Does anyone use a voltage optimiser to reduce power bills ?x - HotUKDeals
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Does anyone use a voltage optimiser to reduce power bills ?x

£0.00 @
Voltage over 220 Volts AC increases power bills. ref : http://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/i.html?_trksid=p2050601.m570.l1313&_nkw=voltage%20optimiser&_sacat=0&_from=R40 https://webcache.googleusercontent… Read More
ian292 Avatar
6m, 1w agoPosted 6 months, 1 week ago
Best Answer
mainly in commercial applications 3 phase motors ect can't see it being of advantage in a residencial enviroment
I think razord is correct kettle would take longer to boil microwaves would see a drop in power output ???

Edited By: flickflack on Dec 11, 2016 21:19

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#1
No, because it doesn't work. If you lower the voltage the appliance just draws more amps - it's the same wattage. You might find the odd device is slightly more efficient at certain voltages but we're talking fractions of a penny a month here...
#2
Rubbish, sorry.

Your bill is metered in KW @240v, which is voltage x current; as it enters the house.

In theory we harmonised with Yewrope at 220V, but as there is a +/- 10% tolerance, we just kept 240V (10% of 220V = 22V, so 240V is within tolerance)

There is a way of cheating without obvious modification to the electric meter, but voltage isnt it, and push it too far and the electric company will pick it up remotely, as it will affect other users as well.
And it isnt cheap + needs some big, rather obvious equipment.
#3
You are billed on power ie watts . The main proportion of anyone's electrical bill will be heat producing things ( oven, kettle , heaters , electric blanket etc) . If you have say 220V instead of 240 it will take extra time to boil the kettle , the oven will pull more amps to create the same heat (same kwatts) etc so it won't reduce your bill . Maybe computers, teles etc could run on 220V probably less but as they will all have built in voltage stabilisers (of some sort) it won't make any difference . Maybe save £5- £10 a year max (similar to not leaving your electronic stuff on standby ) - is it worth it ?


Edited By: rogparki on Dec 11, 2016 21:04: add
#4
Gentle_Giant
Rubbish, sorry.

Your bill is metered in KW @240v, which is voltage x current; as it enters the house.

In theory we harmonised with Yewrope at 220V, but as there is a +/- 10% tolerance, we just kept 240V (10% of 220V = 22V, so 240V is within tolerance)

There is a way of cheating without obvious modification to the electric meter, but voltage isnt it, and push it too far and the electric company will pick it up remotely, as it will affect other users as well.
And it isnt cheap + needs some big, rather obvious equipment.
You have it right - but defeat your own argument :( you are billed per kw (not necessarily at 240V)- think about it oO



Edited By: rogparki on Dec 11, 2016 21:06: add
#5
mainly in commercial applications 3 phase motors ect can't see it being of advantage in a residencial enviroment
I think razord is correct kettle would take longer to boil microwaves would see a drop in power output ???

Edited By: flickflack on Dec 11, 2016 21:19
#6
[/quote] You have it right -but defeat your own argument - think about it oO[/quote]
Not really, even if it made a difference (which it doesnt - as someone above has explained), lowering the voltage after the meter makes no difference as the leccy is at 240V going through it, and trying to dig up the house feed and messing around with it is likely to get him killed, as well as get him cut off and prosecuted the millisecond the electricity board find out.

The only "safe" way to cheat is a lot more subtle than lowering the voltage, and if you get caught, they can be very harsh on how much extra they bill you, so much so that factories spend £100,000s on bulky machinery to make sure they keep their electricity supply balanced and within the limits the suppliers allow them.
(I know, I used to build the machines).

If you want to save money, switch to LED lights, reduce the water and room temperatures a few degrees, and make sure the house is properly insulated.

Or spend thousands on solar panels, which will pay for themselves in about 15-20 years.

Improving house insulation doesnt have to be expensive either; I made a huge improvement just by identifying where a lot of heat was escaping and fixing it. Heating bill went down by ~20% during the winter, and the average temperature in the room effected went up by 8 degrees C.
And the fix cost me a few hours of time, a can of expanding foam, and a bag of beanbag polystyrene beads.

Even replacing the curtains with thermal lined ones can make a big difference.
#7
Gentle_Giant
You have it right -but defeat your own argument - think about it oO[/quote]Not really, even if it made a difference (which it doesnt - as someone above has explained), lowering the voltage after the meter makes no difference as the leccy is at 240V going through it, and trying to dig up the house feed and messing around with it is likely to get him killed, as well as get him cut off and prosecuted the millisecond the electricity board find out.
The only "safe" way to cheat is a lot more subtle than lowering the voltage, and if you get caught, they can be very harsh on how much extra they bill you, so much so that factories spend £100,000s on bulky machinery to make sure they keep their electricity supply balanced and within the limits the suppliers allow them.
(I know, I used to build the machines).
If you want to save money, switch to LED lights, reduce the water and room temperatures a few degrees, and make sure the house is properly insulated.
Or spend thousands on solar panels, which will pay for themselves in about 15-20 years.
Improving house insulation doesnt have to be expensive either; I made a huge improvement just by identifying where a lot of heat was escaping and fixing it. Heating bill went down by ~20% during the winter, and the average temperature in the room effected went up by 8 degrees C.
And the fix cost me a few hours of time, a can of expanding foam, and a bag of beanbag polystyrene beads.
Even replacing the curtains with thermal lined ones can make a big difference.[/quote]
Absolutely correct - So why did you say the first reply was Quote "Rubbish " ? You really ought to make up your mind :(

Edited By: rogparki on Dec 11, 2016 21:20
#8
As far as 220V vs 240V goes...
Things with switch mode power supplies will simply draw more current to make up for the lower voltage: Power saved - NONE.
Some things will simply produce less output - kettle would boil slower.
Some motor gear might be more efficient, though individually directed start/run reduction - eg. the Fridge savaplug would be more effective.

The voltage conversion is not going to be 100% lossless, so the few things where it does potentially make a difference will probably be swallowed up by the inherent losses on things which regulate their own power.
#9
rogparki

Absolutely correct - So why did you say the first reply was Quote "Rubbish " ? You really ought to make up your mind :(

I think gg was saying rubbish to the device and the OP, not to the first reply.
#10
What a load of crock there is absolutly no saving in using an "energy saver" that drops the voltage
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zKasA4HxaGY

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