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Digital SLR Camera for Beginners

ravishankarurp Avatar
7y, 9m agoPosted 7 years, 9 months ago
Hi Guys,

I am looking to buy a new Digital SLR.

I am not much into SLR photography, though I click a few good pics with my click-and-go canon digital auto-focus camera. Looking forward to take a step into the SLR world.

Want to click flowers/ natural landscapes mostly... Any ideas of what I should be looking for (ex: lens, iso, camera make, etc...)... would very helpful...

Thanks. Ravi.

PS: My range is £350-400 including extra lens, if I need them.
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ravishankarurp Avatar
7y, 9m agoPosted 7 years, 9 months ago
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#1
well I have been lookin at the Olympus E520 with a twin lens kit!! 14-40mm and 45-150mm and the cheapest I have found is £469.

I am stepping into the world of Digital SLRs as well !!
#2
I bought the Nikon D40 last year which is a great entry level DSLR when you consider the price. It is currently bundled with the 18-55mm lens for about £250 (latest price on Amazon). You can easily kit it out with more advanced lens once you get more experience. There are some good reviews on the net if you search for them, such as kenrockwell.com
#3
Me too.

looked at the Nikon D40, like the picture clarity, but my budget is around 180-200 ish.
#4
dhoumdhoum, you will be very lucky to find anything new for under £250. A Nikon D40 or a Sony A200 or an Olympus E420 will all be good options at around the £250 mark. Second hand on fleabay you might be able to pick up a Nikon D50 or D70s for under £200 or a Pentax *ist or K100D (others might be able to recommend cameras from other brands) but personally I'd save up until I could afford a £250 new camera.
#5
the main reason I am not looking at Canon or Nikon is that they don't have IS built into the body, the Nikon doesnt have a AF motor, and the kit lens isint supposed to be that great!! But I am sure they are cracking cameras!!

The olympus looks like good value for money so far. I'll go for it as soon as it gets into the £399 range!!
#6
ravishankarurp, do you have any experience with film SLRs?

Basically, any of the well known makes will have good cameras - Nikon, Canon, Sony, Olympus, Pentax, Samsung. Sony bought Minolta and are continuing with their technology. Samsung is basically rebranded Pentax and the lenses are interchangeable between Samsung and Pentax cameras.

Nikon and Canon will give you the best available range of lenses. More independent manufacturers make lenses for Nikon and Canon (Sigma, Tamron, and Tokina are probably the most popular) so best to stick to Nikon or Canon if you want the biggest lens choice. If you are only going to stick to the bundled lens and maybe just one other then it won't matter as much.

Sony has in-camera stabilisation in some cameras. Canon and Nikon both sell lenses with stabilisation but they are more expensive than the non-stabilised models. In lens stabilisation is meant to be better but the Sony option is a cheap way of having all stabilised lenses. (I believe that Pentax and Olympus might have in-body stabilisation in some of their bodies as well). More information here: http://www.bobatkins.com/photography/digital/image_stabilization.html
Note - if you can afford it then getting stabilisation is very worthwhile, especially if you like shooting in low light (early mornings / late evenings).

For landscapes you are likely to want a fairly wide lens. The standard supplied 18-55mm or 18-70mm lens on a Nikon or Canon will get you off to a good start but you will probably want to consider a wider lens soon. For close-up nature you might want to consider a close-up or macro lens (Nikon calls them micro). Proper macro lenses are expensive but you can get good priced ones on ebay. An independent Sigma wide zoom or macro lens will almost certainly be cheaper than a the original camera manufacturer's lens.

Start with just a body and standard bundled lens. That won't cost much more than just the camera body by itself and the standard lenses are usually light and useful for general snaps even if it isn't going to be the lens you use most in the long run. You will be able to work out what the limitations are fairly quickly.

I would recommend going into Jessops or John Lewis and actually trying one or two cameras in your hands. You might find that some are just too big and heavy and others too small and fiddly. Useability is as important as camera specifications IMO. John Lewis prices are usually very competitive with online prices as well.
#7
Have a look at some of the photography websites and see what people are using. Do you really need IS for flowers and landscapes? You could do with low noise, megapixels and quality lenses. No AF in the camera body, yet most professionals and serious amateurs are using Canons and Nikons, mostly so they have reliability and access to huge back catalogues of lenses. Olympus are of course two-thirds systems, doesn't suit everyone. Guys, have a good look at what's out there. What is the best DSLR for one person isn't necessarily the best for everyone.
#8
Look at the Pentax K-M with the twin lens.. its at Dixons and currys for £389.. I think good option if you are starting!!
#9
BlackCloud
Have a look at some of the photography websites and see what people are using. Do you really need IS for flowers and landscapes? You could do with low noise, megapixels and quality lenses. No AF in the camera body, yet most professionals and serious amateurs are using Canons and Nikons, mostly so they have reliability and access to huge back catalogues of lenses. Olympus are of course two-thirds systems, doesn't suit everyone. Guys, have a good look at what's out there. What is the best DSLR for one person isn't necessarily the best for everyone.


Not sure I'd agree that you don't need IS for flowers and landscapes. The best light for landscapes is often early morning or late evening and even a wide lens can benefit from an extra stop or two of IS at those times. It can make the difference between getting and missing a shot in lower light and you might find that you don't need to lug a tripod round so often if your lenses or body have IS built in.

All of the proper SLRs will give low noise and even the cheapest bundled lenses will give quality results compared to a compact camera with a small sensor.

Megapixels are irrelevant unless you are going to blow up images beyond A4. Any of the SLRs on the market right now will have 6 or more Megapixels and that's easily enough for good A4 prints.
#10
dhoomdhoom
Me too.

looked at the Nikon D40, like the picture clarity, but my budget is around 180-200 ish.


Mate has the nikon d40 ,takes awesome pictures. :thumbsup:
Got it from Tesco for around 240 with voucher.
#11
whats the best compact dig cam for ~ £200
#12
Spod
Not sure I'd agree that you don't need IS for flowers and landscapes. The best light for landscapes is often early morning or late evening and even a wide lens can benefit from an extra stop or two of IS at those times. It can make the difference between getting and missing a shot in lower light and you might find that you don't need to lug a tripod round so often if your lenses or body have IS built in.

All of the proper SLRs will give low noise and even the cheapest bundled lenses will give quality results compared to a compact camera with a small sensor.

Megapixels are irrelevant unless you are going to blow up images beyond A4. Any of the SLRs on the market right now will have 6 or more Megapixels and that's easily enough for good A4 prints.


Any good landscape or macro photographer will be using a tripod.

Megapixels aren't irrelevant, believe me I upgraded from a 6 to 12 megapixel DSLR and they are different beasts. More megapixels give you more flexibility to crop and edit your pictures.

I agree that the cheapest DSLR will be better than a compact, but I would have thought we were trying to achieve the best quality for a minimal price here so sometimes luxuries like IS can be forfeited for the sake of better glass or a better body. Many professionals don't have IS.

IS is useful, I have it on two lenses, but most of the time I don't use it.
#13
BlackCloud
Any good landscape or macro photographer will be using a tripod.


Perhaps that's because they are old fashioned and aren't using IS! :-D

$
BlackCloud
Megapixels aren't irrelevant, believe me I upgraded from a 6 to 12 megapixel DSLR and they are different beasts. More megapixels give you more flexibility to crop and edit your pictures.


That's only true to a certain extent. It won't make much difference if you frame well and don't need to crop by more than 10-20% max. I suspect that your 12MP camera is a far better machine and it's not just the megapixel rating that is making the difference but the image processing capabilities of the new box.

I suggest you read these:
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/02/08/technology/08pogue.html
http://www.kenrockwell.com/tech/mpmyth.htm
#14
Spod
Perhaps that's because they are old fashioned and aren't using IS! :-D

$

That's only true to a certain extent. It won't make much difference if you frame well and don't need to crop by more than 10-20% max. I suspect that your 12MP camera is a far better machine and it's not just the megapixel rating that is making the difference but the image processing capabilities of the new box.

I suggest you read these:
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/02/08/technology/08pogue.html
http://www.kenrockwell.com/tech/mpmyth.htm


I have read what Rockwell says etc. At the end of the day you have more flexibility with more megapixels. It doesn't matter what i (or you) say or whether i am right or wrong, the world is moving to more megapixels and IS and thats the way it is.:thumbsup:
#15
BlackCloud
the world is moving to more megapixels and IS and thats the way it is.:thumbsup:


That's certainly true - it's a shame they aren't putting more effort into increasing dynamic range rather than just pushing up megapiuxel counts though. Have some rep by the way! :thumbsup:
#16
i have the fujifinepix s5700, i sugest the s5800 (more megapixels) its cheap it does the job, im using it as a stepping stone till iget used to it and then get myself a better one. if youre just a beginner no point spending too much as its what you do with it that counts not the most buttons etc.

good luck

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