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eBay treat their sellers pretty bad

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Sold an item last month on eBay it was new and in immaculate condition. The seller returned the item saying it didn't work. When I received it it was broken , the speaker inside was rattling about and… Read More
skintgirl6 Avatar
7m, 2w agoPosted 7 months, 2 weeks ago
Sold an item last month on eBay it was new and in immaculate condition. The seller returned the item saying it didn't work. When I received it it was broken , the speaker inside was rattling about and it was scratched and scruffy. I actually think they had swapped it with another item but I couldn't prove it. And eBay sided with the buyer. £95.00 out of pocket but my own fault for not taking more precautions. But how do you against something like this? Make a note of serial numbers etc?

Has anyone else had similar experience?

Sorry for the post just my way of ranting ha
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skintgirl6 Avatar
7m, 2w agoPosted 7 months, 2 weeks ago
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Top Responses

(1)
Sorry to hear of your incident. Some things to consider:

Short videos on your phone are better than pictures as you can demonstrate the condition of the item - especially for those items which may not have a screen, e.g. the record player mentioned. Ensure you include serials, part numbers, and anything else that uniquely identifies it. Videos are harder to forge than pictures.

For anything of high value, stating pick up in person helps or consider delivering it yourself. If you do either of these, make sure you have a friend at home or with you for your safety.

Check their history, and decide how low # of feedback you are prepared to accept.

Insure the item when posted (depending on the value). If it is damaged or fails, you can claim it was postage which broke it.

Definitely track the package, and once it has been delivered, contact the buyer immediately and ask them for confirmation of the item and that it is working. If it dies after a couple of weeks, then it is definitely a grey area. If you have owned the item (and have proof) for a reasonable time, the likelihood of it failing after it has been received and confirmed as working is small. This should also count in your favour.

Take a video of you packing the item as proof also.

Mention all the videos / pictures / posting approach in your ebay listings and explain that this is because of dishonest buyers that you are forced to take such measures. Do not post serial information in your listing - even for electronics devices, they can be scammed.

Then as mentioned, if things go wrong, give eBay grief until they resolve it. Ultimately they dont want to spend out any money for fraudulent buyers or sellers. If you have sufficient proof, then eBay cannot deny you, else take them to the small claims court. They will settle before it gets there if you have the proof.

Oh and rest assured, there are scammers on Gumtree. Except there, your only recourse is the small claims court. You still need to take the same precautions. In addition, if someone comes to pick it up, ensure you get them to sign a piece of paper which shows they accept the item as sold. Ensure you have a simple proof of ID e.g. drivers license. Better still photo their ID with the item.

Like all forms of security, and here we are talking about securing your item, it is a threshold you are trying to create which will put the scammers / fraudsters off buying from you and alas looking elsewhere. The more expensive the item, the higher you need to try and make the threshold.

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#1
yeah selling on ebay stopped being worthwhile a long time ago unless you are a business seller
#2
Always take photographs of the item and serial numbers. eBay charge the seller 10% but always side with the buyer unless you can 100% prove its not the same item you shipped. I always use Gumtree first - free and local - then resort to eBay if I have to
#3
JC2MULTIPLAYER000
yeah selling on ebay stopped being worthwhile a long time ago unless you are a business seller


The buyers do the same to the business sellers.
#4
japes
Always take photographs of the item and serial numbers. eBay charge the seller 10% but always side with the buyer unless you can 100% prove its not the same item you shipped. I always use Gumtree first - free and local - then resort to eBay if I have to
What would you do thought if there is no evidence either way? I.e. seller sells something, the buyer receives it and claims it's not working. Who's side do you take?
#5
I think the same happened to me when I sold a turntable a few years ago for £70. Like you I couldn't prove it though.
#6
japes
Always take photographs of the item and serial numbers. eBay charge the seller 10% but always side with the buyer unless you can 100% prove its not the same item you shipped. I always use Gumtree first - free and local - then resort to eBay if I have to

Doesn't make any difference - take photographs etc etc - if a buyer wants to mess you about they will ALWAYS win. the service ebay give to sellers is appalling and given that the sellers pay to list on ebay and pay their final value fees well it is a scandal.
#7
Would also like to know as happened to me twice. Firstly, I sold a Nintendo DS which was reported as broken by buyer and when returned was obviously a different one. I then sold a job lot of genuine technical Lego. Buyer falsely reported it to EBay as megablocks and only returned 4 out of the 7 models they received. Paypal refunded them the whole amount! I've sold a few more items, but as collection only and insist on cash, but doing this usually means less buyers join the auction, so a lower selling price.
#8
ipswich78
japes
Always take photographs of the item and serial numbers. eBay charge the seller 10% but always side with the buyer unless you can 100% prove its not the same item you shipped. I always use Gumtree first - free and local - then resort to eBay if I have to
What would you do thought if there is no evidence either way? I.e. seller sells something, the buyer receives it and claims it's not working. Who's side do you take?
eBay always go with the buyer - part of their guarantee - not always fair on the sellers but its the only way eBay can increase their sales.
#9
holeymoley18
Would also like to know as happened to me twice. Firstly, I sold a Nintendo DS which was reported as broken by buyer and when returned was obviously a different one. I then sold a job lot of genuine technical Lego. Buyer falsely reported it to EBay as megablocks and only returned 4 out of the 7 models they received. Paypal refunded them the whole amount! I've sold a few more items, but as collection only and insist on cash, but doing this usually means less buyers join the auction, so a lower selling price.
Use Gumtree - local sales does equal lower selling point but factor in the 10% ebay fee then 3% paypal fee and you're probably even
#10
Yeah, photo of serial number in the description on ebay in case of issues like this might help, then you can prove its a different item if returned and also to ebay who can see the listing.

Unfortunately it seems that ebay is increasing in these types of issues but there are still some decent buyers out there. I just sold an item for almost £200 and went through perfectly. A buyer did try the whole fraudulent transaction thing last year with a game though. I accepted a best offer, sent it recorded and then the whole reverse transaction thing happened. Paypal initially sided with them until I sent in proof of delivery and explanation. Sided with me in the end and all money credited back.

Edited By: MichyM on Dec 06, 2016 10:26
#11
ipswich78
japes
Always take photographs of the item and serial numbers. eBay charge the seller 10% but always side with the buyer unless you can 100% prove its not the same item you shipped. I always use Gumtree first - free and local - then resort to eBay if I have to
What would you do thought if there is no evidence either way? I.e. seller sells something, the buyer receives it and claims it's not working. Who's side do you take?


What ebay should be doing is looking at the buyer history- their feedback that they leave for others and the bullying pms they send to sellers. They should be looking at the seller's impeccable feedback when makijng a judgement. Ebay dont look at any of that they couldnt give a hoot about the seller. I have my own solution - buyer beware lol


Edited By: memmmememe on Dec 06, 2016 10:27
#12
Had something similar happen to me. What you need to do is phone up eBay constantly and hassle them about it. Post on eBay's facebook page so that everyone can see, they're more likely to help you then. I reported the buyer to fraud and received the full amount back.
#13
I sold a iphone 6s on eBay. Brand new and working absolutely fine! buyer had it for 2 weeks and complained it wasn't working! ebay obviously sided with the buyer and they sent the phone back which I couldn't get into and was deemed useless to me. Broken phone and out of pocket! absolute scum! :(
#14
I presume if you sell regularly on EBay a generic footnote on your auctions - for instance, " High definition photos taken of all items and serial numbers prior to listing " , might just put off some of the pondlife who are simply trying to replace their old broken items .

Edited By: rogparki on Dec 06, 2016 10:30
#15
rogparki
I presume if you sell regularly on EBay a generic footnote on your auctions -say, " High definition photos taken of all items and serial numbers prior to listing " , might just put off some of the pondlife who are simply trying to replace their old broken items .

You would think that would work wouldn't you - NOPE
#16
memmmememe
rogparki
I presume if you sell regularly on EBay a generic footnote on your auctions -say, " High definition photos taken of all items and serial numbers prior to listing " , might just put off some of the pondlife who are simply trying to replace their old broken items .
You would think that would work wouldn't you - NOPE
I did say "some" of the pondlife , sadly there are so many scammers around these days :( . I'm glad I don't sell on EBay these days .
#17
i won a case against a buyer who tried a similar thing on but had loads of photos which proved the item i sent was in good condition and they were after a discount on the item
always take pictures of serial numbers packaging etc but do NOT display the serial to the buyer as some even resort to label switching
#18
i hate ebay ever since a buyer said he didn't receive a ds i sold , yet a week later was selling the games that i sold with it :{
i messaged ebay as 1 of the games had a rip on the packaging in exactly the same spot , they didn't care .
#19
I've had people claim they haven't received things even though it's signed for but I claim back off royal mail. I don't sell expensive things on eBay, I would be furious if this happened to me
#20
rogparki
memmmememe
rogparki
I presume if you sell regularly on EBay a generic footnote on your auctions -say, " High definition photos taken of all items and serial numbers prior to listing " , might just put off some of the pondlife who are simply trying to replace their old broken items .
You would think that would work wouldn't you - NOPE
I did say "some" of the pondlife , sadly there are so many scammers around these days :( . I'm glad I don't sell on EBay these days .


Possibly and then you have the other pondlife that do paypal chargebacks - they often have ripped off sellers so many times on ebay that they then resort to bypassing ebay and doing paypal chargebacks. There's an anwer for them too - a little unethical to post here - again buyers should be very careful.

Edited By: memmmememe on Dec 06, 2016 10:41
#21
And then AND THEN !!! some of the ripper offers have the cheek to leave you a negative feedback and ebay wont remove it 99% of the time.
#22
Be very careful selling items. Like others have said try to get as much evidence as possible before shipping.

Similar thing happened to a friend of mine. Sold a code for a digital download for a game. Guy requested a refund claiming his ebay account was hacked, after the game code was used. Obviously ebay took his side and refunded the lot. Friend was then out of pocket £25, the game code and then ebay applied a fee for the refund. He closed his account and told them to jog on.
#23
I thought I'd got myself a proper bargain when I won an auction for something, the price I paid was too good to be true! Despite the seller originally ignoring my message that I hadn't received it, he responded to my second message advising that it must have got "lost" in the post and refunded my money, no quibble, and obviously not involving the Royal Mail! Suspicious? Much? I fully believe he never posted the item in the first place and will re-list it in the future hoping for a better price. What can I do about it? Nothing! Ebay is useless, there isn't even anywhere I can contact them to complain about this.
#24
Deeds13
I thought I'd got myself a proper bargain when I won an auction for something, the price I paid was too good to be true! Despite the seller originally ignoring my message that I hadn't received it, he responded to my second message advising that it must have got "lost" in the post and refunded my money, no quibble, and obviously not involving the Royal Mail! Suspicious? Much? I fully believe he never posted the item in the first place and will re-list it in the future hoping for a better price. What can I do about it? Nothing! Ebay is useless, there isn't even anywhere I can contact them to complain about this.


Ok so you came across a shoddy seller - but you didn't lose any money did you? The OP has lost a serious amount of cash
#25
Sorry to hear of your incident. Some things to consider:

Short videos on your phone are better than pictures as you can demonstrate the condition of the item - especially for those items which may not have a screen, e.g. the record player mentioned. Ensure you include serials, part numbers, and anything else that uniquely identifies it. Videos are harder to forge than pictures.

For anything of high value, stating pick up in person helps or consider delivering it yourself. If you do either of these, make sure you have a friend at home or with you for your safety.

Check their history, and decide how low # of feedback you are prepared to accept.

Insure the item when posted (depending on the value). If it is damaged or fails, you can claim it was postage which broke it.

Definitely track the package, and once it has been delivered, contact the buyer immediately and ask them for confirmation of the item and that it is working. If it dies after a couple of weeks, then it is definitely a grey area. If you have owned the item (and have proof) for a reasonable time, the likelihood of it failing after it has been received and confirmed as working is small. This should also count in your favour.

Take a video of you packing the item as proof also.

Mention all the videos / pictures / posting approach in your ebay listings and explain that this is because of dishonest buyers that you are forced to take such measures. Do not post serial information in your listing - even for electronics devices, they can be scammed.

Then as mentioned, if things go wrong, give eBay grief until they resolve it. Ultimately they dont want to spend out any money for fraudulent buyers or sellers. If you have sufficient proof, then eBay cannot deny you, else take them to the small claims court. They will settle before it gets there if you have the proof.

Oh and rest assured, there are scammers on Gumtree. Except there, your only recourse is the small claims court. You still need to take the same precautions. In addition, if someone comes to pick it up, ensure you get them to sign a piece of paper which shows they accept the item as sold. Ensure you have a simple proof of ID e.g. drivers license. Better still photo their ID with the item.

Like all forms of security, and here we are talking about securing your item, it is a threshold you are trying to create which will put the scammers / fraudsters off buying from you and alas looking elsewhere. The more expensive the item, the higher you need to try and make the threshold.
#26
Stu_Bert
Sorry to hear of your incident. Some things to consider:
Short videos on your phone are better than pictures as you can demonstrate the condition of the item - especially for those items which may not have a screen, e.g. the record player mentioned. Ensure you include serials, part numbers, and anything else that uniquely identifies it. Videos are harder to forge than pictures.
For anything of high value, stating pick up in person helps or consider delivering it yourself. If you do either of these, make sure you have a friend at home or with you for your safety.
Check their history, and decide how low # of feedback you are prepared to accept.
Insure the item when posted (depending on the value). If it is damaged or fails, you can claim it was postage which broke it.
Definitely track the package, and once it has been delivered, contact the buyer immediately and ask them for confirmation of the item and that it is working. If it dies after a couple of weeks, then it is definitely a grey area. If you have owned the item (and have proof) for a reasonable time, the likelihood of it failing after it has been received and confirmed as working is small. This should also count in your favour.
Take a video of you packing the item as proof also.
Mention all the videos / pictures / posting approach in your ebay listings and explain that this is because of dishonest buyers that you are forced to take such measures. Do not post serial information in your listing - even for electronics devices, they can be scammed.
Then as mentioned, if things go wrong, give eBay grief until they resolve it. Ultimately they dont want to spend out any money for fraudulent buyers or sellers. If you have sufficient proof, then eBay cannot deny you, else take them to the small claims court. They will settle before it gets there if you have the proof.
Oh and rest assured, there are scammers on Gumtree. Except there, your only recourse is the small claims court. You still need to take the same precautions. In addition, if someone comes to pick it up, ensure you get them to sign a piece of paper which shows they accept the item as sold. Ensure you have a simple proof of ID e.g. drivers license. Better still photo their ID with the item.
Like all forms of security, and here we are talking about securing your item, it is a threshold you are trying to create which will put the scammers / fraudsters off buying from you and alas looking elsewhere. The more expensive the item, the higher you need to try and make the threshold.


That all sounds so logical to a normal person but trust me it all falls away in favour of the buyer if the buyer wants to create a problem..
#27
Isn't it sad that it's happened to so many others. I will definitely sell via gumtree / local selling sites from now on. It just isn't worth the risk is it
#28
skintgirl6
Isn't it sad that it's happened to so many others. I will definitely sell via gumtree / local selling sites from now on. It just isn't worth the risk is it

Well it is like this - high street shops gets shoplifted from every day and likewise eBay sellers get shoplifted from every day too albeit in an online environment. Only difference with high street is that if caught the thief goes to court........
#29
memmmememe
skintgirl6
Isn't it sad that it's happened to so many others. I will definitely sell via gumtree / local selling sites from now on. It just isn't worth the risk is it
Well it is like this - high street shops gets shoplifted from every day and likewise eBay sellers get shoplifted from every day too albeit in an online environment. Only difference with high street is that if caught the thief goes to court........
Yes very true when look at it like that . You speak a lot of sense!

Good luck with deer everyone!
#30
I take a video of most things I sell including electrical,put on your advert you have done this
#31
memmmememe
Stu_Bert
Sorry to hear of your incident. Some things to consider:
Short videos on your phone are better than pictures as you can demonstrate the condition of the item - especially for those items which may not have a screen, e.g. the record player mentioned. Ensure you include serials, part numbers, and anything else that uniquely identifies it. Videos are harder to forge than pictures.
For anything of high value, stating pick up in person helps or consider delivering it yourself. If you do either of these, make sure you have a friend at home or with you for your safety.
Check their history, and decide how low # of feedback you are prepared to accept.
Insure the item when posted (depending on the value). If it is damaged or fails, you can claim it was postage which broke it.
Definitely track the package, and once it has been delivered, contact the buyer immediately and ask them for confirmation of the item and that it is working. If it dies after a couple of weeks, then it is definitely a grey area. If you have owned the item (and have proof) for a reasonable time, the likelihood of it failing after it has been received and confirmed as working is small. This should also count in your favour.
Take a video of you packing the item as proof also.
Mention all the videos / pictures / posting approach in your ebay listings and explain that this is because of dishonest buyers that you are forced to take such measures. Do not post serial information in your listing - even for electronics devices, they can be scammed.
Then as mentioned, if things go wrong, give eBay grief until they resolve it. Ultimately they dont want to spend out any money for fraudulent buyers or sellers. If you have sufficient proof, then eBay cannot deny you, else take them to the small claims court. They will settle before it gets there if you have the proof.
Oh and rest assured, there are scammers on Gumtree. Except there, your only recourse is the small claims court. You still need to take the same precautions. In addition, if someone comes to pick it up, ensure you get them to sign a piece of paper which shows they accept the item as sold. Ensure you have a simple proof of ID e.g. drivers license. Better still photo their ID with the item.
Like all forms of security, and here we are talking about securing your item, it is a threshold you are trying to create which will put the scammers / fraudsters off buying from you and alas looking elsewhere. The more expensive the item, the higher you need to try and make the threshold.
That all sounds so logical to a normal person but trust me it all falls away in favour of the buyer if the buyer wants to create a problem..

I do agree, you can set a threshold to put some off, but it will not put off everyone. Similarly, the fraudsters work on a threshold. Are you prepared to go to take people to court over £30 for instance? Everyone has a threshold for the effort vs the "reward", whether you are selling or trying to rip a seller off. And that's irrespective of gumtree, ebay or an add in the newspaper.
#32
As well as seriel numbers use a security pen ( ultraviolet ) and take a photo for your proof
#33
A security pen would help in your case. But how do you prove the item marked is what you posted ?

In miy case I had a new unopened B&O stylus in it's original packaging from the manufacturer. It still had the security tape on it from when I bought it. I photographed it and sent it. The buyer claimed the package was empty when they opened it. Ebay took the buyers side and refunded them.

I protested and ebay say they referred it to their fraud investigation department. However, due to 'data protection' ebay wouldn't tell me the outcome of their investigation and whether they struck the buyer off. I lost my money on the sale as I had to refund paypal. I couldn't prove the manufacturer had put the stylus in their packaging as it was security sealed. I lost £200 !!! Paypal refunded the buyer and chased me several times daily until I paid the cash back to them.

I won't sell anything of high value now on ebay unless it's cash on collection. .

The police took details but wouldn't help in the case. As the buyer was nearly 300 miles away I couldn't even go there.

Edited By: jonnithomas on Dec 06, 2016 12:47
#34
jonnithomas
A security pen would help in your case. But how do you prove the item marked is what you posted ?
In miy case I had a new unopened B&O stylus in it's original packaging from the manufacturer. It still had the security tape on it from when I bought it. I photographed it and sent it. The buyer claimed the package was empty when they opened it. Ebay took the buyers side and refunded them.
I protested and ebay say they referred it to their fraud investigation department. However, due to 'data protection' ebay wouldn't tell me the outcome of their investigation and whether they struck the buyer off. I lost my money on the sale as I had to refund paypal. I couldn't prove the manufacturer had put the stylus in their packaging as it was security sealed. I lost £200 !!! Paypal refunded the buyer and chased me several times daily until I paid the cash back to them.
I won't sell anything of high value now on ebay unless it's cash on collection. .
The police took details but wouldn't help in the case. As the buyer was nearly 300 miles away I couldn't even go there.
No way?! That is awful, they get away with it.
#35
memmmememe
ipswich78
japes
Always take photographs of the item and serial numbers. eBay charge the seller 10% but always side with the buyer unless you can 100% prove its not the same item you shipped. I always use Gumtree first - free and local - then resort to eBay if I have to
What would you do thought if there is no evidence either way? I.e. seller sells something, the buyer receives it and claims it's not working. Who's side do you take?
What ebay should be doing is looking at the buyer history- their feedback that they leave for others and the bullying pms they send to sellers. They should be looking at the seller's impeccable feedback when makijng a judgement. Ebay dont look at any of that they couldnt give a hoot about the seller. I have my own solution - buyer beware lol
Odd, often the sellers don't protect themselves correctly. I've got nearly 800 feedback about 75% of which is for selling, the only issue I had is something went missing in the post which I decided to go cheap on and not pay for tracking. Less learnt, since then no issues...
#36
Ebay isn't very good for you as a seller. I had a buyer outside the uk my auction was UK only they got round the signup process by using a po box I refused to sell the item to them and refunded them they left me negative feedback and I pointed out to ebay it was against their t&c to have an account in the uk if you live else where in europ but they didn't care and sided with the potential scammer.
#37
jonnithomas
A security pen would help in your case. But how do you prove the item marked is what you posted ?
In miy case I had a new unopened B&O stylus in it's original packaging from the manufacturer. It still had the security tape on it from when I bought it. I photographed it and sent it. The buyer claimed the package was empty when they opened it. Ebay took the buyers side and refunded them.
I protested and ebay say they referred it to their fraud investigation department. However, due to 'data protection' ebay wouldn't tell me the outcome of their investigation and whether they struck the buyer off. I lost my money on the sale as I had to refund paypal. I couldn't prove the manufacturer had put the stylus in their packaging as it was security sealed. I lost £200 !!! Paypal refunded the buyer and chased me several times daily until I paid the cash back to them.
I won't sell anything of high value now on ebay unless it's cash on collection. .
The police took details but wouldn't help in the case. As the buyer was nearly 300 miles away I couldn't even go there.

That's difficult, and disappointing, sorry to hear.

Perhaps a couple of things that might help others...

1) Insure the item. If the buyer claimed it was empty, then you have to claim off the courier and claim the item was removed.

2) Weigh the item. Doesn't stop fraudulent people inserting something of the same weight, but if the buyer claims it was empty, but as part of posting you have the weight recorded (which you have to for them to calculate the postage cost), then you can highlight to ebay.

Ultimately only the insurance protects you (to a degree, as much as any insurance does) to cover the cost of the item. I wouldn't give the courier the full details, otherwise they might not pay up.

Cash on pickup still leaves you exposed to people claiming it broke...

The pen is worth doing if you have one, but proving someone 300 miles away has sold it on or still has it is nigh impossible.

I'm not sure Data Protection covers what eBay claimed, sounds like ignorance to me, not that it helps you :(
#38
Stu_Bert
jonnithomas
A security pen would help in your case. But how do you prove the item marked is what you posted ?
In miy case I had a new unopened B&O stylus in it's original packaging from the manufacturer. It still had the security tape on it from when I bought it. I photographed it and sent it. The buyer claimed the package was empty when they opened it. Ebay took the buyers side and refunded them.
I protested and ebay say they referred it to their fraud investigation department. However, due to 'data protection' ebay wouldn't tell me the outcome of their investigation and whether they struck the buyer off. I lost my money on the sale as I had to refund paypal. I couldn't prove the manufacturer had put the stylus in their packaging as it was security sealed. I lost £200 !!! Paypal refunded the buyer and chased me several times daily until I paid the cash back to them.
I won't sell anything of high value now on ebay unless it's cash on collection. .
The police took details but wouldn't help in the case. As the buyer was nearly 300 miles away I couldn't even go there.
That's difficult, and disappointing, sorry to hear.
Perhaps a couple of things that might help others...
1) Insure the item. If the buyer claimed it was empty, then you have to claim off the courier and claim the item was removed.
2) Weigh the item. Doesn't stop fraudulent people inserting something of the same weight, but if the buyer claims it was empty, but as part of posting you have the weight recorded (which you have to for them to calculate the postage cost), then you can highlight to ebay.
Ultimately only the insurance protects you (to a degree, as much as any insurance does) to cover the cost of the item. I wouldn't give the courier the full details, otherwise they might not pay up.
Cash on pickup still leaves you exposed to people claiming it broke...
The pen is worth doing if you have one, but proving someone 300 miles away has sold it on or still has it is nigh impossible.
I'm not sure Data Protection covers what eBay claimed, sounds like ignorance to me, not that it helps you :(


In my issue tho it was a stylus which weighs next to nothing and is tiny (less than the tip of your little finger) so weighing wouldn't help. It was insured as I sent it by Parcelforce 48 however, they could prove it was delivered and that the signature confirms the package was unopened.

All I could try to do was contact B&O but as I had bought it years earlier as a spare in a shop that had closed down there was no chance there either. The manufacturer's packaging was sealed so I had no proof that the stylus was inside their packaging. I believe the integrity of B&O tho and not the buyer.
#39
Stu_Bert
Sorry to hear of your incident. Some things to consider:
Short videos on your phone are better than pictures as you can demonstrate the condition of the item - especially for those items which may not have a screen, e.g. the record player mentioned. Ensure you include serials, part numbers, and anything else that uniquely identifies it. Videos are harder to forge than pictures.
For anything of high value, stating pick up in person helps or consider delivering it yourself. If you do either of these, make sure you have a friend at home or with you for your safety.
Check their history, and decide how low # of feedback you are prepared to accept.
Insure the item when posted (depending on the value). If it is damaged or fails, you can claim it was postage which broke it.
Definitely track the package, and once it has been delivered, contact the buyer immediately and ask them for confirmation of the item and that it is working. If it dies after a couple of weeks, then it is definitely a grey area. If you have owned the item (and have proof) for a reasonable time, the likelihood of it failing after it has been received and confirmed as working is small. This should also count in your favour.
Take a video of you packing the item as proof also.
Mention all the videos / pictures / posting approach in your ebay listings and explain that this is because of dishonest buyers that you are forced to take such measures. Do not post serial information in your listing - even for electronics devices, they can be scammed.
Then as mentioned, if things go wrong, give eBay grief until they resolve it. Ultimately they dont want to spend out any money for fraudulent buyers or sellers. If you have sufficient proof, then eBay cannot deny you, else take them to the small claims court. They will settle before it gets there if you have the proof.
Oh and rest assured, there are scammers on Gumtree. Except there, your only recourse is the small claims court. You still need to take the same precautions. In addition, if someone comes to pick it up, ensure you get them to sign a piece of paper which shows they accept the item as sold. Ensure you have a simple proof of ID e.g. drivers license. Better still photo their ID with the item.
Like all forms of security, and here we are talking about securing your item, it is a threshold you are trying to create which will put the scammers / fraudsters off buying from you and alas looking elsewhere. The more expensive the item, the higher you need to try and make the threshold.

Except that EBay don't accept video evidence only pictures, I asked to post a video of a laptop that I sold that was returned as not working and had a video of it before it was sent and after it was returned and it was working in both instances, I had to pay postage to send it and refund the item plus their postage, EBay sucks nowadays.
#40
jonnithomas
Stu_Bert
jonnithomas
A security pen would help in your case. But how do you prove the item marked is what you posted ?
In miy case I had a new unopened B&O stylus in it's original packaging from the manufacturer. It still had the security tape on it from when I bought it. I photographed it and sent it. The buyer claimed the package was empty when they opened it. Ebay took the buyers side and refunded them.
I protested and ebay say they referred it to their fraud investigation department. However, due to 'data protection' ebay wouldn't tell me the outcome of their investigation and whether they struck the buyer off. I lost my money on the sale as I had to refund paypal. I couldn't prove the manufacturer had put the stylus in their packaging as it was security sealed. I lost £200 !!! Paypal refunded the buyer and chased me several times daily until I paid the cash back to them.
I won't sell anything of high value now on ebay unless it's cash on collection. .
The police took details but wouldn't help in the case. As the buyer was nearly 300 miles away I couldn't even go there.
That's difficult, and disappointing, sorry to hear.
Perhaps a couple of things that might help others...
1) Insure the item. If the buyer claimed it was empty, then you have to claim off the courier and claim the item was removed.
2) Weigh the item. Doesn't stop fraudulent people inserting something of the same weight, but if the buyer claims it was empty, but as part of posting you have the weight recorded (which you have to for them to calculate the postage cost), then you can highlight to ebay.
Ultimately only the insurance protects you (to a degree, as much as any insurance does) to cover the cost of the item. I wouldn't give the courier the full details, otherwise they might not pay up.
Cash on pickup still leaves you exposed to people claiming it broke...
The pen is worth doing if you have one, but proving someone 300 miles away has sold it on or still has it is nigh impossible.
I'm not sure Data Protection covers what eBay claimed, sounds like ignorance to me, not that it helps you :(
In my issue tho it was a stylus which weighs next to nothing and is tiny (less than the tip of your little finger) so weighing wouldn't help. It was insured as I sent it by Parcelforce 48 however, they could prove it was delivered and that the signature confirms the package was unopened.
All I could try to do was contact B&O but as I had bought it years earlier as a spare in a shop that had closed down there was no chance there either. The manufacturer's packaging was sealed so I had no proof that the stylus was inside their packaging. I believe the integrity of B&O tho and not the buyer.

I thought the insurance also covers you for it being opened by the courier, even though it wasn't, clearly not :(

And yes, I have a dunlop systemdek II, but I genuinely thought it would still show up a difference between it being there and not...

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