Can anyone recommend a pc/laptop between £500-£700 with a nice exterior or printer deals - HotUKDeals
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Can anyone recommend a pc/laptop between £500-£700 with a nice exterior or printer deals

realfriendlyman Avatar
5y, 7m agoPosted 5 years, 7 months ago
Hi everyone,

I really need a computer or laptop within £500-£700 but can stretch a bit more if it's very high quality and I want the pc/laptop to look attractive.

The computer is never moved around, so it doesn't matter if it's a laptop or pc but I do need a powerful computer and a decent-good sound card and spearkers, as a lot of films will be watched on it, so a good quality as well would be nice.

It's never used for gaming, so that side doesn't matter.

If any printer deals are around as well for around £100 with cheaper printer cartridges.

Thank you for any help or advice. :)
realfriendlyman Avatar
5y, 7m agoPosted 5 years, 7 months ago
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#1
whatsThePoint
Powerful computer to do what?


Nothing in particular but just want it to be future proof, so I need to get the best deal for the money. :)
#2
In that case why not build one yourself?

Buy a nice case, Powerful PSU, A motherboard that supports the latest spec'd component's and upgrade at your leisure.
#3
shauneco
In that case why not build one yourself?

Buy a nice case, Powerful PSU, A motherboard that supports the latest spec'd component's and upgrade at your leisure.


OMG, Shaun, you're still here, how you been mate, do you remember me? :)

I can't build computers and don't have the time to do it anyway, so just looking something ready made and attractive. :)
#4
whatsThePoint
realfriendlyman
whatsThePoint
Powerful computer to do what?


Nothing in particular but just want it to be future proof, so I need to get the best deal for the money. :)


a fast processor won't make it future proof
If you get an i7 it will be fast as doing things you never do, but will be no faster than an i5 at doing what you need


Ok, it's mainly for web browsing but I just need it to be future proofed as much as possible too, so any prices found would be appreciated :)
#6
realfriendlyman
shauneco
In that case why not build one yourself?

Buy a nice case, Powerful PSU, A motherboard that supports the latest spec'd component's and upgrade at your leisure.


OMG, Shaun, you're still here, how you been mate, do you remember me? :)

I can't build computers and don't have the time to do it anyway, so just looking something ready made and attractive. :)


Hi mate, yes still here lol, I'm good thanks, Hope your good too.
#7


Hi mate,

Yeah, I've seen that one but from what I can see, you can't add a sound card, right?

It will be used to watch films on as well. :)
#8
Laptop-wise, I'd highly recommend a HP Pavilion. I've got a HP Pavilion DV7 3111EA, which I got new at Christmas for around £500 (and my last laptop was a Pavilion DV9000 and was also great, until I wanted to get something faster). They seem to have great specs for their prices - mine has an Intel i7 720QM CPU, which is a quad-core processor, ostensibly clocked at 1.6ghz but automatically overclocks itself as required up to 2.8ghz. So if you're just browsing the net, it idles along, saving power and keeping the computer cool, but if you start a game it will speed up to match. It's also got 4gb RAM, a 500gb 7200rpm SATA2 hard drive, nvidia GT230M graphics with 1gb dedicated RAM and a 17" LED screen. I've been playing Crysis 2 on it smoothly.

For a desktop... I don't know. I always build them myself so I'd say just set yourself a budget and get the best parts you can for that price and put it all together, so if you can't/don't build them yourself I wouldn't know where to start...
#9
realfriendlyman

Hi mate,

Yeah, I've seen that one but from what I can see, you can't add a sound card, right?

It will be used to watch films on as well. :)

Creative PCI Express Sound Blaster X-Fi XtremeAudio [add £50.00]

http://supportapj.dell.com/support/edocs/systems/vos460/en/sm/index.html

check to see if it has built in sound if not they want £50 to fit the above or see if you can buy it cheaper




Edited By: dontasciime on Apr 25, 2011 15:48
#10
whatsThePoint
LOL did you even bother to read the limited amount of details listed by op
they don't want it to play games and i'd give hp a miss as they are near the bottom of the reliability charts
LOL yes of course I read it. They said 'I do need a powerful computer'. Gaming is one of the most demanding things a computer can be used for, so if a computer has the spec to play the latest games, it's powerful. I used gaming as an example because the OP didn't say exactly what they needed the power for. One of the other most demanding things a computer can be used for is video editing, so I could have used that as an example instead - I have Adobe Premiere Pro, After Effects and Photoshop CS5 (among others) installed for work and they all run smoothly. Adobe's Mercury Engine takes advantage of nvidia's CUDA-enabled graphics cards, which this laptop has, meaning the GPU's processor can be used alongside the CPU for certain tasks such as video rendering. Can't ask for more, power-wise, from a laptop.

What I forgot to mention, as the OP said they wanted 'a decent-good sound card and spearkers' [sic], is that the DV7 has really good speakers too. I thought the sound quality on my DV9000 was good, but on the DV7 it's even better. It's got a subwoofer on the bottom, which I was skeptical about at first as having a tiny sub on the bottom of a laptop seemed like a lame idea to me, but it does add the right amount of extra depth to the sound. I use this laptop at work and we all play music on our computers and mine is the only laptop that doesn't sound embarassingly tinny (the others are a Macbook, Acer, Samsung and a Sony). But for movie watching on a laptop, if you're really concerned about audio, I'd recommend either a decent pair of headphones or an external set of speakers, depending on where you're going to be watching them.

The OP also said 'a lot of films will be watched on it', well the DV7 has an LED screen and it's absolutely gorgeous. Evenly lit, will go as bright as you need it, colours are excellent.

The HP laptops also look great. I've got one of the older DV7s - black with the swirly pattern, which I personally prefer, but the newer DV7s are aluminium and look a bit like MacBooks, which some people may prefer.

So yeah, I read the post. The OP asked for recommendations. If they wanted an objective overview they could go to a tech website and look at aggregate scores of a range of laptops. But they came on here and asked for recommendations, so it's a little more subjective. I've got a HP DV7 and I'd recommend it, so I did. It fills all the criteria the OP asked for - it's powerful, looks nice and is in their price range.

I don't know about reliability, but I had my previous HP laptop for 3 years and it was still going strong when I sold it. Any new laptop will have a 12 month warranty on it and you can extend that if you want. The inherent problem with laptops is you've lot a lot of heat-generating electrical components in a confined space with relatively ineffective cooling systems, so they're generally unreliable and don't last very long as it, and the more powerful they are, the more heat they generate, so the shorter their lifespan. You just need to keep them well-ventilated and dust free. I haven't heard about HP being more or less reliable than others, I'm just talking about my experience with them, which has been great. If this one dies on me, I'll change my tune.


Edited By: reddragon105 on Apr 25, 2011 18:29
#11
dontasciime
realfriendlyman


Hi mate,

Yeah, I've seen that one but from what I can see, you can't add a sound card, right?

It will be used to watch films on as well. :)


Creative PCI Express Sound Blaster X-Fi XtremeAudio [add £50.00]

http://supportapj.dell.com/support/edocs/systems/vos460/en/sm/index.html

check to see if it has built in sound if not they want £50 to fit the above or see if you can buy it cheaper





I couldn't see it, as the link seems to give weird results.
#12
Can anyone recommend a stable computer, as I don't want something that may have a high fault rate but it does need to look attractive and be efficient, while remaining good value? :)
#13
That looks like good research, to be honest. But like I said - I had a HP laptop for 3 years, didn't have a single problem with it, although I do have a friend with a similar model where the graphics chip has developed a fault, which is apparently a common issue with the DV9000 series. Haven't had a single issue with my DV7 yet. Again, the OP asked for a recommendation, which is a subjective thing, and this is my personal recommendation.

whatsThePoint

Not every hp laptop is going to fail just as not every laptop of the most reliable brand is going to be trouble free, you need to look at it as an average and that average says a hp laptop is more likely to fail than say for example a Sony one, umm plus about every other brand as well lol
That said, that survey was 18 months ago now and HP have moved on at least one series since then, so who knows? The latest Sony laptops could be less reliable than the latest HP ones.

whatsThePoint

Its the way the heat is disposed off that matters not how much is produced plus new chips run not much hotter if at all than slower older chips
Totally agree with that - I didn't say anything about the amount of heat, what I said was that laptop cooling systems are relatively ineffective. Which they are. They tend to have one, tiny heatsink spread across the CPU and GPU and cooled by a 5cm fan. In a desktop you'll always have a separate heatsink for the CPU and GPU, with some CPU heatsinks being the size of a fist, plus 8-12cm fans. So you can have more powerful components in a desktop, generating more heat than slower components in a laptop of course, but overall running cooler because the heat is being much more effectively dissipated. That's one of the main advantages of a desktop computer and one of the main reasons that laptops don't last very long. The CPU in my laptop (i7 720QM) changes its speed depending on what you're doing, so if you're just browsing the net it runs at 1.6ghz and the laptop is stone cold. Start doing something more demanding, like gaming or video editing, and it will speed up as far as 2.8ghz which obviously generates a bit more heat. That's a really good feature - if you don't like HP, fine, you can get that CPU in other laptops.

whatsThePoint

also while some games do poorly make use of 4 cores not much else does and its wasted on a home pc in this case, the op will never benefit from the extra cost of having an i7
[/quote]I didn't notice any extra cost. My choice was between this laptop with the 1.6-2.8ghz i7 and another one that had a 2.2ghz i5 for the same price. I went for the one with the fancy overclocking feature and it worked out well for me.

whatsThePoint

You recommended one to suit your gaming needs, not the op needs which are different

Actually, I recommended one to suit my video editing needs. While I am a gamer, I play games at home on my desktop, which is obviously much more powerful than my laptop, with a much larger screen and much better speakers. But I need a laptop for work - obviously I'm better off editing on my desktop as it's still the better computer, but I'm often required to use production software on location to calibrate video cameras and do video editing on location or at a client's workplace, so I need a portable computer that will allow me to do that. The i7 CPU, 4gb RAM, 7200rpm hard drive and CUDA-enabled graphics card with dedicated RAM are ideal for video editing.

Again, the OP said he needed a powerful computer and I gave my spec then, as an example, said that it could play Crysis 2 smoothly because I thought people would be more likely to understand that that means it's powerful than sayingknow what that is, rather than saying 'Adobe Dynamic Link functions smoothly on this laptop'.

This is rather a moot point because the OP hasn't actually stated what they actually need the power for. They need to ask themselves how much power they actually need - if it's not for gaming, then what is it for? The bottom line is, a powerful computer is a powerful computer, regardless of your needs - a computer suitable for gaming is also a computer suitable for video editing and will also be a computer suitable for 3D modelling. I built my desktop to suit my video editing needs, the fact that it can play the latest games smoothly is just incidental.

So come, OP - why exactly does it need to be powerful? What are you going to use it for? All you've mentioned so far is watching movies, which doesn't require a very high spec at all.
#14
your better of spending the money and building your own Desktop and for that amount you'd get a really top spec machine with 6-8g RAM, 1tb HD, DVD Writer, and one of the best M/Board and Processor going, add a case and your away. 21" + TFT is around £120-£150.
#15
Disco
your better of spending the money and building your own Desktop and for that amount you'd get a really top spec machine with 6-8g RAM, 1tb HD, DVD Writer, and one of the best M/Board and Processor going, add a case and your away. 21" + TFT is around £120-£150.


I don't know how to build my own desktop though, so any suggestions on how to do this or a ready made computer would be really appreciated. :)

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