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English Grammar

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I don't know who to ask, can I ask some homework here? My child has homework on 'The Gingerbread Man', rewriting sentences with capital letters and punctuations. Now which is correct? Run, run, as f… Read More
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8m, 2w agoPosted 8 months, 2 weeks ago
I don't know who to ask, can I ask some homework here?
My child has homework on 'The Gingerbread Man', rewriting sentences with capital letters and punctuations. Now which is correct?
Run, run, as fast as you can. You can't catch me, I'm the gingerbread man!
or
Run, run, as fast as you can. You can't catch me, I'm the Gingerbread Man!
Should the 'gingerbread man' be capitalised? And why?
Thank you.
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8m, 2w agoPosted 8 months, 2 weeks ago
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#1
Capitalised as "the" means its a proper name , "A gingerbread man " would not be capitalised as it refers to any gingerbread man .
#2
Ahhh, I knew this at one stage - I used this brain training app and got the answer wrong because of this. (not the same question but whether capitals should be used or not).

I think it should be capitals as it's the characters name, but not 100% sure.
#3
I would say Gingerbread man as it is a name
#4
choice4
I would say Gingerbread man as it is a name

Then surely it should be Gingerbread Man :{
#5
Proper nouns have capital letters common nouns don't. In this case Gingerbread Man is being used as his name and as such has capital letters. You have used a definite article (the) before Gingerbread Man therefore it refers to a specific gingerbread man and as such Gingerbread Man is being used as a proper noun and should be capitalised. If you had used an indefinite article such as a before gingerbread man then it would not have capital letters as it would be a common noun.
#6
How about this
Run, run as fast as you can!
You can't catch me. I'm the Gingerbread Man!
#7
Thank you so much all for your answers. I think this is quite conclusive that it should be 'Gingerbread Man'. I am so glad that there is this site - for all the great deals and even for homeworks. Thanks a million. X)
#8
fish323
Proper nouns have capital letters common nouns don't. In this case Gingerbread Man is being used as his name and as such has capital letters. You have used a definite article (the) before Gingerbread Man therefore it refers to a specific gingerbread man and as such Gingerbread Man is being used as a proper noun and should be capitalised. If you had used an indefinite article such as a before gingerbread man then it would not have capital letters as it would be a common noun.
So just to challenge your theory
Run, run, as fast as you can. You can't catch me, I'm the Fat Boy down the street!

Sorry but I'd go with lower case as it's not a name/identity it's a description
#9
If the person in question is using it as a name rather than a description -as he clearly is in this occasion- then it should be capitalised.
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/10008621-run_fat_boy_run/
philphil61
fish323
Proper nouns have capital letters common nouns don't. In this case Gingerbread Man is being used as his name and as such has capital letters. You have used a definite article (the) before Gingerbread Man therefore it refers to a specific gingerbread man and as such Gingerbread Man is being used as a proper noun and should be capitalised. If you had used an indefinite article such as a before gingerbread man then it would not have capital letters as it would be a common noun.
So just to challenge your theory
Run, run, as fast as you can. You can't catch me, I'm the Fat Boy down the street!
Sorry but I'd go with lower case as it's not a name/identity it's a description
banned#10
the second opinion
#11
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Gingerbread_Man
The Gingerbread Man (also known as The Gingerbread Boy or The Gingerbread Runner) is a fairy tale about a gingerbread man's escape from various pursuers and his eventual demise between the jaws of a fox. The story is variety of the class of folk tales about runaway food, which are classified in the Aarne–Thompson classification system of traditional folktales as AT 2025: The Fleeing Pancake.[1][2] A gingerbread boy as hero is a uniquely American contribution to the tale type.[1]
Notice how the capitalisation changes as they switch from definite to indefinite articles.

philphil61
fish323
Proper nouns have capital letters common nouns don't. In this case Gingerbread Man is being used as his name and as such has capital letters. You have used a definite article (the) before Gingerbread Man therefore it refers to a specific gingerbread man and as such Gingerbread Man is being used as a proper noun and should be capitalised. If you had used an indefinite article such as a before gingerbread man then it would not have capital letters as it would be a common noun.
So just to challenge your theory
Run, run, as fast as you can. You can't catch me, I'm the Fat Boy down the street!
Sorry but I'd go with lower case as it's not a name/identity it's a description
#12
fish323
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Gingerbread_Man
The Gingerbread Man (also known as The Gingerbread Boy or The Gingerbread Runner) is a fairy tale about a gingerbread man's escape from various pursuers and his eventual demise between the jaws of a fox. The story is variety of the class of folk tales about runaway food, which are classified in the Aarne–Thompson classification system of traditional folktales as AT 2025: The Fleeing Pancake.[1][2] A gingerbread boy as hero is a uniquely American contribution to the tale type.[1]
Notice how the capitalisation changes as they switch from definite to indefinite articles.
philphil61
fish323
Proper nouns have capital letters common nouns don't. In this case Gingerbread Man is being used as his name and as such has capital letters. You have used a definite article (the) before Gingerbread Man therefore it refers to a specific gingerbread man and as such Gingerbread Man is being used as a proper noun and should be capitalised. If you had used an indefinite article such as a before gingerbread man then it would not have capital letters as it would be a common noun.
So just to challenge your theory
Run, run, as fast as you can. You can't catch me, I'm the Fat Boy down the street!
Sorry but I'd go with lower case as it's not a name/identity it's a description

The capitalisation we see from your excerpt is because 'The Gingerbread Man' is the title of the fairy tale.

Just sayin'


Edited By: RossD89 on Oct 11, 2016 14:17
#13
Look a few paragraphs down.
Variations on the 1875 story[edit]
The Gingerbread Man remains a common subject for American children's literature into the 21st century. The retellings often omit the original ending ("I'm quarter gone...I'm half gone...I'm three-quarters gone...I'm all gone!")[1] and make other changes. In some variations, the fox feigns indifference to the edible man. The cookie then relaxes his guard and the fox snatches and devours him. In other versions, the Gingerbread Man halts in his flight at a riverbank, and after accepting the fox's offer as a ferry, he finds himself eaten mid-stream.
In some retellings, the Gingerbread Man taunts his pursuers with the famous line:
Run, run as fast as you can!
You can't catch me. I'm the Gingerbread Man!
RossD89
fish323
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Gingerbread_Man
The Gingerbread Man (also known as The Gingerbread Boy or The Gingerbread Runner) is a fairy tale about a gingerbread man's escape from various pursuers and his eventual demise between the jaws of a fox. The story is variety of the class of folk tales about runaway food, which are classified in the Aarne–Thompson classification system of traditional folktales as AT 2025: The Fleeing Pancake.[1][2] A gingerbread boy as hero is a uniquely American contribution to the tale type.[1]
Notice how the capitalisation changes as they switch from definite to indefinite articles.
philphil61
fish323
Proper nouns have capital letters common nouns don't. In this case Gingerbread Man is being used as his name and as such has capital letters. You have used a definite article (the) before Gingerbread Man therefore it refers to a specific gingerbread man and as such Gingerbread Man is being used as a proper noun and should be capitalised. If you had used an indefinite article such as a before gingerbread man then it would not have capital letters as it would be a common noun.
So just to challenge your theory
Run, run, as fast as you can. You can't catch me, I'm the Fat Boy down the street!
Sorry but I'd go with lower case as it's not a name/identity it's a description
The capitalisation we see from your excerpt is because 'The Gingerbread Man' is the title of the fairy tale.
Just sayin'
#14
Confuse the teachers.

Run, run, as fast as you can!

Shotgun in hand, it's the Gingerbread Man!
#15
rogparki
Capitalised as "the" means its a proper name , "A gingerbread man " would not be capitalised as it refers to any gingerbread man .

It gets capitalised if it's a name, not capitalised if it's a description. That depends on context and in this case you could put forward an argument either way. Given that the character isn't known as anything else I'd probably consider it a name and capitalise it.

The presence of absence of 'the' isn't a great guide, you can come up with loads of counter examples either way, e.g. "I'm the manager".
#16
I'm going with no capitals. If it was his name, it would read either "I'm The Gingerbread Man," or "I'm Gingerbread Man". I would say that "gingerbread man" in this case is his description. You would never say "I'm the Joe Bloggs" for example, but you might say "I'm the plumber".
#17
My copy of The Classic Fairytale Collection from M&S, disagrees with consensus.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v259/jules_th/IMAG1311.jpg
#18
All you have to do now is make sure your child understands the correct answer, or the teacher will be setting work for them on an incorrect knowledge basis, and you will end up having to do more and more of their homework.

Which is all well and good; but they wont let you sit in during the GCSEs.
#19
Ré book answer; I have a childrens book with a five tentacled octopus (and an "educational" toy with 6); is this correct?? I have another with a reindeer fawn labelled "unicorn".

Having said that, Pentapus and Hexapuss were firm favourites with my daughter.
#20
Don't start me off on children's books and TV programmes; turtles walking about the land and tortoises swimming about in the sea. Even the BBC don't seem to know the difference.

Or the colours of the rainbow (of which pink, is not one).
#21
BigOrkWaaagh
I'm going with no capitals. If it was his name, it would read either "I'm The Gingerbread Man," or "I'm Gingerbread Man". I would say that "gingerbread man" in this case is his description. You would never say "I'm the Joe Bloggs" for example, but you might say "I'm the plumber".

Are you really the Joe Bloggs?

Oh and by the way, I fancy the Seychelles for my holidays this year.
#22
EndlessWaves
BigOrkWaaagh
I'm going with no capitals. If it was his name, it would read either "I'm The Gingerbread Man," or "I'm Gingerbread Man". I would say that "gingerbread man" in this case is his description. You would never say "I'm the Joe Bloggs" for example, but you might say "I'm the plumber".
Are you really the Joe Bloggs?
Oh and by the way, I fancy the Seychelles for my holidays this year.

Seychelles.
#23
HotDealAlert
I don't know who to ask, can I ask some homework here?

My child has homework on 'The Gingerbread Man', rewriting sentences with capital letters and punctuations. Now which is correct?

Run, run, as fast as you can. You can't catch me, I'm the gingerbread man!
or
Run, run, as fast as you can. You can't catch me, I'm the Gingerbread Man!

Should the 'gingerbread man' be capitalised? And why?
Thank you.

I believe you have gained an answer to your original query.

However, the first sentence is "Run, run as fast as you can!".

Note the inclusion of only one comma.

There are also three sentences in total:

"Run, run as fast as you can!", "You can't catch me.", and "I'm the Gingerbread Man!".

Again, please note there is a not a comma between "me" & "I'm". These are two separate sentences.
#24
fanpages

There are also three sentences in total:
"Run, run as fast as you can!", "You can't catch me.", and "I'm the Gingerbread Man!".
Again, please note there is a not a comma between "me" & "I'm". These are two separate sentences.

Arguably. On the other hand you could argue that the reason they can't catch him is because he's the gingerbread man, in which case it's part of the same sentence. In the book I posted a shot of, it's hyphenated!
#25
Jules_HT
Arguably. On the other hand you could argue that the reason they can't catch him is because he's the gingerbread man, in which case it's part of the same sentence. In the book I posted a shot of, it's hyphenated!

Within the original source text (where the character is first mentioned) there are three separate sentences.
#26
fanpages
Jules_HT
Arguably. On the other hand you could argue that the reason they can't catch him is because he's the gingerbread man, in which case it's part of the same sentence. In the book I posted a shot of, it's hyphenated!
Within the original source text (where the character is first mentioned) there are three separate sentences.

Am I missing something? The original options given were

"Run, run, as fast as you can. You can't catch me, I'm the gingerbread man!"
or
"Run, run, as fast as you can. You can't catch me, I'm the Gingerbread Man!"

Both of which have two.
#27
Jules_HT
Am I missing something? The original options given... Both of which have two.

I was referring to the original text where the additional taunt (being discussed here) was first written (not in the opening post of this thread).

I can see the "downvoters" are out in force again.

This will be my last comment here.
#28
Oh my god... the more I read, the more I seems to know - but in fact, I am more confused......If I cannot be certain, how can I teach my child?
Having said that, once again, thank you all. I think I will go with capitals this time and see what the teacher may say...;)
#29
I would think that all these "discussions" might be more relevant for an older child but assuming this is a younger child and the homework is about capital letters I would think that capitals would be more appropriate.
#30
I initially thought it should be capitalised as it's his name however having read various comments and thought a bit further, I think it should not be capitalised. Gingerbread man is not his name but a description, in my revised opinion.


Edited By: dave80 on Oct 11, 2016 23:53
#31
sofiasar
the second opinion
Helpful! oO
#32
fanpages
Jules_HT
Am I missing something? The original options given... Both of which have two.
I was referring to the original text where the additional taunt (being discussed here) was first written (not in the opening post of this thread).
I can see the "downvoters" are out in force again.
This will be my last comment here.

Does someone having a perfectly reasonable but alternative view to your own upset you so much that insults, and throwing your proverbial toys out of the pram and storming off, are your only response?

@ the OP, you've been given a screen shot of the actual book, which supports the argument that The Gingerbread Man is not his formal name/a proper noun, it is a description of him (and is as such not capitalised). Up to you whether you want to ignore that or go with it. I would go with it (and will if my 5 yr old gets asked similar).

I'd ignore the comma vs. full stop issue and stick with the traditional "two sentence" structure.

You had it right in your first option in your opening post, in my view:

"Run, run, as fast as you can. You can't catch me, I'm the gingerbread man!"

Edited By: Jules_HT on Oct 12, 2016 08:35
#33
Jules_HT
fanpages
Jules_HT
Am I missing something? The original options given... Both of which have two.
I was referring to the original text where the additional taunt (being discussed here) was first written (not in the opening post of this thread).
I can see the "downvoters" are out in force again.
This will be my last comment here.
Does someone having a perfectly reasonable but alternative view to your own upset you so much that insults, and throwing your proverbial toys out of the pram and storming off, are your only response?
@ the OP, you've been given a screen shot of the actual book, which supports the argument that The Gingerbread Man is not his formal name/a proper noun, it is a description of him (and is as such not capitalised). Up to you whether you want to ignore that or go with it. I would go with it (and will if my 5 yr old gets asked similar).
I'd ignore the comma vs. full stop issue and stick with the traditional "two sentence" structure.
You had it right in your first option in your opening post, in my view:
"Run, run, as fast as you can. You can't catch me, I'm the gingerbread man!"
Agreed. First option is correct.
#34
It should be Gingerbread Person or Bread Person as "Ginger" is an offensive term.
Then it would be politically correct and not sexist or offensive to anyone.
:p
#35
Well, thank you all so much for responding. Paper came back, the teacher said it should be Ginigerbread Man as it is more or less used as a name, a proper noun. But I guess, like so many of you mention, it could well be small letter...... At least I now know my DD should use capital for this in THIS school. :)
#36
archer1204
How about this
Run, run as fast as you can!
You can't catch me. I'm the Gingerbread Man!

sofiasar
the second opinion

fancy seeing you two on a thread about grammar and punctuation... giving opinions oO

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