Electric under oven and separate hob - HotUKDeals
We use cookie files to improve site functionality and personalisation. By continuing to use HotUKDeals, you accept our cookie and privacy policy.
Get the HotUKDeals app free at Google Play

Search Error

An error occurred when searching, please try again!

Login / Sign UpSubmit

Electric under oven and separate hob

£0.00 @
Hello. We are replacing our freestanding electric oven with a under oven and separate hob when the new work top is put in. I know the oven will connect to the existing cooker switch but what about the… Read More
diamondnine Avatar
2w, 5d agoPosted 2 weeks, 5 days ago
Hello. We are replacing our freestanding electric oven with a under oven and separate hob when the new work top is put in. I know the oven will connect to the existing cooker switch but what about the hob? is this somehow connected to the cooker or does it need its own power supply? The cooker switch also has a 3 pin plug on it does it plug into this? Thanks for any answers
diamondnine Avatar
2w, 5d agoPosted 2 weeks, 5 days ago
Options

All Responses

(16) Jump to unreadPost an answer
Responses/page:
#1
depends on the size of own you buy as to if you can have it plugged in. think it's anything above 3kw has to be hard wired. the hob will have it's own connection as well.
#2
Depending on the current draw you might have to run another circuit in. My hob can potentially draw 10.8kW at full chat so I had to run another cable in direct from consumer unit. You might be lucky and it can be run off a 13amp socket (not the cooker switch one though, otherwise you'll have a trailing cable) You need to have a connection underneath the worktop.
#3
I recently had a new kitchen with a separate double oven. When the builder went to relocate the sockets etc he found that the people who built the house, 25 years ago, had just run a short spur of 6mm cable directly from a ring main of 2.5mm.
That meant that the builder had to run a separate 6mm cable from the fuse box in the garage, In the end he drilled through my garage wall into the hall ripped off the old coving ran it in the top corner around the wall drilled another hole back into the kitchen. As you can imagine it cost a lot.
You need to check the size of cable needed for the rating of the cooker.
#4
Hallsie
Depending on the current draw you might have to run another circuit in. My hob can potentially draw 10.8kW at full chat so I had to run another cable in direct from consumer unit. You might be lucky and it can be run off a 13amp socket (not the cooker switch one though, otherwise you'll have a trailing cable) You need to have a connection underneath the worktop.

The cooker switch has been relocated under the work top. I suppose its a trip to Currys to ask one of the Tech guys there what is required
#5
diamondnine
Hallsie
Depending on the current draw you might have to run another circuit in. My hob can potentially draw 10.8kW at full chat so I had to run another cable in direct from consumer unit. You might be lucky and it can be run off a 13amp socket (not the cooker switch one though, otherwise you'll have a trailing cable) You need to have a connection underneath the worktop.
The cooker switch has been relocated under the work top. I suppose its a trip to Currys to ask one of the Tech guys there what is required

You need to ask an electrician not a "tech guy"
#6
The hob will most likely draw more power than the oven, mine was 6.6kw so it was connected to the original oven ring. My oven was 3.5kw so I had the option of running off a 13 amp socket if I didn't run it a 280c+ degrees. I paid £220 for another run for the oven though. Some self clean ovens need to hit 400c degrees to clean though.
#7
Post the ratings of the hob & cooker. Remember, if the cable is not big enough, it potentially could cause a fire.
#8
As long as the MCB/Fuse etc is rated to the size of cable the only problem will be constant tripping/blowing. Cable will be fine.
#9
cookers need to be hard wired and not 3 pin plug so that will need to be replaced. make sure you get a different circuit for the cooker and hob otherwise they will overload when both are used. else make sure the electrician put in a thick enough cable to support the power of both running. You need a part P electrician as building regulations will need to be issued.
#10
An oven rated 3KW 13A can be plugged in to a standard ring circuit (it will be supplied with a 13A plug fitted). If the oven is rated greater than 3KW, typically 16A then it needs to be hard wired to it's own circuit (it will be supplied without a plug).

The hob has to be installed on the cooker circuit as this will be rated higher than the oven.

It is possible to put both the oven and a hob onto the same 'cooker' circuit - the 17th IEE Wiring Regs refer to something called Diversity - which accounts for the premise that full demand of the hob and oven will only occur for very short durations.

You will need to consult with an electrician for precise advice relevant to your appliances and your current installation (wire size, fuse rating).
#11
As its a cooking appliance you need to apply diversity.
Cooking appliance 10A of total load plus 30% of remainder. Add additional 5A if cooker point socket is fitted.
Power in watts = voltage (230) x current in amps
So if you hob is 5kw that would become 5000w
5000w/230v = 21.7 a

apply diversity = 21.7 - 10 = 11.7 / 30% = 3.51a add the 10a = 13.51amps

So your cable will most likely be adquate to run the hob but you need to check it with the electrician
also if you think its going to overload you can just plug the oven into the nearest socket outlet if its nearby or install a additional socket.
I have seen alot of kitchen fitters in the past just connecting the oven and hob into one but this is incorrect. You maybe able just change the cooker wire into 2 fused spurs and this may work to. Call a electrician in for a quote and take advice from them.

example
https://www.mybuilder.com/questions/v/26784/cooker-rating-and-wiring

Edited By: refix on Jun 09, 2017 20:02: Jun 09, 2017 20:02
#12
refix
As its a cooking appliance you need to apply diversity.
Cooking appliance 10A of total load plus 30% of remainder. Add additional 5A if cooker point socket is fitted.
Power in watts = voltage (230) x current in amps
So if you hob is 5kw that would become 5000w
5000w/230v = 21.7 a
apply diversity = 21.7 - 10 = 11.7 / 30% = 3.51a add the 10a = 13.51amps
So your cable will most likely be adquate to run the hob but you need to check it with the electrician
also if you think its going to overload you can just plug the oven into the nearest socket outlet if its nearby or install a additional socket.
I have seen alot of kitchen fitters in the past just connecting the oven and hob into one but this is incorrect. You maybe able just change the cooker wire into 2 fused spurs and this may work to. Call a electrician in for a quote and take advice from them.
examplehttps://www.mybuilder.com/questions/v/26784/cooker-rating-and-wiring
Looks like the oven and hob we WERE going to get are 4.4kw and 6kw. As it is impossible to run a new cable without ripping up floors etc i think this means we will have to get a new free standing one. Shame as we wanted the worktop to be continuous as it looks nicer. Thanks for the advice.
#13
refix
As its a cooking appliance you need to apply diversity.
Cooking appliance 10A of total load plus 30% of remainder. Add additional 5A if cooker point socket is fitted.
Power in watts = voltage (230) x current in amps
So if you hob is 5kw that would become 5000w
5000w/230v = 21.7 a
apply diversity = 21.7 - 10 = 11.7 / 30% = 3.51a add the 10a = 13.51amps
So your cable will most likely be adquate to run the hob but you need to check it with the electrician
also if you think its going to overload you can just plug the oven into the nearest socket outlet if its nearby or install a additional socket.
I have seen alot of kitchen fitters in the past just connecting the oven and hob into one but this is incorrect. You maybe able just change the cooker wire into 2 fused spurs and this may work to. Call a electrician in for a quote and take advice from them.
examplehttps://www.mybuilder.com/questions/v/26784/cooker-rating-and-wiring
I have now found a built in single oven that is 13a which i think will need a unit for it to go in. As this is a standard 3 pin plug, i assume the hob can be wired into the cooker switch and the rating of the fuse changed if required. Current fuse is 32a and cable looks like 10mm. Just want to know a bit before i get the electrician around.

Edited By: diamondnine on Jun 13, 2017 08:33: a
#14
diamondnine
refix
As its a cooking appliance you need to apply diversity.
Cooking appliance 10A of total load plus 30% of remainder. Add additional 5A if cooker point socket is fitted.
Power in watts = voltage (230) x current in amps
So if you hob is 5kw that would become 5000w
5000w/230v = 21.7 a
apply diversity = 21.7 - 10 = 11.7 / 30% = 3.51a add the 10a = 13.51amps
So your cable will most likely be adquate to run the hob but you need to check it with the electrician
also if you think its going to overload you can just plug the oven into the nearest socket outlet if its nearby or install a additional socket.
I have seen alot of kitchen fitters in the past just connecting the oven and hob into one but this is incorrect. You maybe able just change the cooker wire into 2 fused spurs and this may work to. Call a electrician in for a quote and take advice from them.
examplehttps://www.mybuilder.com/questions/v/26784/cooker-rating-and-wiring
Looks like the oven and hob we WERE going to get are 4.4kw and 6kw. As it is impossible to run a new cable without ripping up floors etc i think this means we will have to get a new free standing one. Shame as we wanted the worktop to be continuous as it looks nicer. Thanks for the advice.
So let's work it out.
6000w + 4400w = 10400w
10400/230= 45.2
45.2 - 10 = 35.2 / 30% = 10.56
10.56a + 10a = 20.56 amps
So you could use a wire thickness of between 4mm - 6mm
So if you have a 10mm cable this would be more than sufficient. You will just need to get the electrician to fit it into the connection plate. And leave the 32amp MCB in place.

Edited By: refix on Jun 13, 2017 12:53: refix
#15
Actually my mistake u could put the oven and hob into the same connections. But if either has a plug then it would need to be connected separately. So you be best of going for the 6kw and 4.4kw package. As it will be a easier install.
#16
So the theory is that you can safely fit both the hob and (choice of) oven onto the 32A MCB with the 10mm2 cable - so just down to the physical connection method.

You could choose either oven - if just the 13A oven you could always have the plug cut off - and have an electrician use this unit to connect it and the hob to the 10mm2 cable -

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/45amp-Easy-Fit-Cooker-Dual-Appliance-Outlet-Plate-for-Hob-Cooker-/172708559062?hash=item28363b78d6:g:ZEgAAOSwJkJWk~Np

(Note there is an identical one available for 14p cheaper on ebay but item this has a diagram showing how the unit is wired).

Post an Answer

You don't need an account to leave a response. Just enter your email address. We'll keep it private.

...OR log in with your social account

...OR comment using your social account

Thanks for your comment! Keep it up!
We just need to have a quick look and it will be live soon.
The community is happy to hear your opinion! Keep contributing!