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Electric Query

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Sockets keep tripping on fuse box, unplugged EVERYTHING as you do and flipped it back on.. Keeps popping seconds later. Advise? Read More
AStonedRaichu Avatar
4m, 2w agoPosted 4 months, 2 weeks ago
Sockets keep tripping on fuse box, unplugged EVERYTHING as you do and flipped it back on..

Keeps popping seconds later.

Advise?
AStonedRaichu Avatar
4m, 2w agoPosted 4 months, 2 weeks ago
Options
Best Answer
That looks like an ip enclosure of some type, but the fogging inside the clear plastic switch cover would suggest it is no longer water proof.

And yeah, it looks like it looks like a bodge job, probably the water has come in through the screw holes at the back, where it is fixed to the wall.

Externals like this MUST be protected with an ELCB (Earth Leakage Circuit Breaker), if the leccy company saw this they could cut off power to your house until it was made safe.

All Responses

(23) Jump to unreadPost an answer
Responses/page:
#1
Dodgy socket or wire somewhere. Get an electrician in to trace.
#2
Get an electrician in... wouldn't be the first time a mouse has chewed a cable somewhere behind the wall!
#3
Damp/water in one of the sockets, or a damaged cable.

Done any drilling or wallpaper stripping recently??

Kettle base unplugged??, Had mould growing in a base once, tracked enough current to trip the house

Look at, and feel around every socket; if you cannot find anything, then you need to get a qualified sparky in.

You are looking for burnt spots, cable damage or water.

(I'm a retired sparky)
#4
Have you tried isolating the individual mcbs to see what circuit it is on?
#5
Gentle_Giant
Damp/water in one of the sockets, or a damaged cable.
Done any drilling or wallpaper stripping recently??
Kettle base unplugged??, Had mould growing in a base once, tracked enough current to trip the house
Look at, and feel around every socket; if you cannot find anything, then you need to get a qualified sparky in.
You are looking for burnt spots, cable damage or water.
(I'm a retired sparky)

Every socket in the house is secure, everything is unplugged. No interior changes so damage to wiring unlikely.

However now that you mention it, there's an outdoor plug socket on the same circuit in the back garden. Seems the only obvious explanation now.

Cheers lads
#6
themorgatron
Have you tried isolating the individual mcbs to see what circuit it is on?

Downstairs sockets pal
#7
AStonedRaichu
themorgatron
Have you tried isolating the individual mcbs to see what circuit it is on?
Downstairs sockets pal

It's obvious once I re-read the initial post, sorry :D
#8
AStonedRaichu
Gentle_Giant
Damp/water in one of the sockets, or a damaged cable.
Done any drilling or wallpaper stripping recently??
Kettle base unplugged??, Had mould growing in a base once, tracked enough current to trip the house
Look at, and feel around every socket; if you cannot find anything, then you need to get a qualified sparky in.
You are looking for burnt spots, cable damage or water.
(I'm a retired sparky)
Every socket in the house is secure, everything is unplugged. No interior changes so damage to wiring unlikely.
However now that you mention it, there's an outdoor plug socket on the same circuit in the back garden. Seems the only obvious explanation now.
Cheers lads

External sockets should be protected by an ELCB and rated IP65, NOT connected to the normal ring main.

If this is the cause, you need to get it altered.
#9
Gentle_Giant
AStonedRaichu
Gentle_Giant
Damp/water in one of the sockets, or a damaged cable.
Done any drilling or wallpaper stripping recently??
Kettle base unplugged??, Had mould growing in a base once, tracked enough current to trip the house
Look at, and feel around every socket; if you cannot find anything, then you need to get a qualified sparky in.
You are looking for burnt spots, cable damage or water.
(I'm a retired sparky)
Every socket in the house is secure, everything is unplugged. No interior changes so damage to wiring unlikely.
However now that you mention it, there's an outdoor plug socket on the same circuit in the back garden. Seems the only obvious explanation now.
Cheers lads
External sockets should be protected by an ELCB and rated IP65, NOT connected to the normal ring main.
If this is the cause, you need to get it altered.

Neither the patio light or the outdoor socket is working since the fuse tripped so I'm presuming they must be on the same circuit or they would still work.

I'll call the Sparky out cheers pal
#10
AStonedRaichu
Gentle_Giant
AStonedRaichu
Gentle_Giant
Damp/water in one of the sockets, or a damaged cable.
Done any drilling or wallpaper stripping recently??
Kettle base unplugged??, Had mould growing in a base once, tracked enough current to trip the house
Look at, and feel around every socket; if you cannot find anything, then you need to get a qualified sparky in.
You are looking for burnt spots, cable damage or water.
(I'm a retired sparky)
Every socket in the house is secure, everything is unplugged. No interior changes so damage to wiring unlikely.
However now that you mention it, there's an outdoor plug socket on the same circuit in the back garden. Seems the only obvious explanation now.
Cheers lads
External sockets should be protected by an ELCB and rated IP65, NOT connected to the normal ring main.
If this is the cause, you need to get it altered.
Neither the patio light or the outdoor socket is working since the fuse tripped so I'm presuming they must be on the same circuit or they would still work.
I'll call the Sparky out cheers pal


OK, glad to be of help. Min spec for external is (I think) IP54 in a sheltered placement, but IP65 is much better protection and usually not much more expensive.
#11
Gentle_Giant
AStonedRaichu
Gentle_Giant
AStonedRaichu
Gentle_Giant
Damp/water in one of the sockets, or a damaged cable.
Done any drilling or wallpaper stripping recently??
Kettle base unplugged??, Had mould growing in a base once, tracked enough current to trip the house
Look at, and feel around every socket; if you cannot find anything, then you need to get a qualified sparky in.
You are looking for burnt spots, cable damage or water.
(I'm a retired sparky)
Every socket in the house is secure, everything is unplugged. No interior changes so damage to wiring unlikely.
However now that you mention it, there's an outdoor plug socket on the same circuit in the back garden. Seems the only obvious explanation now.
Cheers lads
External sockets should be protected by an ELCB and rated IP65, NOT connected to the normal ring main.
If this is the cause, you need to get it altered.
Neither the patio light or the outdoor socket is working since the fuse tripped so I'm presuming they must be on the same circuit or they would still work.
I'll call the Sparky out cheers pal
OK, glad to be of help. Min spec for external is (I think) IP54 in a sheltered placement, but IP65 is much better protection and usually not much more expensive.

https://s30.postimg.org/pro634bcx/IMG_2761.jpg

No power going to it, (I know it usually works I use it to do lawn) basically a wire comes out of the wall to it and the patio light. No IP65 and from what I can tell (I'm no Sparky) it's just coming from a loop on an internal socket.

Think this is the problem?

Was like this when I moved in. Waiting for sparky to get back to me about coming out.

Edited By: AStonedRaichu on Dec 08, 2016 14:21
#12
That looks like an ip enclosure of some type, but the fogging inside the clear plastic switch cover would suggest it is no longer water proof.

And yeah, it looks like it looks like a bodge job, probably the water has come in through the screw holes at the back, where it is fixed to the wall.

Externals like this MUST be protected with an ELCB (Earth Leakage Circuit Breaker), if the leccy company saw this they could cut off power to your house until it was made safe.
#13
AStonedRaichu
Gentle_Giant
AStonedRaichu
Gentle_Giant
AStonedRaichu
Gentle_Giant
Damp/water in one of the sockets, or a damaged cable.
Done any drilling or wallpaper stripping recently??
Kettle base unplugged??, Had mould growing in a base once, tracked enough current to trip the house
Look at, and feel around every socket; if you cannot find anything, then you need to get a qualified sparky in.
You are looking for burnt spots, cable damage or water.
(I'm a retired sparky)
Every socket in the house is secure, everything is unplugged. No interior changes so damage to wiring unlikely.
However now that you mention it, there's an outdoor plug socket on the same circuit in the back garden. Seems the only obvious explanation now.
Cheers lads
External sockets should be protected by an ELCB and rated IP65, NOT connected to the normal ring main.
If this is the cause, you need to get it altered.
Neither the patio light or the outdoor socket is working since the fuse tripped so I'm presuming they must be on the same circuit or they would still work.
I'll call the Sparky out cheers pal
OK, glad to be of help. Min spec for external is (I think) IP54 in a sheltered placement, but IP65 is much better protection and usually not much more expensive.
https://s30.postimg.org/pro634bcx/IMG_2761.jpg
No power going to it, (I know it usually works I use it to do lawn) basically a wire comes out of the wall to it and the patio light. No IP65 and from what I can tell (I'm no Sparky) it's just coming from a loop on an internal socket.
Think this is the problem?
Was like this when I moved in. Waiting for sparky to get back to me about coming out.


Loving the dodgy child guard in an external socket with missing door. That is rubbish.
#14
Gentle_Giant
That looks like an ip enclosure of some type, but the fogging inside the clear plastic switch cover would suggest it is no longer water proof.
And yeah, it looks like it looks like a bodge job, probably the water has come in through the screw holes at the back, where it is fixed to the wall.
Externals like this MUST be protected with an ELCB (Earth Leakage Circuit Breaker), if the leccy company saw this they could cut off power to your house until it was made safe.

Gave your feedback to Sparky and he concurred with your conclusion, disconnected power to exterior socket and solved issue. Getting socket and light replaced and wired correctly when he gets the parts cheers pal.


mas99
AStonedRaichu
Gentle_Giant
AStonedRaichu
Gentle_Giant
AStonedRaichu
Gentle_Giant
Damp/water in one of the sockets, or a damaged cable.
Done any drilling or wallpaper stripping recently??
Kettle base unplugged??, Had mould growing in a base once, tracked enough current to trip the house
Look at, and feel around every socket; if you cannot find anything, then you need to get a qualified sparky in.
You are looking for burnt spots, cable damage or water.
(I'm a retired sparky)
Every socket in the house is secure, everything is unplugged. No interior changes so damage to wiring unlikely.
However now that you mention it, there's an outdoor plug socket on the same circuit in the back garden. Seems the only obvious explanation now.
Cheers lads
External sockets should be protected by an ELCB and rated IP65, NOT connected to the normal ring main.
If this is the cause, you need to get it altered.
Neither the patio light or the outdoor socket is working since the fuse tripped so I'm presuming they must be on the same circuit or they would still work.
I'll call the Sparky out cheers pal
OK, glad to be of help. Min spec for external is (I think) IP54 in a sheltered placement, but IP65 is much better protection and usually not much more expensive.
https://s30.postimg.org/pro634bcx/IMG_2761.jpg
No power going to it, (I know it usually works I use it to do lawn) basically a wire comes out of the wall to it and the patio light. No IP65 and from what I can tell (I'm no Sparky) it's just coming from a loop on an internal socket.
Think this is the problem?
Was like this when I moved in. Waiting for sparky to get back to me about coming out.
Loving the dodgy child guard in an external socket with missing door. That is rubbish.

I can't get the bloody thing out it's been in since I moved here I think it's glued lol.
#15
Loving the dodgy child guard in an external socket with missing door

THATs what it was, it was driving me crazy, I recognised the shape, but what it was just wouldnt come to me.

I can't get the bloody thing out it's been in since I moved here I think it's glued lol.

Sledge hammer.

Only problem is, that looks like a fairly modern house, IT may fall down before the socket gives up the ghost.
(Modern = less than 40 years old)

The things are a waste of time anyway, invented by some HSE idiot with no electrical knowledge, the live parts of the socket are covered by a plastic shield that ONLY moves out of the way when something is shoved into the earth pin socket first.
The chances of a young child managing both are about a billion to one, but breaking the cover and choking on it..........

Edited By: Gentle_Giant on Dec 08, 2016 16:54
#16
Gentle_Giant
Loving the dodgy child guard in an external socket with missing door
THATs what it was, it was driving me crazy, I recognised the shape, but what it was just wouldnt come to me.
I can't get the bloody thing out it's been in since I moved here I think it's glued lol.
Sledge hammer.
Only problem is, that looks like a fairly modern house, IT may fall down before the socket gives up the ghost.
(Modern = less than 40 years old)
The things are a waste of time anyway, invented by some HSE idiot with no electrical knowledge, the live parts of the socket are covered by a plastic shield that ONLY moves out of the way when something is shoved into the earth pin socket first.
The chances of a young child managing both are about a billion to one, but breaking the cover and choking on it..........

Thats not the psychology behind these covers. The are mostly there to hide the holes, any child will find it almost irresistible not to put something in a hole, especially one that is at a perfect height for them and something they see mum and dad do all the time. Had one customers whose young lad (2) felt the earth socket was a perfect place to have a pee.
#17
Argoj
Gentle_Giant
Loving the dodgy child guard in an external socket with missing door
THATs what it was, it was driving me crazy, I recognised the shape, but what it was just wouldnt come to me.
I can't get the bloody thing out it's been in since I moved here I think it's glued lol.
Sledge hammer.
Only problem is, that looks like a fairly modern house, IT may fall down before the socket gives up the ghost.
(Modern = less than 40 years old)
The things are a waste of time anyway, invented by some HSE idiot with no electrical knowledge, the live parts of the socket are covered by a plastic shield that ONLY moves out of the way when something is shoved into the earth pin socket first.
The chances of a young child managing both are about a billion to one, but breaking the cover and choking on it..........
Thats not the psychology behind these covers. The are mostly there to hide the holes, any child will find it almost irresistible not to put something in a hole, especially one that is at a perfect height for them and something they see mum and dad do all the time. Had one customers whose young lad (2) felt the earth socket was a perfect place to have a pee.

A cover isnt going to help if the socket is pee'd on!!!

Does he have a "Punk" hairdo now??

Ran a preschool nursery for over 25 years, and never had a child stick anything in a socket, it is a matter of educating them.
A bit like not eating slugs (had a girl who loved biting their heads off and eating them).
#18
Argoj
Gentle_Giant
Loving the dodgy child guard in an external socket with missing door
THATs what it was, it was driving me crazy, I recognised the shape, but what it was just wouldnt come to me.
I can't get the bloody thing out it's been in since I moved here I think it's glued lol.
Sledge hammer.
Only problem is, that looks like a fairly modern house, IT may fall down before the socket gives up the ghost.
(Modern = less than 40 years old)
The things are a waste of time anyway, invented by some HSE idiot with no electrical knowledge, the live parts of the socket are covered by a plastic shield that ONLY moves out of the way when something is shoved into the earth pin socket first.
The chances of a young child managing both are about a billion to one, but breaking the cover and choking on it..........
Thats not the psychology behind these covers. The are mostly there to hide the holes, any child will find it almost irresistible not to put something in a hole, especially one that is at a perfect height for them and something they see mum and dad do all the time. Had one customers whose young lad (2) felt the earth socket was a perfect place to have a pee.

Not so. The covers were developed outside the UK. Most countries have socket designs which do leave the terminals exposed and the plug in protectors were developed to protect those sockets.
The makers just used the same concept but with a UK plug shape.

The UK is I think unique in having a socket design with shutters that secure the terminals.
Technically it is probably illegal to use non-BS covers in a UK socket.
#19
Gentle_Giant
That looks like an ip enclosure of some type, but the fogging inside the clear plastic switch cover would suggest it is no longer water proof.
And yeah, it looks like it looks like a bodge job, probably the water has come in through the screw holes at the back, where it is fixed to the wall.
Externals like this MUST be protected with an ELCB (Earth Leakage Circuit Breaker), if the leccy company saw this they could cut off power to your house until it was made safe.
It's called an rcd (residual current device)actually and nobody's going to cut the power to the house even if anyone saw it.
#20
Gentle_Giant
AStonedRaichu
Gentle_Giant
Damp/water in one of the sockets, or a damaged cable.
Done any drilling or wallpaper stripping recently??
Kettle base unplugged??, Had mould growing in a base once, tracked enough current to trip the house
Look at, and feel around every socket; if you cannot find anything, then you need to get a qualified sparky in.
You are looking for burnt spots, cable damage or water.
(I'm a retired sparky)
Every socket in the house is secure, everything is unplugged. No interior changes so damage to wiring unlikely.
However now that you mention it, there's an outdoor plug socket on the same circuit in the back garden. Seems the only obvious explanation now.
Cheers lads
External sockets should be protected by an ELCB and rated IP65, NOT connected to the normal ring main.

If this is the cause, you need to get it altered.
Yes they should be protected by a 30ma rcd, but they don't have to be on a dedicated circuit. They can be on the same circuit as other sockets.
#21
Looks like the socket is fed via a flex unless the feed comes through the back. Have you traced the flex back to it's origin?.
#22
tubbs321
Gentle_Giant
AStonedRaichu
Gentle_Giant
Damp/water in one of the sockets, or a damaged cable.
Done any drilling or wallpaper stripping recently??
Kettle base unplugged??, Had mould growing in a base once, tracked enough current to trip the house
Look at, and feel around every socket; if you cannot find anything, then you need to get a qualified sparky in.
You are looking for burnt spots, cable damage or water.
(I'm a retired sparky)
Every socket in the house is secure, everything is unplugged. No interior changes so damage to wiring unlikely.
However now that you mention it, there's an outdoor plug socket on the same circuit in the back garden. Seems the only obvious explanation now.
Cheers lads
External sockets should be protected by an ELCB and rated IP65, NOT connected to the normal ring main.
If this is the cause, you need to get it altered.
Yes they should be protected by a 30ma rcd, but they don't have to be on a dedicated circuit. They can be on the same circuit as other sockets.

yeah, please add the word "directly" into the middle of that bit.

Lots have the ELCB built in to the socket, but as it is still outside, it is better to have the ELCB inside, so there are no live wires outside if a fault develops.
#23
The term elcb hasn't been used for quite a few years. Not sure what you mean by directly.

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