Do i need a "cctv" sticker? - HotUKDeals
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Do i need a "cctv" sticker?

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Thinking of having cctv and the owners next door have voiced their concern Read More
raptorcigs Avatar
1w, 4d agoPosted 1 week, 4 days ago
Thinking of having cctv and the owners next door have voiced their concern
raptorcigs Avatar
1w, 4d agoPosted 1 week, 4 days ago
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#1
If the cameras are watching your own property and not public can't see the problem. Mind you, when a local car thief moved in a few doors down at my old address I installed a tiny camera pointing at my car in a communal car park. I didn't tell any neighbours cause they were all the same low life scumbags.
#2
nope you don't. Will it be pointing on to there front/back garden/path?

I've got cctv hooked up to the front an back of the house? neighbour got the lip up and said she would speak to council as I wouldn't take it down.

I politely told her that when or if her car gets damaged/stolen or the house gets robbed don't come asking me for cctv footage for the police :|
#3
If it was just pointing at the road to cover cars and happened to look at my car, I wouldn't be upset at all. Maybe your neighbours are having affairs and don't want to be captured!
#4
As long as you can't see your neighbours property through it they can't do a thing. You can point it at public areas eg: your car parked in the street but make sure you can't see your neighbours properties/land.
CCTV signs are just to warn burglars to wear balaclavas whilst they burgle you so they can't be recognised.

Edited By: toiletseatlicker on Jun 13, 2017 10:39
#5
Thanx LFR
#6
toiletseatlicker
As long as you can't see your neighbours property through it they can't do a thing. You can point it at public areas eg: your car parked in the street but make sure you can't see your neighbours properties/land.
CCTV signs are just to warn burglars to wear balaclavas whilst they burgle you so they can't be recognised.


It can point at your own property yes. But if if it points to a public place then a single complaint is enough to have to council force you to take it down.
#8
ThugBasher
nope you don't. Will it be pointing on to there front/back garden/path?

I've got cctv hooked up to the front an back of the house? neighbour got the lip up and said she would speak to council as I wouldn't take it down.

I politely told her that when or if her car gets damaged/stolen or the house gets robbed don't come asking me for cctv footage for the police :|


Too right. Who will be crying for help then.
#9
We have 3 cameras up in a terraced street. It does over see the public foot path and down the street. There is no such law that states you cannot position the camera to over see your personal property.

Over the years we have had the police turn up to view the footage to help them with crimes never have they said anything different.

The police only became aware we have CCTV cause of crimes on 2 of our vehicles.
#10
blue791
It can point at your own property yes. But if if it points to a public place then a single complaint is enough to have to council force you to take it down.


Thats nonsense, there are no laws to stop you filming on a public highway.
#11
timelordofgallifrey
blue791
toiletseatlicker
As long as you can't see your neighbours property through it they can't do a thing. You can point it at public areas eg: your car parked in the street but make sure you can't see your neighbours properties/land.
CCTV signs are just to warn burglars to wear balaclavas whilst they burgle you so they can't be recognised.
It can point at your own property yes. But if if it points to a public place then a single complaint is enough to have to council force you to take it down.
Thats nonsense, there are no laws to stop you filming on a public highway.


The ICO explains how this is related to the Data Protection Act.

Possibly of interest:

What if my camera captures footage of individuals beyond the boundaries of my property?

You must consider whether it is necessary for your camera to operate beyond the boundary of your property.

If your camera covers, even partially, any areas beyond the boundaries of your property, such as neighbouring gardens or the street, then it will no longer be exempt from the Data Protection Act (DPA) under the domestic purposes exemption. This does not mean that you are breaching the DPA but it does mean that you might need to take some steps to comply with it.

Source - https://ico.org.uk/for-the-public/cctv/

Edited By: RossD89 on Jun 13, 2017 12:17
#12
We have cctv and I wouldn't. Give a stuff what the nbrs say they cover our property and my nbrs asked if we could turn the cameras to cover they drive as well as ours so we said ok the camera. At the front covers. Our car and front of the house we had our garage. Broken. Into 5years ago so we bought the swann cctv system its. A good investment. Go for it
#13
RossD89
timelordofgallifrey
blue791
toiletseatlicker
As long as you can't see your neighbours property through it they can't do a thing. You can point it at public areas eg: your car parked in the street but make sure you can't see your neighbours properties/land.
CCTV signs are just to warn burglars to wear balaclavas whilst they burgle you so they can't be recognised.
It can point at your own property yes. But if if it points to a public place then a single complaint is enough to have to council force you to take it down.
Thats nonsense, there are no laws to stop you filming on a public highway.
The ICO explains how this is related to the Data Protection Act.
Possibly of interest:
What if my camera captures footage of individuals beyond the boundaries of my property?
You must consider whether it is necessary for your camera to operate beyond the boundary of your property.
If your camera covers, even partially, any areas beyond the boundaries of your property, such as neighbouring gardens or the street, then it will no longer be exempt from the Data Protection Act (DPA) under the domestic purposes exemption. This does not mean that you are breaching the DPA but it does mean that you might need to take some steps to comply with it.
Source - https://ico.org.uk/for-the-public/cctv/

You can film and take images on public property provided you are not causing a breech of the peace in doing so i.e. deliberatly filming a neibour with intent to harass.Otherwise every holiday maker in the UK would be restricted on what they could or could not film.
#14
arachnoid
RossD89
timelordofgallifrey
blue791
toiletseatlicker
As long as you can't see your neighbours property through it they can't do a thing. You can point it at public areas eg: your car parked in the street but make sure you can't see your neighbours properties/land.
CCTV signs are just to warn burglars to wear balaclavas whilst they burgle you so they can't be recognised.
It can point at your own property yes. But if if it points to a public place then a single complaint is enough to have to council force you to take it down.
Thats nonsense, there are no laws to stop you filming on a public highway.
The ICO explains how this is related to the Data Protection Act.
Possibly of interest:
What if my camera captures footage of individuals beyond the boundaries of my property?
You must consider whether it is necessary for your camera to operate beyond the boundary of your property.
If your camera covers, even partially, any areas beyond the boundaries of your property, such as neighbouring gardens or the street, then it will no longer be exempt from the Data Protection Act (DPA) under the domestic purposes exemption. This does not mean that you are breaching the DPA but it does mean that you might need to take some steps to comply with it.
Source - https://ico.org.uk/for-the-public/cctv/
You can film and take images on public property provided you are not causing a breech of the peace in doing so i.e. deliberatly filming a neibour with intent to harass.Otherwise every holiday maker in the UK would be restricted on what they could or could not film.


To be honest, I'm not overly bothered on the rights and wrongs of private CCTV as I'm sure most, if not all, people on this thread (and the wider populace) would use it sensibly, but as the legality of using CCTV came up I thought that it would be prudent to source a credible authority on the matter.

What I quoted does not state or imply that using CCTV to capture public spaces is illegal, nor was the quote intended to advocate such use. I simply quoted it to inform.

Apologies if that was not clear.

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