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Diamond ring to diamond earrings

Ollibear Avatar
9y, 5m agoPosted 9 years, 5 months ago
I was wondering if anyone can help. It is my mum's 60th birthday very soon and she has always wanted a pair of diamond earrings but could never afford them. I was wondering if anyone had any ideas on cost of turning a diamond ring into earrings by melting down the platinum and using the diamonds. I am based in Surrey/ Hampshire area. Does anyone know approximate cost?? And can anyone recommend any jewellers?
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Ollibear Avatar
9y, 5m agoPosted 9 years, 5 months ago
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#1
I dont know about the cost of melting down the platinum but I have seen some beautiful earrings here

http://image.geraldonline.com/images/products/500/G02090093.jpg

[SIZE="4"]9ct White Gold 3 Diamond Set Loop Earrings
Item No: 02090093
Features:
Metal 9ct White Gold
Width 5mm
Length 8mm
Closure Butterfly
Stone Weight 0.09ct Diamond
Stone Cut 6 x Round[/SIZE]

[SIZE="7"]£59.99[/SIZE]
#2
I used to sell diamond jewellery, so i know quite a lot about it but i'm unaware of anywhere that performs the service you've requested and it would probably work out cheaper to keep the ring (thusly keeping an asset) and buy her a pair of diamond earrings because to custom make jewelery would be an expensive experience.

I don't recommend the earrings that Geek Girl has selected either, although they're pretty, the diamonds are very tiny, dividing 0.09ctw diamond into 6, would mean it's slightly bigger than diamond accents (diamond dust).

Considering she's always wanted diamond earrings, i think you'd have to spend more money, you can easily find a new pair on ebay for a good price, just make sure you buy from someone that has high feedback, so you know the gold is not only real but so is the diamonds, as there's a lot of cubic zerconia in circulation (cheap material that looks like diamond but has no value).

Remember, when you buy diamond, you have to look at the 4 C's which is:

CARAT = which is the size of the diamond

COLOUR = which is closeness of being as pure as possible in colour, the later the letterings are, the worse it is and has lower value and sparkle, so try and find something no worse than H-I in colour.

CLARITY = which is how clean the diamond is of imperfections, I3 clarity is the worse you can buy, which means it's got dirty spots inside the diamond visible to the naked eye and not only that, it will eventually shatter, which the whole point of a diamond is that they're supposed to last forever.
In order to keep costs down, try and buy no worse than SI3, which still has dirty marks but it's not visible to the eye, only after zooming in will the dirt be visable, obviously the better this is as well, the more the price will be.

CUT = The shape of the diamond, round is the most popular but baguette is up and coming but this is most important for your viewing pleassure in regard to the shape.
The cut needs to be perfected, as an over or undercut can decrease the light reflections passed throughout the diamond, meaning it will minimise the sparkle but most diamonds are well cut anyway but watch out for this.

If you decide to buy a diamond from a shop, bare in mind that it will sparkle magnificently but it won't have the same effect once you walk out the store, as they have perfectly placed artificial lighting in order to make the diamond sparkle from all angles.

Regarding the metal used, Carat basically means how much pure gold is in the base metal, so when 24ct gold is pure, for 9 you just turn it into a percentage by diving 9ct with 24.

e.g 9ct = 37.5% pure gold
14ct = 58.3% pure gold
18ct = 75% pure gold

No one really produces 22-24ct gold anymore, as gold is a soft metal and making it too close to 100% pure gold basically means the metal will mould around your finger and some cases, can snap, so it's best to stick to 9-18ct, which you can findout what it is by looking inside the golds base, which will contain a stamp.

I hope that helps, that took a while to write. :)
#3
thanks reallyfriendlyman, that was really comprehensive. I am aware of the 4 Cs, my husband bought my engagement ring from Tiffany & Co and had a lecture on diamonds, very interesting!!! I just thought it may be cheaper for one as all the materials are provided and two for sentimentality a ring that she can no longer wear as a diamond has fallen out can be reused to something she can wear. Again this ring was bought by my day almost 40 years ago!

Thanks for replying to my post!!
#4
Catrina
thanks reallyfriendlyman, that was really comprehensive. I am aware of the 4 Cs, my husband bought my engagement ring from Tiffany & Co and had a lecture on diamonds, very interesting!!! I just thought it may be cheaper for one as all the materials are provided and two for sentimentality a ring that she can no longer wear as a diamond has fallen out can be reused to something she can wear. Again this ring was bought by my day almost 40 years ago!

Thanks for replying to my post!!


It's a shame about the ring but you know you could always buy a stand alone diamond and then pay a jeweller to insert it into position for you.
At the end of the day ring that's been in the family will mean more to your nan because of the history behind, don't underestimate the sentiment behind an eternal item.

I'd also request a jeweller to put a valuation on the ring, as you can get this done for free for a simple figure or if you want an official written quoation that can be used for insurance purposes, most stores charge around £25 or 1% (whichever is greater).

The ring i'm wearing now was actually valued at £350, the stud was £280 and my bracelet is £900 and i should actually get some insurance myself, in case the worst happens.

If you need anymore advice, feel free to ask but i still recommend buying a new pair of diamond earrings. :)
#5
you could try a smaller independent gold or silversmith who could advise you on changing the ring to earings.

I got my engagement ring from http://www.ortondesign.com/ and they were great advising me, and eventually making me something slightly different to what they had "made up". It wasnt cheap, but the quality is first class and still gets commented on.

Also, I believe that new jewellery has VAT to pay on it, so if you look for some antique earings you will save yourself 17.5% straight away (and the dealer is more likely to haggle) and then you can get them reset, cleaned up etc.

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