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Cable for a new electric cooker

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Hello good people. Can anyone help me with this one please? If my cooker needs a 3x4mm2 does it simply means it's a12mm wire? I have been quoted 70£ for installation (20£ for wire) so I would rather t… Read More
Seb_WTF Avatar
2y, 6m agoPosted 2 years, 6 months ago
Hello good people. Can anyone help me with this one please? If my cooker needs a 3x4mm2 does it simply means it's a12mm wire? I have been quoted 70£ for installation (20£ for wire) so I would rather to have a look myself for a cheaper one. actually I'm surprised as it's quite thick cable and cooker isn't that big. Thanks

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Seb_WTF Avatar
2y, 6m agoPosted 2 years, 6 months ago
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#1
I don't believe a 4mm2 cable exsists. cooker cable is usually 6mm2 which means each cable is 6mm . you will twin and earth cable ie live, neutral and earth as opposed to just twin which is live and neutral. do you have the cooker terminal Box connected to the wall from the fuse box?
you would have to check part p regs but i believe you may be ok if it's a like for like.
#2
This sounds like the following link (not the cheapest just to give you a starting point)

http://www.diy.com/departments/prysmian-40mm-twin-earth-cable-reel-l25m/178177_BQ.prd

Bear in mind that if the twin and earth is not already ther you'll need isolation switches etc as well.

Hope this is of some help
#3
diycrazy
I don't believe a 4mm2 cable exsists. cooker cable is usually 6mm2 which means each cable is 6mm . you will twin and earth cable ie live, neutral and earth as opposed to just twin which is live and neutral. do you have the cooker terminal Box connected to the wall from the fuse box?
you would have to check part p regs but i believe you may be ok if it's a like for like.

Seeing that the OP has no clue as to what is required do you honestly believe the OP to be competent in fixing their electrical wiring?

I'm all for giving sensible advice to the right people but I think you failed in this instance.

@OP - not sure about the price and the ability/qualifications of the electrician that quoted you (they sound iffy) - just open the yellow pages - phone up qualified electricians and ask for a quote to wire a cooker to wall point and take the best offer. Any qualified electrician will know the correct cable and the time it takes (it'll be a simple job maybe 30mins)

Edited By: philphil61 on Dec 15, 2014 10:36
#4
Dont worry about it being too thick, there is never such thing as a cable that is to thick for the job, and as above 4mm2 seems an odd size, wilkos sell cooker cable by the meter.

So long as you have the cooker point installed ready its a simple and safe job so long as you remember to isolate the breaker to that point, personally I would isolate all the electrics to be safe as I never trust anyone elses wring and if its on the right circuit.

Simple 5 minute job, screwdriver and stanley knife is all thats needed toolwise and a length of earth sleeveing.

To minimise downtime on electrics wire the cooker side up first.
#5
Thanks lads, I will try with different electricians.
#6
Where did you get the 4mm2 from and what cooker is it [power rating on the plate]?
#7
It's BEKO BDVC665MK. I have been quoted 50£ from a different electrician
#8
Wilkinsons will sell the wire you can cut it to length, its a simple job, but I am not sure about legislation now with electrics, so becareful check your allowed to do it.
#9
I bought a 6mm twin & earth from. EBay for a couple of quid. Then got someone off gumtree to install it for £29

Been going strong for 2 years & 3 house moves :)
#10
Given the ratings on the Beko site for that model state maximum 32a then either a 4mm2 or 6mm2 heat resistant 3 core flexible cable i.e. Butyl rubber should suffice from the cooker to the connection plate and 4mm2 or 6mm Twin and Earth from the consumer unit to the cooker switch.





Edited By: arachnoid on Dec 15, 2014 13:55: update
#11
haritori
Wilkinsons will sell the wire you can cut it to length, its a simple job, but I am not sure about legislation now with electrics, so becareful check your allowed to do it.
If its wiring into an existing terminal point then legislation says its ok for anyone to do (from a legal standpoint), its only when it comes to such as working on a ring main or directly on a breaker box. eg; you can add a spur from an existing socket or replace a light fitting, but tapping into the ring to add a socket for example is not OK.
#12
arachnoid
Given the ratings on the Beko site for that model state maximum 32a then either a 4mm2 or 6mm2 heat resistant 3 core flexible cable i.e. Butyl rubber should suffice from the cooker to the connection plate and 4mm2 or 6mm Twin and Earth from the consumer unit to the cooker switch.

Personally if the minimum is you can buy and fit is 4mm cable then I would step that up to the next size, when it comes to wiring its always better to get an higher rated cable than you think you need.
#13
I get angry when I read about quotes for £70 to fit a cooker (a ten minute job at the most). As someone else suggested, look on Gumtree. Two guys came out and took away my old cooker and installed my new cooker for £30. It doesn't need to be a qualified electrician, just someone that knows this stuff. I connected up and disconnected cookers in the past and it's really easy however I don't have the mobility now. I'm not suggesting you do it, just to look around. The £50 quote sounds okay though, if that includes them bringing along the cable included in the price.
#14
therealslimkaty
I get angry when I read about quotes for £70 to fit a cooker (a ten minute job at the most). As someone else suggested, look on Gumtree. Two guys came out and took away my old cooker and installed my new cooker for £30. It doesn't need to be a qualified electrician, just someone that knows this stuff. I connected up and disconnected cookers in the past and it's really easy however I don't have the mobility now. I'm not suggesting you do it, just to look around. The £50 quote sounds okay though, if that includes them bringing along the cable included in the price.

The cable should only be about £5/6 maximum (thats buying by the meter even cheaper by the drum) so easy £40 for a 10 minute job, not a bad hourly rate when you work it out.

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