can an upgrade phone still get blocked by original seller? - HotUKDeals
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can an upgrade phone still get blocked by original seller?

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Hi guys thinking of buying a phone off a person on ebay . but i was wandering if i bought the phone that was an upgrade. can it still get blocked down the line? or is it best to get a phone that has r… Read More
optimus_prime2 Avatar
4m, 3w agoPosted 4 months, 3 weeks ago
Hi guys thinking of buying a phone off a person on ebay . but i was wandering if i bought the phone that was an upgrade. can it still get blocked down the line? or is it best to get a phone that has receipt. thinking of buying an iphone 7
optimus_prime2 Avatar
4m, 3w agoPosted 4 months, 3 weeks ago
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#1
They don't own phone so yeah it can still be locked or they can report it stolen after PayPal protection expires and you're screwed
#2
jimhuf
They don't own phone so yeah it can still be locked or they can report it stolen after PayPal protection expires and you're screwed
yeh i get you. so best getting a phone with receipt. that shows it was bought.
#3
They could still block it so unless it's a cheap mobile, I wouldn't.
#4
There will be a contract attached to that phone if the seller stops paying the bill then the network provider will block that phone.
#5
KEVIN6BZ
There will be a contract attached to that phone if the seller stops paying the bill then the network provider will block that phone.
yeh but if someone bought the phone like sim free. then they cant block it can they..
#6
more likely they will block the sim
#7
My mate had a iPhone on o2 and they blocked the phone . As the original owner had ran up a bill of £600 . It's not sim free though as it was obtained on a upgrade . So original owner has agreed a new contract which the new phone is part of that contract
#8
Any phone, regardless of it being a contract, pay as you go or sim free can be blocked in order to facilitate an insurance claim.
#9
KEVIN6BZ
My mate had a iPhone on o2 and they blocked the phone . As the original owner had ran up a bill of £600 . It's not sim free though as it was obtained on a upgrade . So original owner has agreed a new contract which the new phone is part of that contract
yeh kevin i get you. guess best option is to find someone who has a sim free phone for sale with receipt of purchase.
#10
adamspencer95
Any phone, regardless of it being a contract, pay as you go or sim free can be blocked in order to facilitate an insurance claim.
really.. so whats the best way of doing it then?
#11
optimus_prime2
adamspencer95
Any phone, regardless of it being a contract, pay as you go or sim free can be blocked in order to facilitate an insurance claim.
really.. so whats the best way of doing it then?


there isnt. there is always a risk. unless you have the original invoice from the shop it was bought from in your name (therefore proving ownership), someone can always file an insurance claim later on. even if they give you a receipt they could always try and say its fake
#12
adamspencer95
optimus_prime2
adamspencer95
Any phone, regardless of it being a contract, pay as you go or sim free can be blocked in order to facilitate an insurance claim.
really.. so whats the best way of doing it then?


there isnt. there is always a risk. unless you have the original invoice from the shop it was bought from in your name (therefore proving ownership), someone can always file an insurance claim later on. even if they give you a receipt they could always try and say its fake


I think the point to consider is that a contract one is more likely to get blocked - for two reasons:

Non-payment of bill

Insurance


Whilst a SIM free phone can get added to insurance, it's far more commonly added to contract phones as part of people's upgrades or new contracts - believe it or not, a lot of people don't really think about what they're signing up for, and there's always the temptation among unscrupulous people to 'double their money' by getting another phone to sell once they realise how easy it is to make a claim.

Those who can afford SIM free phones arguably wouldn't be so driven to commit such as scam as they will tend to have more disposable income and less motivation to try and make a fast buck.
#13
Just stick to buying from people with very high positive feedback, including selling previous phones.
#14
If you buy it off eBay when you receive it try to get it unlocked ASAP then it doesn't belong to any network
#15
omar020
If you buy it off eBay when you receive it try to get it unlocked ASAP then it doesn't belong to any network

Will still be a brick if reported stolen unlocked or not
#16
If you do buy take precautions. Ask lots of questions. Do a checkmend of the imei to make sure it's not blocked. Also screenshot everything the person says for future reference. I was also in this situation not long ago after buying a used s7. The guy reported it lost/stolen. eBay had my back. They do make you provide a Checkmend report though. Good luck of you buy it and hope it doesn't happen to you. :)
#17
mattmerch
omar020
If you buy it off eBay when you receive it try to get it unlocked ASAP then it doesn't belong to any network

Will still be a brick if reported stolen unlocked or not


Yes pretty much useless. You can still use the phone just not on a carrier network.
#18
misterleoni
adamspencer95
optimus_prime2
adamspencer95
Any phone, regardless of it being a contract, pay as you go or sim free can be blocked in order to facilitate an insurance claim.
really.. so whats the best way of doing it then?


there isnt. there is always a risk. unless you have the original invoice from the shop it was bought from in your name (therefore proving ownership), someone can always file an insurance claim later on. even if they give you a receipt they could always try and say its fake


I think the point to consider is that a contract one is more likely to get blocked - for two reasons:

Non-payment of bill

Insurance


Whilst a SIM free phone can get added to insurance, it's far more commonly added to contract phones as part of people's upgrades or new contracts - believe it or not, a lot of people don't really think about what they're signing up for, and there's always the temptation among unscrupulous people to 'double their money' by getting another phone to sell once they realise how easy it is to make a claim.

Those who can afford SIM free phones arguably wouldn't be so driven to commit such as scam as they will tend to have more disposable income and less motivation to try and make a fast buck.


Whilst I agree, I still maintain that it doesn't matter whether the phone is 'contract' or not, there is still a fairly high risk of it being blocked.

I'm also not sure how many people would deliberately ruin their credit score and run the risk of debt collectors to potentially make a few hundred off a phone sale, but that might just be me.
#19
About 5 years ago. I had bought from online and it got blocked. I had adresses and phone numbers of the seller.
Called the police

And they was useless. Couldn't help me at all.
#20
anselmofa
mattmerch
omar020
If you buy it off eBay when you receive it try to get it unlocked ASAP then it doesn't belong to any network
Will still be a brick if reported stolen unlocked or not
Yes pretty much useless. You can still use the phone just not on a carrier network.


Will be unable to use it on any U.K. Network at all
#21
Rich069
Just stick to buying from people with very high positive feedback, including selling previous phones.


You don't know where *they* got the phone from though. Unless they personally buy all their phones from new.
#22
omar020
If you buy it off eBay when you receive it try to get it unlocked ASAP then it doesn't belong to any network


That's completely untrue. Doesn't make any difference.
#23
adamspencer95
misterleoni
adamspencer95
optimus_prime2
adamspencer95
Any phone, regardless of it being a contract, pay as you go or sim free can be blocked in order to facilitate an insurance claim.
really.. so whats the best way of doing it then?


there isnt. there is always a risk. unless you have the original invoice from the shop it was bought from in your name (therefore proving ownership), someone can always file an insurance claim later on. even if they give you a receipt they could always try and say its fake


I think the point to consider is that a contract one is more likely to get blocked - for two reasons:

Non-payment of bill

Insurance


Whilst a SIM free phone can get added to insurance, it's far more commonly added to contract phones as part of people's upgrades or new contracts - believe it or not, a lot of people don't really think about what they're signing up for, and there's always the temptation among unscrupulous people to 'double their money' by getting another phone to sell once they realise how easy it is to make a claim.

Those who can afford SIM free phones arguably wouldn't be so driven to commit such as scam as they will tend to have more disposable income and less motivation to try and make a fast buck.


Whilst I agree, I still maintain that it doesn't matter whether the phone is 'contract' or not, there is still a fairly high risk of it being blocked.

I'm also not sure how many people would deliberately ruin their credit score and run the risk of debt collectors to potentially make a few hundred off a phone sale, but that might just be me.


I think there are more people who recklessly take out phone contracts they can't afford because they want the phone *now*.

'SIM free' entails someone physically buying the phone with their own money, which implies they have the cash and can afford it. On that basis I believe that you are vastly more likely to get a blocked phone that's from a contract than that someone bought in, say, an Apple Store.
Not *impossible* either way but if we are talking about motivating factors then I feel that there are more thoughtless morons (who don't care about bad credit ratings) taking out overpriced phone contracts than there are thoughtless morons walking into a shop to buy a £600 phone outright with the ready cash.

Edited By: misterleoni on Jan 01, 2017 14:15: Error
#24
optimus_prime2
About 5 years ago. I had bought from online and it got blocked. I had adresses and phone numbers of the seller.
Called the police
And they was useless. Couldn't help me at all.

So you want to risk it again? Would stick to retailers, plenty sell refurbs

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