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Best value used car from the list below?

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As above, best value car from the below list would be great to know. Have around £10k to spend and would like a small hatchback. Cheers. https://postimg.org/image/alz0xedev/ https://postimg.org… Read More
paza12 Avatar
4m, 3w agoPosted 4 months, 3 weeks ago
As above, best value car from the below list would be great to know. Have around £10k to spend and would like a small hatchback. Cheers.

https://postimg.org/image/alz0xedev/

https://postimg.org/image/8cq5pimup/

https://postimg.org/image/x5ifw5lmf/
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paza12 Avatar
4m, 3w agoPosted 4 months, 3 weeks ago
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(22) Jump to unreadPost an answer
Responses/page:
#1
Best value in terms of...?
- resale value
- economy
- luxury
?
#2
bobtastic
Best value in terms of...?
- resale value
- economy
- luxury
?


All rounder really. Will be keeping it for probably around 3 years, and will use it for daily 15 minute drives to work and a monthly 2 hour trip. Ideally would like Bluetooth to play music off. Not too bothered about engine size but would like something economical, 5 doors and something like a small hatchback. Cheers.
#3
wouldn't bother spending 10k on a car bro. get a reliable kia with 3 or 4 years warranty left for about 6k then pocket the rest for a rainy day. sounds like you just want a reliable run around that gets you to point a to b. ;)
#4
Fiesta Ecoboost with leather trim.
#5
alieus_uk25
wouldn't bother spending 10k on a car bro. get a reliable kia with 3 or 4 years warranty left for about 6k then pocket the rest for a rainy day. sounds like you just want a reliable run around that gets you to point a to b. ;)


Cheers mate. There are kia's on the list, any you would recommend? suppose I would need to check if the warranty would transfer over.
#6
The deals are not great. Better deals off autotrader.
They are not cheap enough to warrant buying them and keeping them for 3 years.

Look how much a 5 year old (which the 15 reg ones will be) with the kind of mileage it will eventually have will give you an idea of what it will be worth.

So I suggest either buy something else or plan on keeping it longer to absorb the depreciation.
#7
GAVINLEWISHUKD
The deals are not great. Better deals off autotrader.
They are not cheap enough to warrant buying them and keeping them for 3 years.

Look how much a 5 year old (which the 15 reg ones will be) with the kind of mileage it will eventually have will give you an idea of what it will be worth.

So I suggest either buy something else or plan on keeping it longer to absorb the depreciation.


Cheers for the response. First time buying a car so the three year figure was just something I picked out of the air! If I extended the time I kept the car to five years, would any of the cars from the list make it viable to buy?
#8
sminky
Fiesta Ecoboost with leather trim.


That the one for £10.7k? Cheers.
#9
What daily driving will you do? 15 mins could be 12 miles down the motorway or 2 miles in rush hour traffic.
If it doesn't get a good run then diesel is not usually the best choice long term. Lots of short trips in turbo petrol cars doesn't generally do them good either.

Also look at where the cars are in realation to having major services. You may find you need to have a major service and belt change which could cost £500+ on some cars not long after buying it.
#10
paza12
GAVINLEWISHUKD
The deals are not great. Better deals off autotrader.
They are not cheap enough to warrant buying them and keeping them for 3 years.

Look how much a 5 year old (which the 15 reg ones will be) with the kind of mileage it will eventually have will give you an idea of what it will be worth.

So I suggest either buy something else or plan on keeping it longer to absorb the depreciation.


Cheers for the response. First time buying a car so the three year figure was just something I picked out of the air! If I extended the time I kept the car to five years, would any of the cars from the list make it viable to buy?


if it's ur first time buying a car I wouldn't recommend spending 10k unless ur earning a good amount. say 50k plus a year. the car ur looking for can be had for a alot less it's usually wen need specific end cars that u need spend more such as 7 seater mpv or 4×4 then u won't get a decent car for around 2k otherwise buy something like a honda civic for say 2 to 3 thousand and it will be fine for 3 years. if u want newer car a lease may he cheaper for u. at then if like some of us whom get bored of a car say after 1 or 2 years u can get another without losing too much a car that's worth around 1k/2k won't lose much value in 2 3 years vs a 10k car unless it's a rare type.
#11
GAVINLEWISHUKD
What daily driving will you do? 15 mins could be 12 miles down the motorway or 2 miles in rush hour traffic.
If it doesn't get a good run then diesel is not usually the best choice long term. Lots of short trips in turbo petrol cars doesn't generally do them good either.
Also look at where the cars are in realation to having major services. You may find you need to have a major service and belt change which could cost £500+ on some cars not long after buying it.
Petrol turbo's are fine because they don't carbon up anywhere near as much as diesel turbo's, but it is an extra thing to go wrong, they can strain engines and reduce life span. Smaller engines with turbo's are more prone for headgasket failure for example. Sometimes it's better to go for a naturally aspirated engine.
#12
Remember at 3 years old a car is getting to the point more work needs doing, brake pads, exhaust, tyres, major service (if not already done).

I bought a 3 year old car & spent more on it in 12 months than the 12 year old one in 3 years. Sometimes it's better to go older as everything that's going to break has done by then say 5 years old.

A lot of Kias now have 7 year warranty but remember that covers things that break not that wear out so if the exhaust snaps & falls off that on you not the warranty.
#13
If its your first car, I wouldn't recommend spending 10k on it. Like someone said above, get yours self a cheap run around first. That is what I did.
#14
shauneco
GAVINLEWISHUKD
What daily driving will you do? 15 mins could be 12 miles down the motorway or 2 miles in rush hour traffic.
If it doesn't get a good run then diesel is not usually the best choice long term. Lots of short trips in turbo petrol cars doesn't generally do them good either.
Also look at where the cars are in realation to having major services. You may find you need to have a major service and belt change which could cost £500+ on some cars not long after buying it.
Petrol turbo's are fine because they don't carbon up anywhere near as much as diesel turbo's, but it is an extra thing to go wrong, they can strain engines and reduce life span. Smaller engines with turbo's are more prone for headgasket failure for example. Sometimes it's better to go for a naturally aspirated engine.

My point on turbo petrol (especially smaller ones) was that forced induction on cold engines often leads to early engine and or turbo wear. Lots of short trips will likely cause more issues when keeping a car long term.

But then again cars in general can be a lottery at the best of times. :)
#15
If it's your first car and you're just wanting a runaround, I'd say get yourself a good secondhand one. We bought a 5 year old 1.4l Peugeot 207 SSW a couple of years ago for about £3k - really economical to run, reliable, cheap tax and for us on average about 40mpg. It doesn't have the luxury of Bluetooth but you can get these pretty cheaply at Halfords.

Of course if you want a bit more luxury you'd have to pay a little more, but as a first car definitely go pre owned
#16
Honda have won the most reliable car brand for the 8th year running.
#17
These prices are nothing special - like others have said --- better off looking elsewhere


Edited By: NAZ17 on Jan 29, 2017 16:41
#18
GAVINLEWISHUKD
shauneco
GAVINLEWISHUKD
What daily driving will you do? 15 mins could be 12 miles down the motorway or 2 miles in rush hour traffic.
If it doesn't get a good run then diesel is not usually the best choice long term. Lots of short trips in turbo petrol cars doesn't generally do them good either.
Also look at where the cars are in realation to having major services. You may find you need to have a major service and belt change which could cost £500+ on some cars not long after buying it.
Petrol turbo's are fine because they don't carbon up anywhere near as much as diesel turbo's, but it is an extra thing to go wrong, they can strain engines and reduce life span. Smaller engines with turbo's are more prone for headgasket failure for example. Sometimes it's better to go for a naturally aspirated engine.
My point on turbo petrol (especially smaller ones) was that forced induction on cold engines often leads to early engine and or turbo wear. Lots of short trips will likely cause more issues when keeping a car long term.
But then again cars in general can be a lottery at the best of times. :)
Good point.
#19
shauneco
GAVINLEWISHUKD
shauneco
GAVINLEWISHUKD
What daily driving will you do? 15 mins could be 12 miles down the motorway or 2 miles in rush hour traffic.
If it doesn't get a good run then diesel is not usually the best choice long term. Lots of short trips in turbo petrol cars doesn't generally do them good either.
Also look at where the cars are in realation to having major services. You may find you need to have a major service and belt change which could cost 587.06€ (£500)+ on some cars not long after buying it.
Petrol turbo's are fine because they don't carbon up anywhere near as much as diesel turbo's, but it is an extra thing to go wrong, they can strain engines and reduce life span. Smaller engines with turbo's are more prone for headgasket failure for example. Sometimes it's better to go for a naturally aspirated engine.
My point on turbo petrol (especially smaller ones) was that forced induction on cold engines often leads to early engine and or turbo wear. Lots of short trips will likely cause more issues when keeping a car long term.
But then again cars in general can be a lottery at the best of times. :)
Good point.

Useful info,thanks.

I have an 06 Honda 2.2 diesel which does not suffer from some of the maladies that modern ones do like blocked diesel particulate filters(which I have been told can only be cleared 4 times then it is a very expensive replacement).
#20
landros1
shauneco
GAVINLEWISHUKD
shauneco
GAVINLEWISHUKD
What daily driving will you do? 15 mins could be 12 miles down the motorway or 2 miles in rush hour traffic.
If it doesn't get a good run then diesel is not usually the best choice long term. Lots of short trips in turbo petrol cars doesn't generally do them good either.
Also look at where the cars are in realation to having major services. You may find you need to have a major service and belt change which could cost 587.06€ (£500)+ on some cars not long after buying it.
Petrol turbo's are fine because they don't carbon up anywhere near as much as diesel turbo's, but it is an extra thing to go wrong, they can strain engines and reduce life span. Smaller engines with turbo's are more prone for headgasket failure for example. Sometimes it's better to go for a naturally aspirated engine.
My point on turbo petrol (especially smaller ones) was that forced induction on cold engines often leads to early engine and or turbo wear. Lots of short trips will likely cause more issues when keeping a car long term.
But then again cars in general can be a lottery at the best of times. :)
Good point.
Useful info,thanks.
I have an 06 Honda 2.2 diesel which does not suffer from some of the maladies that modern ones do like blocked diesel particulate filters(which I have been told can only be cleared 4 times then it is a very expensive replacement).
I'm not sure how many times a dpf can be cleared out but it should be many more times than 4, They're supposed to be cleaned every time the car does a dpf regeneration.

If the regeneration doesn't occur often enough then it could potentially block up, When they block up it may take more than one regeneration to clear them and eventually regeneration will have little affect whatsoever resulting in the need of a costly replacement.
#21
shauneco
landros1
shauneco
GAVINLEWISHUKD
shauneco
GAVINLEWISHUKD
What daily driving will you do? 15 mins could be 12 miles down the motorway or 2 miles in rush hour traffic.
If it doesn't get a good run then diesel is not usually the best choice long term. Lots of short trips in turbo petrol cars doesn't generally do them good either.
Also look at where the cars are in realation to having major services. You may find you need to have a major service and belt change which could cost 587.06€ (587.06€ (£500))+ on some cars not long after buying it.
Petrol turbo's are fine because they don't carbon up anywhere near as much as diesel turbo's, but it is an extra thing to go wrong, they can strain engines and reduce life span. Smaller engines with turbo's are more prone for headgasket failure for example. Sometimes it's better to go for a naturally aspirated engine.
My point on turbo petrol (especially smaller ones) was that forced induction on cold engines often leads to early engine and or turbo wear. Lots of short trips will likely cause more issues when keeping a car long term.
But then again cars in general can be a lottery at the best of times. :)
Good point.
Useful info,thanks.
I have an 06 Honda 2.2 diesel which does not suffer from some of the maladies that modern ones do like blocked diesel particulate filters(which I have been told can only be cleared 4 times then it is a very expensive replacement).
I'm not sure how many times a dpf can be cleared out but it should be many more times than 4, They're supposed to be cleaned every time the car does a dpf regeneration.
If the regeneration doesn't occur often enough then it could potentially block up, When they block up it may take more than one regeneration to clear them and eventually regeneration will have little affect whatsoever resulting in the need of a costly replacement.

I do not do enough fast driving to keep a modern diesel trouble free.
I will stick with my old,reliable, economical banger.
#22
How small can the hatchback be? Hyundai i10. Best city car on the road by a country mile. My wife has one and I'm always finding excuses to nab it lol. Got it for 6 grand from a main dealer 6 months ago. 1.0 Premium on 14 plate with 17k miles and a warranty (and AA breakdown cover) that doesn't expire until 2019! Very very well put together (the doors really close with a thunk as opposed to the tinny sound on her previous car, an Aygo. The i10 is in another league altogether. Group 1insurance, 50mpg just tootling about. Oh, and can seat 5 at a push. No other car this size can.



Edited By: bellboys on Jan 30, 2017 00:43

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