational placement etc

You have 7 days self certified then you need a letter, going to the Drs with a cold is a waste of everyone's time.
#9
Lucky you as I've paid £150 once.
#10
catbeans
Error440
catbeans
Most practices do this now to deter the **** takers who come to the office everytime they have a cold. If you had a very severe condition you could possibly make an appointment with your GP and ask them directly, some times they will just do it for free (unless this is what you've already done)
How are they **** takers, they are only after a letter because work or something is demanding it, its just extortion really because they know people will have to pay it or risk losing their job, benefits, educational placement etc
You have 7 days self certified then you need a letter, going to the Drs with a cold is a waste of everyone's time.

Irrelevant, as i already pointed out no one asks for a doctor's note unless like the OP, some organisation they are attending for education or work etc is demanding one as proof. When people turn up to the GP to ask they are generally better by then anyway as the "proof" is asked for upon returning fit and healthy.
#11
Yes £40 for a letter is cheap, and it's only one. Ask anyone who's dealt with a solicitor - they charge for every letter, and they generate as many letters as they want, just presenting a bill at the end. Often over trite details and also only dealing with one item per letter, generating a greater income (and Bill).
#12
It depends on the individual practice, I didn't get charged for one by mine.

Edited By: Canary0500 on Apr 09, 2017 18:41: typo
#13
£25 at my GP ..and I thought that was expensive!
#14
What will providing the letter do? Will your university grant you extenuating circumstances and late submission of work? Without it will you be asked to leave the course? Yes, £40 may seem a lot for a piece of paper, but without it you may have a change in direction (for better or worse)...
#15
£40 doesn't seem a lot for a professional person to investigate what is needed in the letter, get their secretary to write it and then sign it. Doctors are paid a lot of money per hour, they have back room staff to pay and surgery expenses as well, just because you get healthcare free doesn't mean we should also have to pay for your letter :(
#16
You think that producing and signing a legal document which if proven inaccurate in a court of law could lose them their job should be free?
#17
Error440
catbeans
Error440
catbeans
Most practices do this now to deter the **** takers who come to the office everytime they have a cold. If you had a very severe condition you could possibly make an appointment with your GP and ask them directly, some times they will just do it for free (unless this is what you've already done)
How are they **** takers, they are only after a letter because work or something is demanding it, its just extortion really because they know people will have to pay it or risk losing their job, benefits, educational placement etc
You have 7 days self certified then you need a letter, going to the Drs with a cold is a waste of everyone's time.
Irrelevant, as i already pointed out no one asks for a doctor's note unless like the OP, some organisation they are attending for education or work etc is demanding one as proof. When people turn up to the GP to ask they are generally better by then anyway as the "proof" is asked for upon returning fit and healthy.

We are on the same page with different conclusions.
#18
hmmm did you think you could just take three months away from uni without documentation on cause ? you could have got sick certificates from the GP at the time.

if it was a job you couldn't just phone and say errrm, I'm not too well. they would want evidence.

£40 seems reasonable to me for three months off. btw, welcome to being an adult. you aren't in school.
#19
I have to concur that £40 seems a very reasonable amount to charge for undertaking such a service as its outside what would be considered there general service. On the other hand I know that some GP's have not charged anything to do it but it all depends on the practice's procedures.
#20
Sounds reasonable to me . If during your time off Uni with illness you had seen your doctor and he felt you were too unwell to attend Uni, he would have provided you with sick notes for free. If in retrospect your Uni now needs an additional letter to clarify the illness and dates etc , then the GP has to take time out to check your case , dictate or type a letter. I would also assume the fee is in part to discourage the request of such letters , GPs seem overworked with normal appointments, so I'm guessing they don't want to add to their workload. I'm also assuming here that you did visit your doctor whilst you were ill , and he advised you to not attend Uni, and that you kept them advised all along the way of what was happening.

Edited By: tinkerbellian on Apr 09, 2017 07:15

Post an Answer

You don't need an account to leave a response. Just enter your email address. We'll keep it private.

...OR log in with your social account

...OR comment using your social account

Thanks for your comment! Keep it up!
We just need to have a quick look and it will be live soon.
The community is happy to hear your opinion! Keep contributing!