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Car MPG

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Hi, I'm a student who currently drives a Vauxhall Astra 1.6 60 plate and I'm currently getting 180 miles for £30 of fuel, which seems a bit for a student. Is that reasonable or should I be getti… Read More
Moqsy Avatar
6m, 2w agoPosted 6 months, 2 weeks ago
Hi,

I'm a student who currently drives a Vauxhall Astra 1.6 60 plate and I'm currently getting 180 miles for £30 of fuel, which seems a bit for a student.

Is that reasonable or should I be getting more for my money?

Also is there any modifications that I can do to my car that can increase the MPG?

Any help is much appreciated, Thanks!!
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Moqsy Avatar
6m, 2w agoPosted 6 months, 2 weeks ago
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#1
that's decent i think. in my car i get like 400 miles for 80£
#2
The best way to save petrol is not to use the car but if you have to don't accelerate too quickly and don't leave your football on the accelerator which standing still, be in the correct gear. Servicing and checking other thing will cost money so might not be worthwhile.
#3
Thats about 32 miles per gallon. Probably ok if more town driving.
#4
check tyre inflation. Air filter. redx.
#5
Making sure your tyre's are inflated to the correct pressure can help a little with fuel economy.

I definitely don't check mine as often as I should..
#6
Lots of things can effect mpg, you dont say if it is long or short, town or cross country mileage, or how many miles the car has done; I would expect better unless we are talking very short runs on congested roads.

Tyre choice is as important as tyre pressure, as road resistance varies a good deal, but remember, you want something that wont skid under normal wet use. Depending on you and your driving style, you may find the best pressure to be nearer the top of the min/max range.

Spark plugs, air filter and the correct oil - basically a good service can do wonders.

Try a different brand of petrol for a few tankfulls; my current car HATES Texaco fuel, but my sons old car loved it; he got 10% better mpg, I got 15% worse.

CLEAN the cars bodywork, a smooth, clean surface lowers the air friction and improves mpg.

Fit low profile wiper blades.

Use the gears to slow down when possible, most modern cars cut off the fuel feed to the engine when revs are above about 2000 rpm (for petrol cars) and the throttle is at idle, so going down a hill in 3rd can save you fuel AND brake wear.

Check out the engines torque/rev range, and try to keep the revs in the hi torque range; higher torque means the engine will accelerate the car more with less fuel being used, as you dont have to prod the go pedal so hard.
banned#7
we all say this at your age ;)
I remember myself asking Google.
a 1.4 petrol does the mile's for that price.
I moved to diesel, my 1.7 and 1.9 does much better, 80 miles for £10 so That's good.
#8
Erm have you told the car you want student discount and just how have you managed to get a 60 plate on student money?
#9
less weight in car the better. tyre pressure. use a good fuel cleaner in vehicle.use good fuel like shell or BP. keep vehicle serviced.
#10
get rid and buy a small diesel. Renault 1.5dci do 60+ mpg
#11
sofiasar
we all say this at your age ;)
I remember myself asking Google.
a 1.4 petrol does the mile's for that price.
I moved to diesel, my 1.7 and 1.9 does much better, 80 miles for £10 so That's good.


agree switch to a diesel.
#12
I have a Renault capture and I get around 250 miles for £20
#13
I would advise against buying a diesel unless your on the motorway daily & doing over 15k miles a year . modern diesels are a pain in the backside if used as local run abouts. EGR valves , dpf filters etc all very expensive to replace... & as a student that's the last thing u need. if the astra isn't giving u any issues , I'd stick with it
#14
look at getting a bike in the summer

£8 190 miles :))
#15
andrewmclachlan1
I have a Renault capture and I get around 250 miles for £20


What engine and fuel?

I get that with my Chrysler Ypsilon 1.3 diesel, which I only to town runs in.
#16
30-32mpg is surprisingly low for a 2010 car but a quick check on a average MPG submission site suggests it's normal for that engine:
http://www.honestjohn.co.uk/realmpg/vauxhall/astra-j-2009

The new Astra gets 40mpg+ from it's petrol engines, and the most efficient petrol engines in cars like that such as Peugeot's 1.2 and VW's 1.4 approach 50mpg or even surpass it for some drivers.

The best diesels do mid sixties in astra-sized cars, like Honda's Civic 1.6.
#17
chrisom
I would advise against buying a diesel unless your on the motorway daily & doing over 15k miles a year . modern diesels are a pain in the backside if used as local run abouts. EGR valves , dpf filters etc all very expensive to replace... & as a student that's the last thing u need. if the astra isn't giving u any issues , I'd stick with it


had diesels since 2003 (and petrol) including 3 Renaults and never had any issues with any of them.
but 2005+ diesels could give you the issues mentioned, just make sure you cane it ocasionally
#18
Gentle_Giant
Lots of things can effect mpg, you dont say if it is long or short, town or cross country mileage, or how many miles the car has done; I would expect better unless we are talking very short runs on congested roads.
Tyre choice is as important as tyre pressure, as road resistance varies a good deal, but remember, you want something that wont skid under normal wet use. Depending on you and your driving style, you may find the best pressure to be nearer the top of the min/max range.
Spark plugs, air filter and the correct oil - basically a good service can do wonders.
Try a different brand of petrol for a few tankfulls; my current car HATES Texaco fuel, but my sons old car loved it; he got 10% better mpg, I got 15% worse.
CLEAN the cars bodywork, a smooth, clean surface lowers the air friction and improves mpg.
Fit low profile wiper blades.
Use the gears to slow down when possible, most modern cars cut off the fuel feed to the engine when revs are above about 2000 rpm (for petrol cars) and the throttle is at idle, so going down a hill in 3rd can save you fuel AND brake wear.
Check out the engines torque/rev range, and try to keep the revs in the hi torque range; higher torque means the engine will accelerate the car more with less fuel being used, as you dont have to prod the go pedal so hard.

I would certainly agree with what you seen yourself with the different fuels in the different cars. My own Alfa Romeo Giulietta Quadrifoglio Verde petrol totally hates Asda or Tesco fuel, BP is soso, Maxol is 2nd best and believe it or not Maxol Super unleaded gives me the best (although BP Ultimate makes no difference to normal). Difference I seen was an extra days driving (or 2 compared to the supermarket fuel) for me even though getting less fuel for your money with the rough 10% extra premium price on the super unleaded. Fathers Skoda Fabia 1.2TFSI doesn't like supermarket fuel either but no difference in BP/Maxol nor with Super Unleaded/Ultimate. These where both brand new cars.

I would disagree with the rating on the tyres though as really not have them at the correct inflation rules out anything but lets take the below as an example.
Ratings go from A-G
Difference between A-G is 7.5%
Assuming each band is the same the difference ie in scale with each other from one to the other would be 1% roughly.

Now take average calculations for a perfect world on an A rated tyre.
10,000 miles per year
50mpg
£1.13 per Litre fuel
Total yearly fuel cost £1027.42

Take 1% difference for a B rated tyre as so fourth.
A Rated = £1027.42
B Rated = £1037.79
C Rated = £1040.38
G Rated =£1110.72

Now most tyres carry ratings between A-C and this is also assuming you are running on 4 tyres all carrying the same fuel rating as well. The difference would be £12.96 per year. Take that down to per tyre £3.24 saving and then remember when buying tyres these figures. As in paying an extra £10-£15 for an A Rating over a C rating is actually costing you money.
Yes yes I've bored everyone to death by now lol. Or another way to put it, driving with your window down would cost more in fuel than any differences in tyre ratings.




Edited By: cecilmcroberts on Nov 04, 2016 21:28: adding tyre ratings
#19
£11/12 pounds per 100 miles. 1998 Skoda felicia 1300 engine, done 109 k.
People stick to stereotypes , old = crap, DAHHH. Zero advisories last MOT PASS.
1300 cc = cheap insurance.CHAIN cam drive, last's forever. Rubber belts are stupid !
#20
Agree with the above warnings re. modern deisels.
Perhaps your best bet is to get a smaller and ligher car. I used to commute in a 1.2 Suzuki Swift SZ3, I was always amazed by the mpg being a petrol at about 40mpg.
#21
Owned 3 1.3 litre Fellys, great little cars for learning and basic commuting. I used to get nearly 40mpg out of them, and repairs are stupidly cheap.
Sadly, not many good ones left on the roads.
#22
bawbag666
If my calculations are correct, that would give you a MPG of around 28/29, which seems decent enough for a 1.6 petrol engine imo

I get 30.6mpg out of my 2.0L petrol S-Max.
#23
zombies
chrisom
I would advise against buying a diesel unless your on the motorway daily & doing over 15k miles a year . modern diesels are a pain in the backside if used as local run abouts. EGR valves , dpf filters etc all very expensive to replace... & as a student that's the last thing u need. if the astra isn't giving u any issues , I'd stick with it

had diesels since 2003 (and petrol) including 3 Renaults and never had any issues with any of them.
but 2005+ diesels could give you the issues mentioned, just make sure you cane it ocasionally

You're lucky, If you're doing the mileage they're fine.

Loads of people seem to recommend diesels without realising the problems they suffer with town driving.

All you have to do is look at the soot that comes out via the exhaust, all that soot is leaving deposits in the egr, turbo, manifold etc.. town driving, start/stop driving increases these deposits hence more problems. Petrol is much cleaner in comparison.

I would guess some of people suggesting diesel probably own fairly new cars and it does take some time for the carbon to build up.

When you've got a bill of £1000's for a new dpf your opinion might change.

The older diesels often suffer with egr and clogged turbos, the amount of turbos that break due to carbon build up is surprising. Most of the turbos can be cleaned and used again but if you go to a garage they'll just replace it and they aren't cheap and the problem might return because it maybe the clogged egr causing the extra carbon deposits in the turbo.!.

Here is a typical clogged egr

https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcS-XebfKwmXy71HjUAdqGxEupy5aqSo840gmfc02j4Akdgl0zlo

What they should look like.

http://www.vwgenuineparts.co.uk/images/03L131501K-373-1-800.jpg

A good solution is to have them remapped, disable the egr and have the dpf hollowed out. You'll also get more mpg as well as power.
banned#24
God... At 29mpg you might as well buy yourself a used Audi Quattro
#25
shauneco
zombies
chrisom
I would advise against buying a diesel unless your on the motorway daily & doing over 15k miles a year . modern diesels are a pain in the backside if used as local run abouts. EGR valves , dpf filters etc all very expensive to replace... & as a student that's the last thing u need. if the astra isn't giving u any issues , I'd stick with it
had diesels since 2003 (and petrol) including 3 Renaults and never had any issues with any of them.
but 2005+ diesels could give you the issues mentioned, just make sure you cane it ocasionally
You're lucky, If you're doing the mileage they're fine.
Loads of people seem to recommend diesels without realising the problems they suffer with town driving.
All you have to do is look at the soot that comes out via the exhaust, all that soot is leaving deposits in the egr, turbo, manifold etc.. town driving, start/stop driving increases these deposits hence more problems. Petrol is much cleaner in comparison.
I would guess some of people suggesting diesel probably own fairly new cars and it does take some time for the carbon to build up.
When you've got a bill of £1000's for a new dpf your opinion might change.
The older diesels often suffer with egr and clogged turbos, the amount of turbos that break due to carbon build up is surprising. Most of the turbos can be cleaned and used again but if you go to a garage they'll just replace it and they aren't cheap and the problem might return because it maybe the clogged egr causing the extra carbon deposits in the turbo.!.
Here is a typical clogged egr https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcS-XebfKwmXy71HjUAdqGxEupy5aqSo840gmfc02j4Akdgl0zlo
What they should look like.http://www.vwgenuineparts.co.uk/images/03L131501K-373-1-800.jpg
A good solution is to have them remapped, disable the egr and have the dpf hollowed out. You'll also get more mpg as well as power.

A good solution is to spend an hour on your yearly service and clean them!
#26
GAVINLEWISHUKD
shauneco
zombies
chrisom
I would advise against buying a diesel unless your on the motorway daily & doing over 15k miles a year . modern diesels are a pain in the backside if used as local run abouts. EGR valves , dpf filters etc all very expensive to replace... & as a student that's the last thing u need. if the astra isn't giving u any issues , I'd stick with it
had diesels since 2003 (and petrol) including 3 Renaults and never had any issues with any of them.
but 2005+ diesels could give you the issues mentioned, just make sure you cane it ocasionally
You're lucky, If you're doing the mileage they're fine.
Loads of people seem to recommend diesels without realising the problems they suffer with town driving.
All you have to do is look at the soot that comes out via the exhaust, all that soot is leaving deposits in the egr, turbo, manifold etc.. town driving, start/stop driving increases these deposits hence more problems. Petrol is much cleaner in comparison.
I would guess some of people suggesting diesel probably own fairly new cars and it does take some time for the carbon to build up.
When you've got a bill of £1000's for a new dpf your opinion might change.
The older diesels often suffer with egr and clogged turbos, the amount of turbos that break due to carbon build up is surprising. Most of the turbos can be cleaned and used again but if you go to a garage they'll just replace it and they aren't cheap and the problem might return because it maybe the clogged egr causing the extra carbon deposits in the turbo.!.
Here is a typical clogged egr https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcS-XebfKwmXy71HjUAdqGxEupy5aqSo840gmfc02j4Akdgl0zlo
What they should look like.http://www.vwgenuineparts.co.uk/images/03L131501K-373-1-800.jpg
A good solution is to have them remapped, disable the egr and have the dpf hollowed out. You'll also get more mpg as well as power.
A good solution is to spend an hour on your yearly service and clean them!

Yes, You can easily clean your egr, turbo and manifold, you can spray egr cleaner in the intake but much better to remove them and clean them, the egr especially as that is the main one that clogs up.

Dpf will clean itself when it regenerates but it does have it's limits, an Italian tuning works wonders.

Tbf though not many people would have cleaning them on their service schedule or they won't have the tools or ability etc..

If I had a diesel though, I'd defo have it remapped, had my last car remapped, well worth it.
#27
28/29mpg. My TypeR does that and i launch it around the city streets.
Got a focus 1.6 diesel and getting 59mpg out of that. Dont believe the 'you get more mpg on the motorway' hype it all goes down to how you drive the car all the time.

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