Could anyone with experience in this respond quickly to this question... how does healthcare work in Australia, is it pretty much the same as UK? - HotUKDeals
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Could anyone with experience in this respond quickly to this question... how does healthcare work in Australia, is it pretty much the same as UK?

wellen1981 Avatar
2y, 4m agoPosted 2 years, 4 months ago
I need to present some info relating to healthcare in Australia to a hospital specialist here in the UK tomorrow afternoon and wondered if anyone could give me a general explanation as to how health care works in the land down under when people are ill? Anyone have any personal experience of Australian healthcare?

Cheers.
wellen1981 Avatar
2y, 4m agoPosted 2 years, 4 months ago
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(8) Jump to unreadPost an answer
Responses/page:
#1
You need medicare, either through an employer, state deductions or pay private.
#3
Happydundee
You need medicare, either through an employer, state deductions or pay private.

Ah i see, so no such thing as a UK equiv of national health then i take it?

btw some more specifics...

Crohns treatment in Australia is actually curing people of the disease and it revolves around 3 drugs. However, to present this info to specialists here i am trying to find some proper solid credible sources from eg Australian health bodies etc (think the Australian equiv of NICE) as well.

Is there a good place to start online to find out about Australian healthcare which may lead me to all relevant bodies in the healthcare world over there?

Sometimes local knowledge is so much better hence i posted this original question as only people who have lived there and been ill will really know this info easily.

Thanks already for answering me.
#5
Cheers both for taking the time to answer so quickly last night, I was up until 4am online getting all the info I needed from Australia for the Specialist today.

I would mark both as best answer if i could.

This sites value sometimes is not on the deals people post but on the actual community we have on here. Thanks

Edited By: wellen1981 on Jul 09, 2014 23:05: final response
#6
Hi , I notice you mention Crohns disease. I have a pal who may be interested in the treatment . Can you shed more light on this cure?
Thank you
#7
darklight
Hi , I notice you mention Crohns disease. I have a pal who may be interested in the treatment . Can you shed more light on this cure?
Thank you

Hi,
It is early days yet (minimum 2 years before this is likely to be recognised globally) and the progress is only being made in Oz but there is mounting research evidence to support the theory that crohns is cureable if researchers can identify which bacteria it is causing the condition.

I am under QE Hosp in Brum which is a University hospital so do carry out various medical research projects/trials (mainstream and fringe research) and if the opportunity presents itself I will likely volunteer myself for this trial if the QE ever create it (after giving it serious consideration and further research from a risk point of view of course).

(Here are the links and also the key relevant terms.)

Source: http://www.cdd.com.au/pages/disease_info/crohns_disease.html

(Here is the relevant info i found from the above link but the whole article should be read.)

For years, scientists have been searching for an infectious cause of Crohn's Disease. A growing body of evidence suggests that a bacterium called Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) may infect a genetically susceptible subgroup of the population resulting in Crohn's Disease. Researchers here at the Centre for Digestive Diseases have been instrumental in revealing this possibility and remain at the frontline of international research into this area.

Antibiotic agents
Koch’s postulates have now been fulfilled proving that in a subset of patients the bacterium Mycobacterium Avium Paratuberculosis (MAP) is involved in the development and persistence of inflammation in Crohn’s Disease. Antimycobacterial agents specifically targeting this causative pathogen have shown success in inducing remission in severe disease and may even prove to be able to cure the disease in a subset of patients. The Centre for Digestive Diseases is a leader in this area of research and recently an Australia-wide trial has been completed against MAP, the results of which have shown that the highest reported remission can be achieved with anti-MAP therapy. Unfortunately, the trial used sub therapeutic doses, failed to test patients before they were treated for MAP presence and did not replace patients who were given non dissolving Clofazimine drugs so that the long term maintenance part of the trial cannot be currently accepted as having any clinical significance. Certain clinical trials have also shown that broad-spectrum antibiotics such as metronidazole and ciprofloxacin also have benefit in the treatment of Crohn’s Disease but need to be taken long term as they have known anti-MAP activity.

Research
Crohn's Disease research has traditionally focussed on effective therapeutic relief of inflammatory symptoms. Recent efforts have shifted towards identifying specific infectious agents that may cause the disease. By targeting the particular causative agent with certain drugs, cure of Crohn's Disease is theoretically possible.

Anti-MAP. The bacterium, Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis (MAP), is an infectious cause of Crohn’s Disease. Its causality has been proven by the standard Koch’s postulates which have been fulfilled by culturing the pathogen from patients with Crohn’s Disease, causing the disease to be reproduced in experimental animals, and then culturing back the bacterium from the experimental animals. Hence, a subset of patients with Crohn’s Disease – estimated to be around 50% - are suffering from this chronic inflammation caused by infection with MAP which is found in milk, water and foods generally. Prof John Hermon-Taylor of St George Hospital, London first used double therapy consisting of specific antibiotics Rifabutin and Clarithromycin, and obtained marked reduction inflammation in patients with Crohn’s. Clinically the symptoms in these patients with severe Crohn’s improved indicating that no anti-inflammatory activity is required to treat the condition. The dosing and composition of the therapy was improved by researchers led by Dr Thomas Borody at the Centre for Digestive Diseases and achieved remarkable and dramatic reversal of inflammation with healing in Crohn’s Disease together with long term remission of symptoms in inflammation in many patients. Interestingly, a subgroup of patients who were first diagnosed at the Centre for Digestive Diseases and had never been given anti-inflammatory agents still healed with antibiotics alone. As with all infective agents Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis is not a single bacterium but has many subspecies and sensitivity profiles so that some of these bacteria respond much better than others as we see with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and with Helicobacter pylori. Other causes of Crohn’s like gut inflammation include Entamoeba histolytica and Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis. Strongyloides stercoralis can produce a very similar picture and the Doctors at the Centre for Digestive Diseases examine patients for all of these known infections because treatment with specific anti-infective agents can potentially reverse the condition. Indeed Tuberculosis of the GI tract is quite indistinguishable from Crohn’s Disease and even sometimes looking for the bacteria with PCR has difficulty in locating the curable Tuberculosis agent as colonoscopy and histology can not distinguish the diseases (Ref – Entamoeba Histolytica: Another cause of Crohn’s Disease. T.J. Borody et al. Abstract ACG 2009)




Source: http://www.health.wa.gov.au/snapshots/breakthrough_research.cfm



Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11926571

Treatment of severe Crohn's disease using antimycobacterial triple therapy--approaching a cure?
Borody TJ1, Leis S, Warren EF, Surace R.
Author information
Abstract
BACKGROUND:

Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis is probably the best candidate for a microbial cause of Crohn's disease although arguments to the contrary can be equally convincing. Growing evidence suggests that prolonged antimycobacterial combination therapy can improve Crohn's disease in some patients.
AIM:

To report long-term observations in patients with severe Crohn's disease treated with triple macrolide-based antimycobacterial therapy.
PATIENTS:

A series of 12 patients (7 male, 5 female; aged 15-42 years) with severe, obstructive or penetrating Crohn's disease were recruited.
METHODS:

Patients failing maximal therapy were commenced prospectively on a combination of rifabutin (450 mg/d), clarithromycin (750 mg/d) and clofazimine (2 mg/kg/d). Progress was monitored through colonoscopy, histology, clinical response and Harvey-Bradshaw activity index.
RESULTS:

Follow-up data were available for up to 54 months of therapy Six out of 12 patients experienced a full response to the antiMycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis combination achieving complete clinical, colonoscopic and histologic remission of Crohn's disease. Four of these patients were able to cease treatment after 24-46 months, 3 of whom remained in total remission without treatment for up to 26 months and one patient relapsed after six months off treatment. A partial response to the anti-Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis combination was seen in 2 patients showing complete clinical remission with mild histologic inflammation. Return to normal of terminal ileal strictures occurred in 5 patients. Harvey-Bradshaw activity index in patients showing a full or partial response to therapy fell from an initial 13.4 +/- 1. 91 to 0. 5 +/- 0. 47 [n = 8, p < 0. 001) after 52-54 months.
CONCLUSIONS:

Reversal of severe Crohn's disease has been achieved in 6/12 patients using prolonged combination anti-Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis therapy alone. Three patients remain in long-term remission with no detectable Crohn's disease off all therapy These results support a causal role for Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in Crohn's disease while also suggesting that a cure may become possible.
Comment in

Treatment with drugs active against Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis can heal Crohn's disease: more evidence for a neglected public health tragedy. [Dig Liver Dis. 2002]



Source: http://stomachpainafter-eating.com/

Evidence is mounting that Crohn's disease is not an autoimmune disease, but an immune response to a bacteria - most likely candidate being? "mycrobacterium avium paratuberculosis", responsible for "johne's disease" in cattle and other mammals. Look up Prof Tom Borody from Australia and also Prof. John Herman-Taylor. Borody invented the triple antibiotic therapy for helecobacter (stomach ulcers).
----
http://stomachpainafter-eating.com/



Edited By: wellen1981 on Jul 10, 2014 13:06: final info
#8
wellen1981
darklight
Hi , I notice you mention Crohns disease. I have a pal who may be interested in the treatment . Can you shed more light on this cure?
Thank you


Hi,
It is early days yet (minimum 2 years before this is likely to be recognised globally) and the progress is only being made in Oz but there is mounting research evidence to support the theory that crohns is cureable if researchers can identify which bacteria it is causing the condition.

I am under QE Hosp in Brum which is a University hospital so do carry out various medical research projects/trials (mainstream and fringe research) and if the opportunity presents itself I will likely volunteer myself for this trial if the QE ever create it (after giving it serious consideration and further research from a risk point of view of course).

(Here are the links and also the key relevant terms.)

Source: http://www.cdd.com.au/pages/disease_info/crohns_disease.html

(Here is the relevant info i found from the above link but the whole article should be read.)

For years, scientists have been searching for an infectious cause of Crohn's Disease. A growing body of evidence suggests that a bacterium called Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) may infect a genetically susceptible subgroup of the population resulting in Crohn's Disease. Researchers here at the Centre for Digestive Diseases have been instrumental in revealing this possibility and remain at the frontline of international research into this area.

Antibiotic agents
Koch’s postulates have now been fulfilled proving that in a subset of patients the bacterium Mycobacterium Avium Paratuberculosis (MAP) is involved in the development and persistence of inflammation in Crohn’s Disease. Antimycobacterial agents specifically targeting this causative pathogen have shown success in inducing remission in severe disease and may even prove to be able to cure the disease in a subset of patients. The Centre for Digestive Diseases is a leader in this area of research and recently an Australia-wide trial has been completed against MAP, the results of which have shown that the highest reported remission can be achieved with anti-MAP therapy. Unfortunately, the trial used sub therapeutic doses, failed to test patients before they were treated for MAP presence and did not replace patients who were given non dissolving Clofazimine drugs so that the long term maintenance part of the trial cannot be currently accepted as having any clinical significance. Certain clinical trials have also shown that broad-spectrum antibiotics such as metronidazole and ciprofloxacin also have benefit in the treatment of Crohn’s Disease but need to be taken long term as they have known anti-MAP activity.

Research
Crohn's Disease research has traditionally focussed on effective therapeutic relief of inflammatory symptoms. Recent efforts have shifted towards identifying specific infectious agents that may cause the disease. By targeting the particular causative agent with certain drugs, cure of Crohn's Disease is theoretically possible.

Anti-MAP. The bacterium, Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis (MAP), is an infectious cause of Crohn’s Disease. Its causality has been proven by the standard Koch’s postulates which have been fulfilled by culturing the pathogen from patients with Crohn’s Disease, causing the disease to be reproduced in experimental animals, and then culturing back the bacterium from the experimental animals. Hence, a subset of patients with Crohn’s Disease – estimated to be around 50% - are suffering from this chronic inflammation caused by infection with MAP which is found in milk, water and foods generally. Prof John Hermon-Taylor of St George Hospital, London first used double therapy consisting of specific antibiotics Rifabutin and Clarithromycin, and obtained marked reduction inflammation in patients with Crohn’s. Clinically the symptoms in these patients with severe Crohn’s improved indicating that no anti-inflammatory activity is required to treat the condition. The dosing and composition of the therapy was improved by researchers led by Dr Thomas Borody at the Centre for Digestive Diseases and achieved remarkable and dramatic reversal of inflammation with healing in Crohn’s Disease together with long term remission of symptoms in inflammation in many patients. Interestingly, a subgroup of patients who were first diagnosed at the Centre for Digestive Diseases and had never been given anti-inflammatory agents still healed with antibiotics alone. As with all infective agents Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis is not a single bacterium but has many subspecies and sensitivity profiles so that some of these bacteria respond much better than others as we see with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and with Helicobacter pylori. Other causes of Crohn’s like gut inflammation include Entamoeba histolytica and Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis. Strongyloides stercoralis can produce a very similar picture and the Doctors at the Centre for Digestive Diseases examine patients for all of these known infections because treatment with specific anti-infective agents can potentially reverse the condition. Indeed Tuberculosis of the GI tract is quite indistinguishable from Crohn’s Disease and even sometimes looking for the bacteria with PCR has difficulty in locating the curable Tuberculosis agent as colonoscopy and histology can not distinguish the diseases (Ref – Entamoeba Histolytica: Another cause of Crohn’s Disease. T.J. Borody et al. Abstract ACG 2009)




Source: http://www.health.wa.gov.au/snapshots/breakthrough_research.cfm



Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11926571

Treatment of severe Crohn's disease using antimycobacterial triple therapy--approaching a cure?
Borody TJ1, Leis S, Warren EF, Surace R.
Author information
Abstract
BACKGROUND:

Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis is probably the best candidate for a microbial cause of Crohn's disease although arguments to the contrary can be equally convincing. Growing evidence suggests that prolonged antimycobacterial combination therapy can improve Crohn's disease in some patients.
AIM:

To report long-term observations in patients with severe Crohn's disease treated with triple macrolide-based antimycobacterial therapy.
PATIENTS:

A series of 12 patients (7 male, 5 female; aged 15-42 years) with severe, obstructive or penetrating Crohn's disease were recruited.
METHODS:

Patients failing maximal therapy were commenced prospectively on a combination of rifabutin (450 mg/d), clarithromycin (750 mg/d) and clofazimine (2 mg/kg/d). Progress was monitored through colonoscopy, histology, clinical response and Harvey-Bradshaw activity index.
RESULTS:

Follow-up data were available for up to 54 months of therapy Six out of 12 patients experienced a full response to the antiMycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis combination achieving complete clinical, colonoscopic and histologic remission of Crohn's disease. Four of these patients were able to cease treatment after 24-46 months, 3 of whom remained in total remission without treatment for up to 26 months and one patient relapsed after six months off treatment. A partial response to the anti-Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis combination was seen in 2 patients showing complete clinical remission with mild histologic inflammation. Return to normal of terminal ileal strictures occurred in 5 patients. Harvey-Bradshaw activity index in patients showing a full or partial response to therapy fell from an initial 13.4 +/- 1. 91 to 0. 5 +/- 0. 47 [n = 8, p < 0. 001) after 52-54 months.
CONCLUSIONS:

Reversal of severe Crohn's disease has been achieved in 6/12 patients using prolonged combination anti-Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis therapy alone. Three patients remain in long-term remission with no detectable Crohn's disease off all therapy These results support a causal role for Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in Crohn's disease while also suggesting that a cure may become possible.
Comment in

Treatment with drugs active against Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis can heal Crohn's disease: more evidence for a neglected public health tragedy. [Dig Liver Dis. 2002]



Source: http://stomachpainafter-eating.com/

Evidence is mounting that Crohn's disease is not an autoimmune disease, but an immune response to a bacteria - most likely candidate being? "mycrobacterium avium paratuberculosis", responsible for "johne's disease" in cattle and other mammals. Look up Prof Tom Borody from Australia and also Prof. John Herman-Taylor. Borody invented the triple antibiotic therapy for helecobacter (stomach ulcers).
----
http://stomachpainafter-eating.com/



Hey , many thanks for the info, I'll be passing it on , cheers!!

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