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Help changing from pre payment gas & electric meter

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Hi, I currently have pre payment gas and electric meters, and have always had so. I've been meaning to switch for a while due to the savings, but have never gotten around to it, but im just a bit bog… Read More
feilong123 Avatar
2y, 9m agoPosted 2 years, 9 months ago
Hi,
I currently have pre payment gas and electric meters, and have always had so. I've been meaning to switch for a while due to the savings, but have never gotten around to it, but im just a bit boggled by it all. Do I have to ask my landlord first? Can I just switch to direct debit and save? And what are the current cheapest providers. Im currently with british gas for gas & npower for electric. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you
feilong123 Avatar
2y, 9m agoPosted 2 years, 9 months ago
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#1
As far as I'm aware, it is your current provider who will change the type of meter-then they will automatically put you on their standard tarrif with no fixed contract length-you are then free to shop around and change provider. I don't think that you can change the type of meter without the landlord's consent, but I may be mistaken.
#2
Yes you will need your landlords consent
Southern electric wanted £54 per meter to change mine so I switched to british gas who did them for free plus £10 nectar points for switching looks like Eon do it for free subject to a credit check
#3
The supply of energy is a contract between the supplier and you. The meters belong to the energy companies and not the landlord. The landlord has no legal hold over what type of meters, nor which supplier(s) are used at the premises unless they pay the energy bills directly.

If you want to switch onto credit meters, you can talk to your current supplier and see what deal they are willing to offer. Alternatively (because it can become quite expensive to switch) look at the energy companies that will do this for free. EDF, for instance, will install credit meters free of charge after 3 months, providing you don't fall into debt. Of course, once you have the meters installed, you can immediately switch provider again. Don't be shy of switching provider every couple of months if it is to your advantage.

Finally - and most importantly I stress again, the landlord has absolutely no say what-so-ever in what type of meters are at the property unless the payment contract is between them and the energy supplier.
#4
dlee1
The supply of energy is a contract between the supplier and you. The meters belong to the energy companies and not the landlord. The landlord has no legal hold over what type of meters, nor which supplier(s) are used at the premises unless they pay the energy bills directly.

If you want to switch onto credit meters, you can talk to your current supplier and see what deal they are willing to offer. Alternatively (because it can become quite expensive to switch) look at the energy companies that will do this for free. EDF, for instance, will install credit meters free of charge after 3 months, providing you don't fall into debt. Of course, once you have the meters installed, you can immediately switch provider again. Don't be shy of switching provider every couple of months if it is to your advantage.

Finally - and most importantly I stress again, the landlord has absolutely no say what-so-ever in what type of meters are at the property unless the payment contract is between them and the energy supplier.
Looks like you could be right my landlord at my last address told me I couldn't change supplier and the one before that I couldn't change meters
Check your tenancy agreement
Not informing them of any changes would be folly
#5
always go to http://www.uswitch.com for the best deals hunni thats how i have swapped each year and you dont need to ask your landlord either you pay the bill not him x

some companies charge for taking prepayments out and some dont so just keep that in mind

good luck
#6
Not quite sure why I have received 2 negative votes for giving the correct information. But just to reiterate, an energy contract is between two parties. The supplier and the bill payer. If you pay the bill for the energy at a property, the landlord has nothing to do with who the supplier is or what the meter type used is.

If you have any doubts about this, I suggest you read the OFGEM official Tenancy Rights fact sheet - available in PDF format here: https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/ofgem-publications/83161/tenancyrightsfactsheetenglishweb.pdf
#7
thewongwing101
dlee1
The supply of energy is a contract between the supplier and you. The meters belong to the energy companies and not the landlord. The landlord has no legal hold over what type of meters, nor which supplier(s) are used at the premises unless they pay the energy bills directly.

If you want to switch onto credit meters, you can talk to your current supplier and see what deal they are willing to offer. Alternatively (because it can become quite expensive to switch) look at the energy companies that will do this for free. EDF, for instance, will install credit meters free of charge after 3 months, providing you don't fall into debt. Of course, once you have the meters installed, you can immediately switch provider again. Don't be shy of switching provider every couple of months if it is to your advantage.

Finally - and most importantly I stress again, the landlord has absolutely no say what-so-ever in what type of meters are at the property unless the payment contract is between them and the energy supplier.
Looks like you could be right my landlord at my last address told me I couldn't change supplier and the one before that I couldn't change meters
Check your tenancy agreement
Not informing them of any changes would be folly

Indeed - I had a landlord try to pull that one on me once. Far too many landlords think that when it comes to a rental property, they can dictate every little detail. What they fail to realise is that paying for rental gives you a significant amount of rights, and tenancy contracts - like any kind of contract, are forbidden from removing your statutory rights. Any such removal is null and void in the contract, even if you have signed it. Basic contract law.

A landlord may want to stipulate that you return the energy supply to its original state before you leave, but they have no legal ability to prevent you switching supplier, meter type, payment type. Unless - and only if - they are responsible for paying the bill to the energy supplier.

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