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Cider Press & Crusher

FonZe Avatar
9y, 3m agoPosted 9 years, 3 months ago
Afternoon all,

I have decided that im going to make some cider from the apples in the garden, so im looking for a good prtice for some equipment to get me started.

to start with i need a cider press (a pretty large one) and a fruit crusher.

Also some advice or webistes if you have made some in the past:thumbsup:

cheers
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FonZe Avatar
9y, 3m agoPosted 9 years, 3 months ago
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#1
The best apple/fruit press to buy is a "Vigo". Very well made and extremely sturdy. If you are going to make cider you will also need an apple crusher to crush the apples before they are pressed.

Have a look at this web site:

http://www.vigopresses.co.uk/store/pages.php?page=vigo_in_the_press

We've got the 12 litre press and Crusher A.

As with the best equipment, Vigo isn't cheap. They occasionally come up on Ebay, or failing that I seem to recall that Vigo have a sale around about late October/ November or it could have been early December (just after the apple pressing season!) when you could buy for next year's apple crop.
#2
bigblueballoon
The best apple/fruit press to buy is a "Vigo". Very well made and extremely sturdy. If you are going to make cider you will also need an apple crusher to crush the apples before they are pressed.

Have a look at this web site:

http://www.vigopresses.co.uk/store/pages.php?page=vigo_in_the_press

We've got the 12 litre press and Crusher A.

As with the best equipment, Vigo isn't cheap. They occasionally come up on Ebay, or failing that I seem to recall that Vigo have a sale around about late October/ November or it could have been early December (just after the apple pressing season!) when you could buy for next year's apple crop.


cheers bigblueballoon, have you made much cider? what was the final product like? any tips? :thumbsup:
#3
[SIZE=2]My mate has made perry for the last 2 years - he just bought a whole fruit juicer for £30 odd quid - it's a bit laborious having to keep emptying the pulp - but it does the job and when his trees get a bit bigger he may move on to a proper press.[/SIZE]
#4
Hi FonZe,

The basis of any cider is the fermentation of an apple juice. If you placed apple juice in a container with an air lock the natural yeast would start to ferment the juice and produce a rustic cider (scrumpy). However, this is extremely hit and miss, so IMHO I would suggest you make your cider with traditional brewing techniques.

1. Squeeze as much juice as you need, minimum 1 gallon, max 5 gallons for your first try. You will need a suitable container either a glass demi john or a plastic brewing container. Whichever you choose you will need a suitable bung with an air lock.

2. I suggest you kill the natural yeasts in the juice by using Campden tablets (1 tablet per gallon), this also allows you to transport the juice if you need to, from where you have pressed the juice to possibly home.

3. You then need to start the fermentation process from scratch. Add a purpose made brewing yeast (the type used for making homemade champagne is recommended). To get the best from the yeast you can buy a yeast nutrient (1 teaspoon a gallon) & pectolase which helps keep the juice clear.

4. Then seal your container and place an airlock filled with water on top. all seals can be made airtight with vasceline.

5. Place the container in a warm room without draughts, neither too hot nor too cold. The fermentation process will then start to take place and within a couple of days you should see bubbles coming through the airlock. this will become more agitated as time passes. The process will take between 7 and 21 days depending on sugar content and ambient air conditions etc..

6. When no more bubbles are produced the cider is ready for racking. This is where you use a piece of rubber tubing to syphon the liquid either into bottles or into a clean container.

7. If at this point you decide to bottle you can cork the cider and leave it to mature in the bottle for at least 3 months. If you wish to have a slightly sparking cider you can add a teaspoon of sugar to each bottle before racking, this will produce a mild second fermentation and a sighly sparkling drink. It's worth noting that this way will produce a small amount of sediment at the bottom of the bottle.

8. If on the other hand you decide to rack into a clean container this can be done 2 or 3 times before the bottling process and a far clearer cider will eventually be produced.

9. Throughout all the above processes everything must be scrupiously clean and Campden tablets should be used to sterilise.

10. All the cider equipment is available from brewing shops or the internet.

IMHO I think that this is the easiest way for your first time to make cider. However, as your skills develop the sugar content of your original juice can be checked with a hydrometer and if the sugar content of your apples is too low, sugar can be added, but I prefer to have a good mix of sweet and sour apples and have never had to add extra sugar. The sweeter the apple juice the higher the alcoholic content of your cider will be.

The cider will continue to improve up to a year and possibly up to 3. Store the cider in a dark place.

Then PARTY!!!

Hope this helps. We make gallons of the stuff (100 apple trees) and the kids all help; from collecting the apples, to crushing them, to pressing them. Although they don't drink the finished cider they do enjoy the freshly pressed apple juice.

Good luck , let us know how it goes!
#5
bigblueballoon
Hi FonZe,

The basis of any cider is the fermentation of an apple juice. If you placed apple juice in a container with an air lock the natural yeast would start to ferment the juice and produce a rustic cider (scrumpy). However, this is extremely hit and miss, so IMHO I would suggest you make your cider with traditional brewing techniques.

1. Squeeze as much juice as you need, minimum 1 gallon, max 5 gallons for your first try. You will need a suitable container either a glass demi john or a plastic brewing container. Whichever you choose you will need a suitable bung with an air lock.

2. I suggest you kill the natural yeasts in the juice by using Campden tablets (1 tablet per gallon), this also allows you to transport the juice if you need to, from where you have pressed the juice to possibly home.

3. You then need to start the fermentation process from scratch. Add a purpose made brewing yeast (the type used for making homemade champagne is recommended). To get the best from the yeast you can buy a yeast nutrient (1 teaspoon a gallon) & pectolase which helps keep the juice clear.

4. Then seal your container and place an airlock filled with water on top. all seals can be made airtight with vasceline.

5. Place the container in a warm room without draughts, neither too hot nor too cold. The fermentation process will then start to take place and within a couple of days you should see bubbles coming through the airlock. this will become more agitated as time passes. The process will take between 7 and 21 days depending on sugar content and ambient air conditions etc..

6. When no more bubbles are produced the cider is ready for racking. This is where you use a piece of rubber tubing to syphon the liquid either into bottles or into a clean container.

7. If at this point you decide to bottle you can cork the cider and leave it to mature in the bottle for at least 3 months. If you wish to have a slightly sparking cider you can add a teaspoon of sugar to each bottle before racking, this will produce a mild second fermentation and a sighly sparkling drink. It's worth noting that this way will produce a small amount of sediment at the bottom of the bottle.

8. If on the other hand you decide to rack into a clean container this can be done 2 or 3 times before the bottling process and a far clearer cider will eventually be produced.

9. Throughout all the above processes everything must be scrupiously clean and Campden tablets should be used to sterilise.

10. All the cider equipment is available from brewing shops or the internet.

IMHO I think that this is the easiest way for your first time to make cider. However, as your skills develop the sugar content of your original juice can be checked with a hydrometer and if the sugar content of your apples is too low, sugar can be added, but I prefer to have a good mix of sweet and sour apples and have never had to add extra sugar. The sweeter the apple juice the higher the alcoholic content of your cider will be.

The cider will continue to improve up to a year and possibly up to 3. Store the cider in a dark place.

Then PARTY!!!

Hope this helps. We make gallons of the stuff (100 apple trees) and the kids all help; from collecting the apples, to crushing them, to pressing them. Although they don't drink the finished cider they do enjoy the freshly pressed apple juice.

Good luck , let us know how it goes!


Nice one fella have some rep:thumbsup: ) looking at picking the apples in the next week or so, so i shall let you know how i get on :thumbsup:

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