Employer references - HotUKDeals
We use cookie files to improve site functionality and personalisation. By continuing to use HotUKDeals, you accept our cookie and privacy policy.
Get the HotUKDeals app free at Google Play

Search Error

An error occurred when searching, please try again!

Login / Sign UpSubmit

Employer references

£0.00 @
Someone I know has a very important job interview. If they are lucky enough to get the job it will be 'subject to satisfactory references'. We know for a fact that the previously employer has a 'no re… Read More
deeky Avatar
2y, 6m agoPosted 2 years, 6 months ago
Someone I know has a very important job interview. If they are lucky enough to get the job it will be 'subject to satisfactory references'. We know for a fact that the previously employer has a 'no references' policy. Although they do respond to requests and give one, it is just a basic 'We confirm that A. N. Other was employed by us between Jan 2001 and Jan 2014'.
I know that they are not obligated to provide a reference at all (I think) but I was just wondering if you think that such a basic (non) reference will diminish their chances of getting the job?

Thanks for your thoughts.
deeky Avatar
2y, 6m agoPosted 2 years, 6 months ago
Options

All Responses

(38) Jump to unreadPost an answer
Responses/page:
#1
Not if they are applying to a reasonably sized firm, this is standard practice in most industries.
#2
davewave
Not if they are applying to a reasonably sized firm, this is standard practice in most industries.

Yeah, they are both big, respectable firms.

And, if I'm right in believing that previous employers are not allowed to give poor references, it kinda makes the whole reference thing pointless.

Edited By: deeky on Jan 13, 2015 13:42: .
#3
I had a similar situation years ago. I just let the potential employer know the situation in advance. That way, one isolated reference wasnt so important.

The fact the person has an interview implies they are in with a decent shot. I would advise them to disclose it if and when they feel they have a rapport and the process is moving forward.

I let them know when it became obvious that the position was mine subject to "fit and proper" checks being done.

Edit: Forgot to mention, mine involved a 10 year "fit and proper" background check so maybe different. Hence why I stated 1 isolated reference.

Edited By: markq on Jan 13, 2015 13:43
#4
markq
I had a similar situation years ago. I just let the potential employer know the situation in advance. That way, one isolated reference wasnt so important.

The fact the person has an interview implies they are in with a decent shot. I would advise them to disclose it if and when they feel they have a rapport and the process is moving forward.

I let them know when it became obvious that the position was mine subject to "fit and proper" checks being done.

Thanks. This might be different though as there's only the one relevant referee. They only require references going back 3 years and they worked for the same one for 14 years. So the one reference I mention will be the lot.
#5
deeky
markq
I had a similar situation years ago. I just let the potential employer know the situation in advance. That way, one isolated reference wasnt so important.

The fact the person has an interview implies they are in with a decent shot. I would advise them to disclose it if and when they feel they have a rapport and the process is moving forward.

I let them know when it became obvious that the position was mine subject to "fit and proper" checks being done.

Thanks. This might be different though as there's only the one relevant referee. They only require references going back 3 years and they worked for the same one for 14 years. So the one reference I mention will be the lot.

Is there someone at the previous/current employers he/she could speak to in advance? That would be the best bet. Get someone that knows and likes them to do the reference (obviously assuming they are in a position to).

The fact they have worked for the same company for 14 years pretty much implies they should get a decent reference so long as they didnt get the Alan Sugar finger! :|

I was 26 when they had to do 10 year background checks.

Think I had to include fecking paper rounds! X)
(kidding, did have to include part time supermarket job whilst studying though)


Edited By: markq on Jan 13, 2015 13:50
#6
Not sure but would imagine that they can get an idea of type of person by application , experience, length of service, position held and responsibilities etc. Most ask for 2 previous employers' details. If confident enough they could add an additional non-related person to refer to . Shows the hirer they are happy with any enquiries made about themselves . Hope it helps.
#7
Why won't the company provide references though?

/Weird policy.
#8
Most companies have a no reference policy nowadays. Reason given for this is my last jobs has been its to do with data protection. I think most companies have similar practice's so doubt there will be an issue.
#9
markq
deeky
markq
I had a similar situation years ago. I just let the potential employer know the situation in advance. That way, one isolated reference wasnt so important.

The fact the person has an interview implies they are in with a decent shot. I would advise them to disclose it if and when they feel they have a rapport and the process is moving forward.

I let them know when it became obvious that the position was mine subject to "fit and proper" checks being done.

Thanks. This might be different though as there's only the one relevant referee. They only require references going back 3 years and they worked for the same one for 14 years. So the one reference I mention will be the lot.

Is there someone at the previous/current employers he/she could speak to in advance? That would be the best bet. Get someone that knows and likes them to do the reference (obviously assuming they are in a position to).

The fact they have worked for the same company for 14 years pretty much implies they should get a decent reference so long as they didnt get the Alan Sugar finger! :|

I was 26 when they had to do 10 year background checks.

Think I had to include fecking paper rounds! X)
(kidding, did have to include part time supermarket job whilst studying though)


There is someone but they are reluctant because it's against company policy for anyone to give personal references.
#10
Transformers
Why won't the company provide references though?

/Weird policy.

Laziness/cost saving I guess.

It is pretty poor though. A standard "they worked here from then to then" almost sounds suspicious like they are not divulging something.

You would assume a company would want to get decent references when vetting staff, so why not give them out themselves? Double standards.
#11
Sorry for hit and run, been called away. Be back soon.
#12
deeky
Sorry for hit and run, been called away. Be back soon.
A sorry isn't good enough deeky, I've called the police.
#13
deeky
markq
deeky
markq
I had a similar situation years ago. I just let the potential employer know the situation in advance. That way, one isolated reference wasnt so important.

The fact the person has an interview implies they are in with a decent shot. I would advise them to disclose it if and when they feel they have a rapport and the process is moving forward.

I let them know when it became obvious that the position was mine subject to "fit and proper" checks being done.

Thanks. This might be different though as there's only the one relevant referee. They only require references going back 3 years and they worked for the same one for 14 years. So the one reference I mention will be the lot.

Is there someone at the previous/current employers he/she could speak to in advance? That would be the best bet. Get someone that knows and likes them to do the reference (obviously assuming they are in a position to).

The fact they have worked for the same company for 14 years pretty much implies they should get a decent reference so long as they didnt get the Alan Sugar finger! :|

I was 26 when they had to do 10 year background checks.

Think I had to include fecking paper rounds! X)
(kidding, did have to include part time supermarket job whilst studying though)


There is someone but they are reluctant because it's against company policy for anyone to give personal references.

I didnt mean as a personal reference. I just meant the official employer's reference could be done by someone they have spoken to. Your friend could name the person and their position on the application.

What yorklass said was a good point as well. Personal references preferably from people who hold an important position themselves.

The best policy is always to cut off any potential problems before they arise.
#14
it takes up too much time & resources if you start going into details about whether the person was a good employee or reasons why they left etc.

for twenty quid i'll provide anyone with a fantastic reference & for an extra tenner i'll throw in a degree from the University of Pyongyang :D

Transformers
Why won't the company provide references though?
/Weird policy.
#15
I've never actually had my references checked by an employer, my current job required an enhanced disclosure (conviction information, spent or unspent, and any other information considered relevant by the police or other Government bodies)... and yet they did't even check my references.
#16
markq
Transformers
Why won't the company provide references though?

/Weird policy.

Laziness/cost saving I guess.

It is pretty poor though. A standard "they worked here from then to then" almost sounds suspicious like they are not divulging something.

You would assume a company would want to get decent references when vetting staff, so why not give them out themselves? Double standards.
It's stupid. If someone works for you, the least they deserve is a reference imho - as long as they've been a good employee I mean.

I think it's important to have two good references anyway OP, so I would see if your friend can get another employee there (a friend) who can give one, if possible.
#17
spaceinvader
I've never actually had my references checked by an employer, my current job required an enhanced disclosure (conviction information, spent or unspent, and any other information considered relevant by the police or other Government bodies)... and yet they did't even check my references.

Tut tut, McDonalds standards really have slipped! oO

:p
#18
DarkEnergy2012
it takes up too much time & resources if you start going into details about whether the person was a good employee or reasons why they left etc.

for twenty quid i'll provide anyone with a fantastic reference & for an extra tenner i'll throw in a degree from the University of Pyongyang :D

Transformers
Why won't the company provide references though?
/Weird policy.

Maybe when you learn to quote properly, until then jog on X)
#19
DarkEnergy2012
it takes up too much time & resources if you start going into details about whether the person was a good employee or reasons why they left etc.

for twenty quid i'll provide anyone with a fantastic reference & for an extra tenner i'll throw in a degree from the University of Pyongyang :D

Transformers
Why won't the company provide references though?
/Weird policy.
It only takes a few minutes though, you can even type up a reference for an e-mail and then copy and paste it for future employers. It's stupid and just lazy that a company doesn't do it.
#20
markq
spaceinvader
I've never actually had my references checked by an employer, my current job required an enhanced disclosure (conviction information, spent or unspent, and any other information considered relevant by the police or other Government bodies)... and yet they did't even check my references.

Tut tut, McDonalds standards really have slipped! oO

:p

They have indeed! I'm free to continue licking all the burger patties I like, I'll even put some free pubes on yours.
#21
I don't have any references, I can give ones from previous work mates but not get one from work itself its stupid because most places want a work one.
#22
I was in a similiar position a year ago, ended up relying on a personal reference and one bog standard professional one.
#23
You could tell the company that your friend is interviewing for about this no reference policy and see what they say.
#24
Transformers
It's stupid and just lazy that a company doesn't do it.

We live in a litigious age.
#25
ceres
Transformers
It's stupid and just lazy that a company doesn't do it.

We live in a litigious age.
What has this thread got to do with legal action?
#26
Transformers
ceres
Transformers
It's stupid and just lazy that a company doesn't do it.

We live in a litigious age.
What has this thread got to do with legal action?

A lot. One of the reasons employers are hesitant to give references is the fear of being sued over its content.

Thats what the linked article explains!
#27
markq
Transformers
ceres
Transformers
It's stupid and just lazy that a company doesn't do it.

We live in a litigious age.
What has this thread got to do with legal action?

A lot. One of the reasons employers are hesitant to give references is the fear of being sued over its content.

Thats what the linked article explains!
It's simple. If it's a good employee, give a good reference. If it's a bad employee, refuse to give one.

Then you're pretty much covered against 'legal action', even though it's unlikely anyone would pursue it in these scenarios. Too much hassle and expense.
#28
I was asked to give a reference by a company for a 'former employee' just had to fill the information online which they asked for, all I did was just tick the boxes, job done. Wouldn't have thought it would be too hard for the previous company to just do that to be fair. But if they absolutely refuse to acknowledge the request would the potential employers be willing to accept a character reference?
Maybe the person in question could ask a staff member for a character reference and provide that to the potential employers explaining that the company doesn't provide a reference and this is the next best thing i could provide.
Fingers crossed your friend gets the job :)
#30
deeky


There is someone but they are reluctant because it's against company policy for anyone to give personal references.

Ah just read this, maybe not then.
#31
Transformers
markq
Transformers
ceres
Transformers
It's stupid and just lazy that a company doesn't do it.

We live in a litigious age.
What has this thread got to do with legal action?

A lot. One of the reasons employers are hesitant to give references is the fear of being sued over its content.

Thats what the linked article explains!
It's simple. If it's a good employee, give a good reference. If it's a bad employee, refuse to give one.

Then you're pretty much covered against 'legal action', even though it's unlikely anyone would pursue it in these scenarios. Too much hassle and expense.

I didnt say I agreed with it ;)

Also, unfortunately, there can be petty reasons why they wont. It can be jealousy/envy/resentment.

Some people dont like it when they are asked to give a reference for someone who was under them, for a job far better than the one they are still in! X)
(thats pretty much the instance I was referring to in one of my earlier posts, an isolated reference from someone petty who didnt like the fact I had moved on to far better things)
#32
Thanks for your input everyone. My 'friend' has got the details of one former colleague who would be willing to give a personal character reference if really necessary. I'll advise my friend to explain the situation and to offer the extra details if required. Hopefully they'll say don't worry, they only need a reference to confirm previous employment details.
#33
Transformers
What has this thread got to do with legal action?
It's simple. If it's a good employee, give a good reference. If it's a bad employee, refuse to give one.

Then you're pretty much covered against 'legal action', even though it's unlikely anyone would pursue it in these scenarios. Too much hassle and expense.

Good reference, bad reference is in the eye of the writer/reader. It's not black and white. To be confident of avoiding claims, references would have to be so anodyne as to be useless. Oh wait, a simple statement of employment dates.......

Edited By: ceres on Jan 13, 2015 15:28
#34
I work in the care industry, and we get this all the time. We are required to obtain two satisfactory references BEFORE we apply for a criminal records check, and the references usually come back with employment dates only. It makes the obtaining of references pointless. I understand that giving a crap reference shouldn't be allowed, but there should be a law that states if somebody CAN do a reference, then they SHOULD, and they should be allowed to be honest when doing so. There's a difference between giving a poor reference (high sickness, poor flexibility, poor timekeeping, etc.) and giving a crap reference.
#35
wouldn't worry about it. these things tend to get themselves sorted out one way or another. I've never had a problem with references even when I was put on disciplinary notice then got made redundant.
banned#36
I used to work in HR, this reference is standard these days, and will almost certainly be fine
#37
UnderDepth
I used to work in HR, this reference is standard these days, and will almost certainly be fine

Thanks for the reassurance :)
#38
it's a bit disgraceful that they have a blanket policy against saying a good word about a loyal servant

they're still £300 better off than if they did unpaid work for this smug @*$£ and wanted a reference


the whole 'can't give a bad reference' thing is a fallacy. the only problem is it opens you up to libel if the person contests it. normally references are supposed to be confidential, but I saw mine and lots of my colleagues' when i was in a role that gave me access to them (and a lot of sensitive documents I really had no reason to see).
for my current role, which is a pretty serious one that you'd expect all sorts of background checks, all they cared about in references was reliability - that you weren't late and didn't go sick often

Post an Answer

You don't need an account to leave a response. Just enter your email address. We'll keep it private.

...OR log in with your social account

...OR comment using your social account

Thanks for your comment! Keep it up!
We just need to have a quick look and it will be live soon.
The community is happy to hear your opinion! Keep contributing!