Can anyone link me to a website to learn all about building a Gaming computer? Also is their any laptops with SSD and HDD if so where may I find them to purchase? - HotUKDeals
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Can anyone link me to a website to learn all about building a Gaming computer? Also is their any laptops with SSD and HDD if so where may I find them to purchase?

WitnessGoals Avatar
2y, 4m agoPosted 2 years, 4 months ago
Looking for all the information I need to learn to look at purchasing the stuff to build a gaming computer, My father knows what he is doing but is busy at the moment and as I wish to gather a rough idea of how much I will be spending I want to try and get a start on looking at the parts to purchase, I also want a fast laptop with a big harddrive space, so it possible to get a laptop with a SSD and HDD?
WitnessGoals Avatar
2y, 4m agoPosted 2 years, 4 months ago
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#1
If you're planning on building a computer then use PCPartPicker, it shows you step by step what you need and sorts out the parts in rating so you don't end up getting a **** part that doesn't work very well. I also suggest looking up 'Carey Holzmen' on YouTube as his videos helped me build my first gaming PC.
#2
First off work out do you want a desktop or a laptop. If you want gaming then I'd go desktop as you can keep them relevant for many years. A laptop stops being good after only a couple of years and then you have to buy an entirely new one.

With that out the way, yes you can get laptops with both SSD and hard disk. Usually on 17inch or greater machines. You can also get ones with 2 drive bays and a slot for an mSata SSD (so 3 hard disks) or even ones with swappable DVD drives (up to 4 hard disks).

As suggested. Part picker is a great resource and the rating is helpful but also means some very good sleeper items that no one has reviewed can easily be missed. Any part you plan to buy be sure to google for reviews to know about any known issues or positives that might make the final decision easier. Be sure to set part picker to compatibility so that everything will work together.

Budget wise at the lower end of the market for playing most games at 720p on high settings

Laptop £650
Desktop £400-450 - excluding screen, keyboard and mouse

Midrange wise you're talking about paying to play at 1080 on high settings for most games;

Laptop £1000
Desktop £650-700

Also add to that the laptop will have compromises so the graphics will not be as strong and you might have to accept a lower res screen. For this reason I'd recommend going for a desktop. For £500 you can get a machine that can play just about anything you throw at it pushing the detail to the bleeding edge while letting you upgrade when needed to keep it current. Just as a comparison why it's so much better to go for a desktop if you have the choice.

£500 Desktop vs £750 Laptop as a timeline
Year 0 - Desktop already out performs the laptop at max settings but not by a huge margin
Year 1 - Upgrade the monitor on the desktop for £150 for something better
Year 2 - Update the graphics card to keep everything current £100 after selling the old one and the desktop out performs the laptop massively
Year 3 - Buy new laptop £750
Year 4 - Time for a new desktop processor £150
Year 5 - Update the RAM and add a new case as the rest of the system is still more than powerful enough.

Obviously exaggerated, but you can see what I'm getting at about the laptop in that you will need to replace it every 3 or so years just to keep up with the latest games. £1500 on laptops is not a small sum, where as the £500 desktop might only have cost £1000 and remained relevant every year you own it. Obviously what you upgrade can be dictated by you as you go along and if you find something is not up to standards you can swap it out to keep your gaming smooth. Final point I'll add here is that you can easily take a cheap £500 PC now and turn it into something a lot more powerful over a few years so you are not stuck at the same price point for years, you can add improved performance depending on your needs and budget so if you want to go to 110% as you're a bit tight this year it's easy to do, if you feel a bit more eager to spend then you can also go 150%.

If you really want something portable then I'd go out and get your desktop with £100 off the budget you set and then buy an old 1st gen core i laptop second hand as you can get some machines with great battery life.

Last thing, feel free to post up again in ask with a final configuration you have set out and I'm sure people will chime in with suggestions of what might offer better value or performance.


Edited By: Astec123 on Jul 15, 2014 00:06
#3
Astec123
First off work out do you want a desktop or a laptop. If you want gaming then I'd go desktop as you can keep them relevant for many years. A laptop stops being good after only a couple of years and then you have to buy an entirely new one.

With that out the way, yes you can get laptops with both SSD and hard disk. Usually on 17inch or greater machines. You can also get ones with 2 drive bays and a slot for an mSata SSD (so 3 hard disks) or even ones with swappable DVD drives (up to 4 hard disks).



As suggested. Part picker is a great resource and the rating is helpful but also means some very good sleeper items that no one has reviewed can easily be missed. Any part you plan to buy be sure to google for reviews to know about any known issues or positives that might make the final decision easier. Be sure to set part picker to compatibility so that everything will work together.

Budget wise at the lower end of the market for playing most games at 720p on high settings

Laptop £650
Desktop £400-450 - excluding screen, keyboard and mouse

Midrange wise you're talking about paying to play at 1080 on high settings for most games;

Laptop £1000
Desktop £650-700

Also add to that the laptop will have compromises so the graphics will not be as strong and you might have to accept a lower res screen. For this reason I'd recommend going for a desktop. For £500 you can get a machine that can play just about anything you throw at it pushing the detail to the bleeding edge while letting you upgrade when needed to keep it current. Just as a comparison why it's so much better to go for a desktop if you have the choice.

£500 Desktop vs £750 Laptop as a timeline
Year 0 - Desktop already out performs the laptop at max settings but not by a huge margin
Year 1 - Upgrade the monitor on the desktop for £150 for something better
Year 2 - Update the graphics card to keep everything current £100 after selling the old one and the desktop out performs the laptop massively
Year 3 - Buy new laptop £750
Year 4 - Time for a new desktop processor £150
Year 5 - Update the RAM and add a new case as the rest of the system is still more than powerful enough.

Obviously exaggerated, but you can see what I'm getting at about the laptop in that you will need to replace it every 3 or so years just to keep up with the latest games. £1500 on laptops is not a small sum, where as the £500 desktop might only have cost £1000 and remained relevant every year you own it. Obviously what you upgrade can be dictated by you as you go along and if you find something is not up to standards you can swap it out to keep your gaming smooth.

If you really want something portable then I'd go out and get your desktop with £100 off the budget you set and then buy an old 1st gen core i laptop second hand as you can get some machines with great battery life.



Thanks was very helpful, I was just looking for a laptop for storage / browsing / music and any kind of photo editing if i ever decide to do that kind of thing, whilst the desktop was going and always purely be for gaming purposes. Ill give the site a go, and thanks very very much for the helpful input... One question though, what sort of sites will i be able to find laptops build with SSD and HDD's together? Thanks.
#4
WitnessGoals
Astec123
First off work out do you want a desktop or a laptop. If you want gaming then I'd go desktop as you can keep them relevant for many years. A laptop stops being good after only a couple of years and then you have to buy an entirely new one.

With that out the way, yes you can get laptops with both SSD and hard disk. Usually on 17inch or greater machines. You can also get ones with 2 drive bays and a slot for an mSata SSD (so 3 hard disks) or even ones with swappable DVD drives (up to 4 hard disks).



As suggested. Part picker is a great resource and the rating is helpful but also means some very good sleeper items that no one has reviewed can easily be missed. Any part you plan to buy be sure to google for reviews to know about any known issues or positives that might make the final decision easier. Be sure to set part picker to compatibility so that everything will work together.

Budget wise at the lower end of the market for playing most games at 720p on high settings

Laptop £650
Desktop £400-450 - excluding screen, keyboard and mouse

Midrange wise you're talking about paying to play at 1080 on high settings for most games;

Laptop £1000
Desktop £650-700

Also add to that the laptop will have compromises so the graphics will not be as strong and you might have to accept a lower res screen. For this reason I'd recommend going for a desktop. For £500 you can get a machine that can play just about anything you throw at it pushing the detail to the bleeding edge while letting you upgrade when needed to keep it current. Just as a comparison why it's so much better to go for a desktop if you have the choice.

£500 Desktop vs £750 Laptop as a timeline
Year 0 - Desktop already out performs the laptop at max settings but not by a huge margin
Year 1 - Upgrade the monitor on the desktop for £150 for something better
Year 2 - Update the graphics card to keep everything current £100 after selling the old one and the desktop out performs the laptop massively
Year 3 - Buy new laptop £750
Year 4 - Time for a new desktop processor £150
Year 5 - Update the RAM and add a new case as the rest of the system is still more than powerful enough.

Obviously exaggerated, but you can see what I'm getting at about the laptop in that you will need to replace it every 3 or so years just to keep up with the latest games. £1500 on laptops is not a small sum, where as the £500 desktop might only have cost £1000 and remained relevant every year you own it. Obviously what you upgrade can be dictated by you as you go along and if you find something is not up to standards you can swap it out to keep your gaming smooth.

If you really want something portable then I'd go out and get your desktop with £100 off the budget you set and then buy an old 1st gen core i laptop second hand as you can get some machines with great battery life.

Thanks was very helpful, I was just looking for a laptop for storage / browsing / music and any kind of photo editing if i ever decide to do that kind of thing, whilst the desktop was going and always purely be for gaming purposes. Ill give the site a go, and thanks very very much for the helpful input... One question though, what sort of sites will i be able to find laptops build with SSD and HDD's together? Thanks.

It's a case of reading if they have 2 drive bays, if it's not advertised check the manufacturers spec sheets, google the model number is the quickest way to find out. It's not a major feature for most people but many 17inch machines will have them. If you are looking for a laptop just for browsing then why not consider something a bit smaller like 13 or 14inches. You can get good refurb first gen core i processor powered machines for little money so will manage a bit of photoshop when needed, however even a good c2duo powered machine for around £100 will do PS work to a reasonable level.

It sounds like you're catering for a what if situation and that a basic laptop will suit you better for a bit of sofa web surfing keeping your desktop ready for when it's needed. Do you really think you will need to do any serious PS stuff when your desktop is not available? It's a question worth asking yourself.
#6
I know the Dell 17R SE and probably it's successors have two drive bays. The 17R SE actually has space for two laptop drives and one slot for a msata ssd to speed up one of the drives

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