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Can someone explain 4K tv terminology please

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Hi all Sorry if this is newbish, but I'm out of the loop when it comes to TVs past 1080p. I know 4K is a higher resolution than 1080p, but what is the relevance of the following terms: HDR 8… Read More
bbfb123 Avatar
1w, 11h agoPosted 1 week, 11 hours ago
Hi all

Sorry if this is newbish, but I'm out of the loop when it comes to TVs past 1080p.

I know 4K is a higher resolution than 1080p, but what is the relevance of the following terms:

HDR
8 bit
10 bit
OLED

We currently have a Samsung hdtv that is skipping on the audio video sync and I'm looking at Sky Q but probably not till Christmas. I'd just like to be in the know to keep an eye out for a bargain. I also have an Xbox One S that I'd like to pair with a 4K tv too (any recommendations?).

I see some 50" tvs that cost like £350 and then some that cost 3 times that. What's the difference?

Many thanks
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bbfb123 Avatar
1w, 11h agoPosted 1 week, 11 hours ago
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#1
I'll fill in some,

HDR - i think it's High Dynamic Range - i think it vastly improves colour, brightness contrast

OLED - Organic light emitting diode. it's a different screen technology than traditional lcd led TV's. on oled TV's each pixel is its own backlight, meaning that for blacks it just shuts the pixel off, creating 'true blacks'. makes amazing contrasts and they tend to have more vibrant colours, but tends to be very very expensive.
#2
As comment above, but the 8/10 bit refers to the amount of colours the display is capable of, most of the cheaper 4K TVs are 8 bit HDR, however 10 bit HDR can display much greater amount of colours mainly with the very bright whites and dark blacks.
#3
go for branded tv like Samsung, LG , Sony & Panasonic
#4
But then what's this when people advertise a cheap 4k tv with HDR and someone comes in and says it's not proper HDR or something?

Is 10 bit really necessary or is 8 bit good enough?
#5
Some LG sets with IPS panels use RGBW layout - these are not real 4k and avoid like the plague.

HDR makes far more of a difference to viewing that 4k does, especially if going from a decent 1080p set.

What's your budget? No point recommending 10bit HDR premium sets of you have a £600 budget.
#6
jaydeeuk1
Some LG sets with IPS panels use RGBW layout - these are not real 4k and avoid like the plague.

HDR makes far more of a difference to viewing that 4k does, especially if going from a decent 1080p set.

What's your budget? No point recommending 10bit HDR premium sets of you have a £600 budget.


Depends really but I would probably be under that amount yeah. Will there be 50/55" 10 bit sets anytime soon? Or do I just need a 8bit HDR set?
#7
Don't bother paying a premium for HDR, or even 4k really. neither make too much of a difference and not worth it in my opinion. get an OLED from a decent brand and has good reviews
#8
bbfb123
jaydeeuk1
Some LG sets with IPS panels use RGBW layout - these are not real 4k and avoid like the plague.

HDR makes far more of a difference to viewing that 4k does, especially if going from a decent 1080p set.

What's your budget? No point recommending 10bit HDR premium sets of you have a £600 budget.


Depends really but I would probably be under that amount yeah. Will there be 50/55" 10 bit sets anytime soon? Or do I just need a 8bit HDR set?


At 4K it really depends on your eyes. Viewing distance and room lighting is going to make a big difference as well with HDR. A large percentage of people will not be able to see the difference between 8 & 10bit. Size is important as you will be able to view greater detail from further away. Have a look around your local TV show rooms and see if there's a night a day difference between the sets, don't pay out for features you won't get the best return from.

Remember bias lighting makes a big difference with TVs as well so a couple of table lamps will improve a TVs image quality in low light situations.
#9
we will be sat 15ft from the tv
#10
I purchased the Samsung KS7000 and it really is stunning as long as you have the content to play on it. A massive difference to picture quality over my old set. I paid £839 for the 55" but as you haven't mentioned size or budget it's hard to know what to recommend.
#11
I'd say we would be looking at 55-60" and budget under 750. I'm prepared to wait though before upgrading not in a rush since we don't have sky q yet. Probably won't have it till near christmad
#12
bbfb123
we will be sat 15ft from the tv
http://uk.rtings.com/tv/reviews/by-size/size-to-distance-relationship
That's too far for 4K at that distance, even 720p is going to be pushing it at 15ft. Optimal viewing distance using [email protected]" is a third of that, 5ft.
#13
OLED is a display technology like LCD, CRT or Plasma. It's not connected to any of the other terms and there have been standard Full HD OLEDs without HDR like LG's EG910.

OLED uses miniature LEDs for the subpixels and offers a lot of the benefits of plasma with less of the downsides (reasonable power consumption, much less image burn).

OLEDs are currently expensive (£1k+) and only available in larger sizes (55", 65" and 77"). Until this year they were also exclusive to LG but Philips, Sony and Panasonic have all bought OLED panels to make flagship OLED TVs.


HDR is a combination and new standards and new technologies but the core feature seems to be the ability to show a wider brightness range on screen at once, so light sources and highlights can be as bright as they are in reality. I found this to be a good overview of what the technology is and isn't:
http://www.lightillusion.com/uhdtv.html

For LCDs the key bit of hardware needed to achieve this is a backlight that can be dimmed in sections. Normally the backlight brightness is constant across the screen and different brightnesses are achieved by the LCD panel blocking more or less light (which is it's main job). This style of backlighting is generally called local dimming. Generally high end TVs have hundreds of zones so they can brighten even relatively small patches on screen (like the headlights of a car) whereas mid-range TVs make do with a few zones to brighten large areas like the sky or explosions.

However, a lot of cheaper TVs without local dimming advertise HDR as they include many of the supporting technologies. Many of these are perfectly good TVs on their own terms, but don't judge HDR based on what they output in HDR mode as I suspect Zipt has done

If you want an HDR demo then you really need to see it on a high end TV right now, such as a Sony ZD9. Likewise if your primarily reason for buying a new TV is HDR after you saw a demo then most of your options cost four figures.

HDR looks like it'll be a good technology once the price comes down, but at 55" then it shouldn't be a big factor in your decision.


8-bit and 10-bit is the number of shades each colour in a pixel can take. Namely 2^8 = 256 or 2^10 = 1024. Some, possibly most, HDR content is likely to be encoded in 10-bit colour for a couple of reasons so it's important that a TV accepts a 10-bit signal in addition to the normal 8-bit.

As far as I'm aware all TVs that even advertise HDR accept 10-bit signals. It may have been an issue a couple of years ago with the first HDR TVs but it's a non-issue these days.

Some people are worried about whether the TV creates it's output using 8-bit or 10-bit subpixels. I've never come across anyone who can give a sensible reason for this given that there's very little difference between them for typical sizes and uses. I suspect it's a misinterpretation that's grown out of the requirement above.

Generally if you want to know how good a TV is for HDR then the big factors right now are how good the backlight control is and how well it handles clipping/rolloff. The bit depth of the LCD matrix is the next thing to meaningless.
#14
delusion
I purchased the Samsung KS7000 and it really is stunning as long as you have the content to play on it. A massive difference to picture quality over my old set. I paid £839 for the 55" but as you haven't mentioned size or budget it's hard to know what to recommend.
What content are you running through it and via what source? I have the same TV and must say I am slightly underwhelmed.
#15
ipswich78
delusion
I purchased the Samsung KS7000 and it really is stunning as long as you have the content to play on it. A massive difference to picture quality over my old set. I paid £839 for the 55" but as you haven't mentioned size or budget it's hard to know what to recommend.
What content are you running through it and via what source? I have the same TV and must say I am slightly underwhelmed.

Direct play content (files stored on a nas for example - video and photos from dslr camera etc), a good test if you don't have content is finding some hdr YouTube channels as it should/does look great.

I did standard calibration based on settings I found on av forums.
#16
zipt
Don't bother paying a premium for HDR, or even 4k really. neither make too much of a difference and not worth it in my opinion. get an OLED from a decent brand and has good reviews
Diagree. 4k might not make much of a difference if sat 12 foot from a 40" screen, but decent HDR from amazon or netflix on a bright 10 bit screen will look noticable from any distance.

If you're just streaming crap from kodi in 720p then no, it will probably look worse on your £1500 4k TV compared to an old 1080p plasma.
#17
pop onto Panasonic's eBay refurb site for some rather good deals...stock changes happen a bit but some cracking bargains to be had :0).....15ft is quite far....nice big one would be your best bet.....nothing less then 55 inches. Oled will be beyond your stated budget....I'm in the market too, but waiting for this year's black Friday to rear it's monstrous bargain like head...I miss 3d.....
#18
sxxychocolate
pop onto Panasonic's eBay refurb site for some rather good deals...stock changes happen a bit but some cracking bargains to be had :0).....15ft is quite far....nice big one would be your best bet.....nothing less then 55 inches. Oled will be beyond your stated budget....I'm in the market too, but waiting for this year's black Friday to rear it's monstrous bargain like head...I miss 3d.....


Yeah I was thinking 55 or 60 inch. Contrary to what other people said surely it makes sense if I'm gonna buy a new TV to buy a 4k one even if I'm sat so far away?
#19
bbfb123
sxxychocolate
pop onto Panasonic's eBay refurb site for some rather good deals...stock changes happen a bit but some cracking bargains to be had :0).....15ft is quite far....nice big one would be your best bet.....nothing less then 55 inches. Oled will be beyond your stated budget....I'm in the market too, but waiting for this year's black Friday to rear it's monstrous bargain like head...I miss 3d.....
Yeah I was thinking 55 or 60 inch. Contrary to what other people said surely it makes sense if I'm gonna buy a new TV to buy a 4k one even if I'm sat so far away?

It wouldn't if there were Full HD options of the same quality and price. If you're not getting the benefits there's no point in putting up with the (minor) drawbacks.

But as such things are generally no longer being produced you should just ignore the resolution instead.
#20
bbfb123
sxxychocolate
pop onto Panasonic's eBay refurb site for some rather good deals...stock changes happen a bit but some cracking bargains to be had :0).....15ft is quite far....nice big one would be your best bet.....nothing less then 55 inches. Oled will be beyond your stated budget....I'm in the market too, but waiting for this year's black Friday to rear it's monstrous bargain like head...I miss 3d.....
Yeah I was thinking 55 or 60 inch. Contrary to what other people said surely it makes sense if I'm gonna buy a new TV to buy a 4k one even if I'm sat so far away?

Depends if you're paying a premium for something you can't see. Two downfalls are you need to sit closer and have access to HDR/4K content. Even SKY Q,Blu ray and netflix have limited 4K content, so at the moment it's just not worth it. Also I think SKY Q doesn't do HDR, though Virgin V6 does so you're stuck with Amazon Prime and Netflix. In the end you're paying out for something that will go mainstream in the next two years and probably by then HDMI 3.0 will be out and something else will be the new standard.

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