Hi everyone, I have an xbox one s and am now looking for a 4k tv but I don't know how to work out which 4k tvs showing up on here have the HDR 10 that the xbox uses for game enhancements, any help would be greatly appreciated. - HotUKDeals
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Hi everyone, I have an xbox one s and am now looking for a 4k tv but I don't know how to work out which 4k tvs showing up on here have the HDR 10 that the xbox uses for game enhancements, any help would be greatly appreciated.

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As the questions says I don't know how to work out which 4k tvs have HDR 10. Read More
daviesno1 Avatar
5d, 14h agoPosted 5 days, 14 hours ago
As the questions says I don't know how to work out which 4k tvs have HDR 10.
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daviesno1 Avatar
5d, 14h agoPosted 5 days, 14 hours ago
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#1
Any of the Samsung SUHD quantum dot KS series screens are incredible and worth every penny, second hand ks7000 screens are great value and brilliant performance (just try get one people are genuinely getting rid of, not a ex display/refurb, ks9500 are great new screens
#2
If HDR is your main concern, the Sony xd93 series is probably the best for.
#3
You are looking for a 10 bit panel HDR Tv. Google that and it'll show you
#4
I would highly recommend the Samsung ks8000 if your looking for a flat panel tv.
#6
HDR10 is a content format, and the most widespread one. Any TV that advertises HDR has the ability to read HDR10 content. However, the ability to read the content isn't the same as the ability to display it. Nothing right now supports the full range of pictures that HDR10 can record and while top of the range TVs do a good job, the capability declines as you go down the range. Most of the cheap 'HDR' TVs have no extra hardware for HDR at all.

Dannyrobbo
You are looking for a 10 bit panel HDR Tv. Google that and it'll show you

There's little difference between an 8-bit panel and a 10-bit panel. The big differences in HDR hardware are all in the backlight and electronics, not the LCD matrix itself. The 10-bit requirement is that the TV accepts a 10-bit signal as that's the format most HDR content uses. Everything does these days though, that was mostly a concern a year or two ago.

Generally Samsung's KS7000-KS9000 series are seen as good entry level 2016 options for some HDR display ability as they're the cheapest TVs to implement local dimming to a reasonable standard, which means they can display an actual improved brightness range. The XD93 is a good option too, although slightly more money.

The UH770 and other LG higher end LCDs do have local dimming but it's a poor implementation and some reviews recommend turning it off. The UH770 also doesn't have the same colour space as most HDR TVs or the next model up (UH850). I wouldn't buy it if HDR is a priority or you'll be disappointed but it might be an acceptable compromise if it appeals for other reasons.
#7
EndlessWaves
HDR10 is a content format, and the most widespread one. Any TV that advertises HDR has the ability to read HDR10 content. However, the ability to read the content isn't the same as the ability to display it. Nothing right now supports the full range of pictures that HDR10 can record and while top of the range TVs do a good job, the capability declines as you go down the range. Most of the cheap 'HDR' TVs have no extra hardware for HDR at all.
Dannyrobbo
You are looking for a 10 bit panel HDR Tv. Google that and it'll show you
There's little difference between an 8-bit panel and a 10-bit panel. The big differences in HDR hardware are all in the backlight and electronics, not the LCD matrix itself. The 10-bit requirement is that the TV accepts a 10-bit signal as that's the format most HDR content uses. Everything does these days though, that was mostly a concern a year or two ago.
Generally Samsung's KS7000-KS9000 series are seen as good entry level 2016 options for some HDR display ability as they're the cheapest TVs to implement local dimming to a reasonable standard, which means they can display an actual improved brightness range. The XD93 is a good option too, although slightly more money.
The UH770 and other LG higher end LCDs do have local dimming but it's a poor implementation and some reviews recommend turning it off. The UH770 also doesn't have the same colour space as most HDR TVs or the next model up (UH850). I wouldn't buy it if HDR is a priority or you'll be disappointed but it might be an acceptable compromise if it appeals for other reasons.
this was a great explanation, thanks. What are the main differences between the ks7,8, & 9000?
#8
umirza85
EndlessWaves
HDR10 is a content format, and the most widespread one. Any TV that advertises HDR has the ability to read HDR10 content. However, the ability to read the content isn't the same as the ability to display it. Nothing right now supports the full range of pictures that HDR10 can record and while top of the range TVs do a good job, the capability declines as you go down the range. Most of the cheap 'HDR' TVs have no extra hardware for HDR at all.
Dannyrobbo
You are looking for a 10 bit panel HDR Tv. Google that and it'll show you
There's little difference between an 8-bit panel and a 10-bit panel. The big differences in HDR hardware are all in the backlight and electronics, not the LCD matrix itself. The 10-bit requirement is that the TV accepts a 10-bit signal as that's the format most HDR content uses. Everything does these days though, that was mostly a concern a year or two ago.
Generally Samsung's KS7000-KS9000 series are seen as good entry level 2016 options for some HDR display ability as they're the cheapest TVs to implement local dimming to a reasonable standard, which means they can display an actual improved brightness range. The XD93 is a good option too, although slightly more money.
The UH770 and other LG higher end LCDs do have local dimming but it's a poor implementation and some reviews recommend turning it off. The UH770 also doesn't have the same colour space as most HDR TVs or the next model up (UH850). I wouldn't buy it if HDR is a priority or you'll be disappointed but it might be an acceptable compromise if it appeals for other reasons.
this was a great explanation, thanks. What are the main differences between the ks7,8, & 9000?

With the exception of the KS9500 they all seem to be very similar models. I haven't looked into them in detail but as far as I understand it the KS7500 and KS9000 are curved versions of the KS7000 and KS8000 respectively. The KS8000/KS9000 add various minor improvements like better speakers and improved motion handling over the KS7000/KS7500.

The KS9500 has a completely different backlight and is better, larger and more expensive. The verdicts on the 2017 models aren't in yet, but it was generally considered the second best HDR TV of the 2016 range after the Sony ZD9.
#9
EndlessWaves
umirza85
EndlessWaves
HDR10 is a content format, and the most widespread one. Any TV that advertises HDR has the ability to read HDR10 content. However, the ability to read the content isn't the same as the ability to display it. Nothing right now supports the full range of pictures that HDR10 can record and while top of the range TVs do a good job, the capability declines as you go down the range. Most of the cheap 'HDR' TVs have no extra hardware for HDR at all.
Dannyrobbo
You are looking for a 10 bit panel HDR Tv. Google that and it'll show you
There's little difference between an 8-bit panel and a 10-bit panel. The big differences in HDR hardware are all in the backlight and electronics, not the LCD matrix itself. The 10-bit requirement is that the TV accepts a 10-bit signal as that's the format most HDR content uses. Everything does these days though, that was mostly a concern a year or two ago.
Generally Samsung's KS7000-KS9000 series are seen as good entry level 2016 options for some HDR display ability as they're the cheapest TVs to implement local dimming to a reasonable standard, which means they can display an actual improved brightness range. The XD93 is a good option too, although slightly more money.
The UH770 and other LG higher end LCDs do have local dimming but it's a poor implementation and some reviews recommend turning it off. The UH770 also doesn't have the same colour space as most HDR TVs or the next model up (UH850). I wouldn't buy it if HDR is a priority or you'll be disappointed but it might be an acceptable compromise if it appeals for other reasons.
this was a great explanation, thanks. What are the main differences between the ks7,8, & 9000?
With the exception of the KS9500 they all seem to be very similar models. I haven't looked into them in detail but as far as I understand it the KS7500 and KS9000 are curved versions of the KS7000 and KS8000 respectively. The KS8000/KS9000 add various minor improvements like better speakers and improved motion handling over the KS7000/KS7500.
The KS9500 has a completely different backlight and is better, larger and more expensive. The verdicts on the 2017 models aren't in yet, but it was generally considered the second best HDR TV of the 2016 range after the Sony ZD9.
Thanks for detailing that out. Makes it much easier now that I know half the screens are curved (which I can rule out). If I'm spending around £1200-1300 on a 65", wonder if there are and 70-75" in that price range that are decent?
#10
You can tell the difference between 8 and 10 bit easily but the question is if you really care. For me I'd tend to buy the better models that include 10 bit as they are generally higher spec anyway, HDR is much better with the large amount of colours from the 10 bit display. If your source can output it I would make sure my tv can display it, if you are on more of a budget rein it back to 8 bit. I bought a 10 bit LG with local dimming and it looks awesome!!
#11
I have only recently bought my xbox one s but as far as I am aware it only supports 10 bit HDR which is then the issue, I myself am not fussed between 8 and 10 bit but apparently with the xbox it's 10 bit or nothing.
#12
daviesno1
I have only recently bought my xbox one s but as far as I am aware it only supports 10 bit HDR which is then the issue, I myself am not fussed between 8 and 10 bit but apparently with the xbox it's 10 bit or nothing.

I just picked 10 but for future proofing. You buy a shiny new tv with new features such as HDR and use dated technology to display it.
#13
What I mean is, from what I've read online the xbox one s only shows any HDR benefit with HDR 10 meaning if the tv is HDR 8 for example then the xbox doesn't use it.
#14
EndlessWaves
HDR10 is a content format, and the most widespread one. Any TV that advertises HDR has the ability to read HDR10 content. However, the ability to read the content isn't the same as the ability to display it. Nothing right now supports the full range of pictures that HDR10 can record and while top of the range TVs do a good job, the capability declines as you go down the range. Most of the cheap 'HDR' TVs have no extra hardware for HDR at all.
Dannyrobbo
You are looking for a 10 bit panel HDR Tv. Google that and it'll show you
There's little difference between an 8-bit panel and a 10-bit panel. The big differences in HDR hardware are all in the backlight and electronics, not the LCD matrix itself. The 10-bit requirement is that the TV accepts a 10-bit signal as that's the format most HDR content uses. Everything does these days though, that was mostly a concern a year or two ago.
Generally Samsung's KS7000-KS9000 series are seen as good entry level 2016 options for some HDR display ability as they're the cheapest TVs to implement local dimming to a reasonable standard, which means they can display an actual improved brightness range. The XD93 is a good option too, although slightly more money.
The UH770 and other LG higher end LCDs do have local dimming but it's a poor implementation and some reviews recommend turning it off. The UH770 also doesn't have the same colour space as most HDR TVs or the next model up (UH850). I wouldn't buy it if HDR is a priority or you'll be disappointed but it might be an acceptable compromise if it appeals for other reasons.
Thanks for the info so you would say this is decent then?
http://www.currys.co.uk/gbuk/tv-and-home-entertainment/televisions/televisions/lg-49uh850v-smart-3d-4k-ultra-hd-hdr-49-led-tv-10144245-pdt.html
#15
daviesno1
EndlessWaves
HDR10 is a content format, and the most widespread one. Any TV that advertises HDR has the ability to read HDR10 content. However, the ability to read the content isn't the same as the ability to display it. Nothing right now supports the full range of pictures that HDR10 can record and while top of the range TVs do a good job, the capability declines as you go down the range. Most of the cheap 'HDR' TVs have no extra hardware for HDR at all.
Dannyrobbo
You are looking for a 10 bit panel HDR Tv. Google that and it'll show you
There's little difference between an 8-bit panel and a 10-bit panel. The big differences in HDR hardware are all in the backlight and electronics, not the LCD matrix itself. The 10-bit requirement is that the TV accepts a 10-bit signal as that's the format most HDR content uses. Everything does these days though, that was mostly a concern a year or two ago.
Generally Samsung's KS7000-KS9000 series are seen as good entry level 2016 options for some HDR display ability as they're the cheapest TVs to implement local dimming to a reasonable standard, which means they can display an actual improved brightness range. The XD93 is a good option too, although slightly more money.
The UH770 and other LG higher end LCDs do have local dimming but it's a poor implementation and some reviews recommend turning it off. The UH770 also doesn't have the same colour space as most HDR TVs or the next model up (UH850). I wouldn't buy it if HDR is a priority or you'll be disappointed but it might be an acceptable compromise if it appeals for other reasons.
Thanks for the info so you would say this is decent then?http://www.currys.co.uk/gbuk/tv-and-home-entertainment/televisions/televisions/lg-49uh850v-smart-3d-4k-ultra-hd-hdr-49-led-tv-10144245-pdt.html

That looks a decent tv at a good price. Have a look to see if richer sounds or John Lewis do it (sometimes currys have a slightly different model number for the same tv) because you will get a 5-6 year warranty. Richer sounds is the best as they have no depriciation clause for the replacement if it fails within warranty.
#16
Dannyrobbo
daviesno1
EndlessWaves
HDR10 is a content format, and the most widespread one. Any TV that advertises HDR has the ability to read HDR10 content. However, the ability to read the content isn't the same as the ability to display it. Nothing right now supports the full range of pictures that HDR10 can record and while top of the range TVs do a good job, the capability declines as you go down the range. Most of the cheap 'HDR' TVs have no extra hardware for HDR at all.
Dannyrobbo
You are looking for a 10 bit panel HDR Tv. Google that and it'll show you
There's little difference between an 8-bit panel and a 10-bit panel. The big differences in HDR hardware are all in the backlight and electronics, not the LCD matrix itself. The 10-bit requirement is that the TV accepts a 10-bit signal as that's the format most HDR content uses. Everything does these days though, that was mostly a concern a year or two ago.
Generally Samsung's KS7000-KS9000 series are seen as good entry level 2016 options for some HDR display ability as they're the cheapest TVs to implement local dimming to a reasonable standard, which means they can display an actual improved brightness range. The XD93 is a good option too, although slightly more money.
The UH770 and other LG higher end LCDs do have local dimming but it's a poor implementation and some reviews recommend turning it off. The UH770 also doesn't have the same colour space as most HDR TVs or the next model up (UH850). I wouldn't buy it if HDR is a priority or you'll be disappointed but it might be an acceptable compromise if it appeals for other reasons.
Thanks for the info so you would say this is decent then?http://www.currys.co.uk/gbuk/tv-and-home-entertainment/televisions/televisions/lg-49uh850v-smart-3d-4k-ultra-hd-hdr-49-led-tv-10144245-pdt.html
That looks a decent tv at a good price. Have a look to see if richer sounds or John Lewis do it (sometimes currys have a slightly different model number for the same tv) because you will get a 5-6 year warranty. Richer sounds is the best as they have no depriciation clause for the replacement if it fails within warranty.
Yeah I thought it looked good, can't find it at either of them though unfortunately.
#17
umirza85
EndlessWaves
umirza85
EndlessWaves
HDR10 is a content format, and the most widespread one. Any TV that advertises HDR has the ability to read HDR10 content. However, the ability to read the content isn't the same as the ability to display it. Nothing right now supports the full range of pictures that HDR10 can record and while top of the range TVs do a good job, the capability declines as you go down the range. Most of the cheap 'HDR' TVs have no extra hardware for HDR at all.
Dannyrobbo
You are looking for a 10 bit panel HDR Tv. Google that and it'll show you
There's little difference between an 8-bit panel and a 10-bit panel. The big differences in HDR hardware are all in the backlight and electronics, not the LCD matrix itself. The 10-bit requirement is that the TV accepts a 10-bit signal as that's the format most HDR content uses. Everything does these days though, that was mostly a concern a year or two ago.
Generally Samsung's KS7000-KS9000 series are seen as good entry level 2016 options for some HDR display ability as they're the cheapest TVs to implement local dimming to a reasonable standard, which means they can display an actual improved brightness range. The XD93 is a good option too, although slightly more money.
The UH770 and other LG higher end LCDs do have local dimming but it's a poor implementation and some reviews recommend turning it off. The UH770 also doesn't have the same colour space as most HDR TVs or the next model up (UH850). I wouldn't buy it if HDR is a priority or you'll be disappointed but it might be an acceptable compromise if it appeals for other reasons.
this was a great explanation, thanks. What are the main differences between the ks7,8, & 9000?
With the exception of the KS9500 they all seem to be very similar models. I haven't looked into them in detail but as far as I understand it the KS7500 and KS9000 are curved versions of the KS7000 and KS8000 respectively. The KS8000/KS9000 add various minor improvements like better speakers and improved motion handling over the KS7000/KS7500.
The KS9500 has a completely different backlight and is better, larger and more expensive. The verdicts on the 2017 models aren't in yet, but it was generally considered the second best HDR TV of the 2016 range after the Sony ZD9.
Thanks for detailing that out. Makes it much easier now that I know half the screens are curved (which I can rule out). If I'm spending around £1200-1300 on a 65", wonder if there are and 70-75" in that price range that are decent?

75" models are a lot more expensive. The flat models have sold out more quickly, there's more stock available of the curved ones.


Dannyrobbo
You can tell the difference between 8 and 10 bit easily


Which TVs have you compared specifically? There aren't many pairs that are similar other than their panel bit depth.

Dannyrobbo
HDR is much better with the large amount of colours from the 10 bit display.

The range of colours is determined by the frequencies of light emitted by the backlight and any enhancement layers (such as quantum dots). What the panel bit depth determines is the size of the steps between shades

So an 8-bit source may have 20 shades of blue across the sky while a 10-bit source may have 40 shades. The colours are identical but if you have too few shades across the colour range you get an effect called banding where you can see the steps between the colours. See the images here for exaggerated examples from a much more restricted colour palette of earlier days:
http://mosaicdesignservices.com/webgraphics/presentations/2003-11/GIFpalettesPS.html (the 8-bit mentioned there is 8-bits in total, TV 8-bit per channel would be 24-bit in that terminology).

Banding can also be caused by other things though, such as the TV's internal image processing.

daviesno1
Yeah I thought it looked good, can't find it at either of them though unfortunately.

Yeah, it's a Currys PC World exclusive in the UK unfortunately. The UH950 is similar picture-quality wise but it's a designer ultra-slim TV so it's more expensive (and starts at 55").

As I say there are mixed opinions on the backlighting system of the UH770/850/950 so I'd recommend going down to an AV shop and seeing it in action on HDR content before you buy to make sure it doesn't annoy you.
#18
EndlessWaves
umirza85
EndlessWaves
umirza85
EndlessWaves
HDR10 is a content format, and the most widespread one. Any TV that advertises HDR has the ability to read HDR10 content. However, the ability to read the content isn't the same as the ability to display it. Nothing right now supports the full range of pictures that HDR10 can record and while top of the range TVs do a good job, the capability declines as you go down the range. Most of the cheap 'HDR' TVs have no extra hardware for HDR at all.
Dannyrobbo
You are looking for a 10 bit panel HDR Tv. Google that and it'll show you
There's little difference between an 8-bit panel and a 10-bit panel. The big differences in HDR hardware are all in the backlight and electronics, not the LCD matrix itself. The 10-bit requirement is that the TV accepts a 10-bit signal as that's the format most HDR content uses. Everything does these days though, that was mostly a concern a year or two ago.
Generally Samsung's KS7000-KS9000 series are seen as good entry level 2016 options for some HDR display ability as they're the cheapest TVs to implement local dimming to a reasonable standard, which means they can display an actual improved brightness range. The XD93 is a good option too, although slightly more money.
The UH770 and other LG higher end LCDs do have local dimming but it's a poor implementation and some reviews recommend turning it off. The UH770 also doesn't have the same colour space as most HDR TVs or the next model up (UH850). I wouldn't buy it if HDR is a priority or you'll be disappointed but it might be an acceptable compromise if it appeals for other reasons.
this was a great explanation, thanks. What are the main differences between the ks7,8, & 9000?
With the exception of the KS9500 they all seem to be very similar models. I haven't looked into them in detail but as far as I understand it the KS7500 and KS9000 are curved versions of the KS7000 and KS8000 respectively. The KS8000/KS9000 add various minor improvements like better speakers and improved motion handling over the KS7000/KS7500.
The KS9500 has a completely different backlight and is better, larger and more expensive. The verdicts on the 2017 models aren't in yet, but it was generally considered the second best HDR TV of the 2016 range after the Sony ZD9.
Thanks for detailing that out. Makes it much easier now that I know half the screens are curved (which I can rule out). If I'm spending around £1200-1300 on a 65", wonder if there are and 70-75" in that price range that are decent?
75" models are a lot more expensive. The flat models have sold out more quickly, there's more stock available of the curved ones.
Dannyrobbo
You can tell the difference between 8 and 10 bit easily
Which TVs have you compared specifically? There aren't many pairs that are similar other than their panel bit depth.
Dannyrobbo
HDR is much better with the large amount of colours from the 10 bit display.
The range of colours is determined by the frequencies of light emitted by the backlight and any enhancement layers (such as quantum dots). What the panel bit depth determines is the size of the steps between shades
So an 8-bit source may have 20 shades of blue across the sky while a 10-bit source may have 40 shades. The colours are identical but if you have too few shades across the colour range you get an effect called banding where you can see the steps between the colours. See the images here for exaggerated examples from a much more restricted colour palette of earlier days:http://mosaicdesignservices.com/webgraphics/presentations/2003-11/GIFpalettesPS.html (the 8-bit mentioned there is 8-bits in total, TV 8-bit per channel would be 24-bit in that terminology).
Banding can also be caused by other things though, such as the TV's internal image processing.
daviesno1
Yeah I thought it looked good, can't find it at either of them though unfortunately.
Yeah, it's a Currys PC World exclusive in the UK unfortunately. The UH950 is similar picture-quality wise but it's a designer ultra-slim TV so it's more expensive (and starts at 55").
As I say there are mixed opinions on the backlighting system of the UH770/850/950 so I'd recommend going down to an AV shop and seeing it in action on HDR content before you buy to make sure it doesn't annoy you.

I bought a top of the line LG 3d TV a few years back..... I'm going with curved TVs will eventually go the way of 3d. Thanks for the heads up about flat screen stock, I was really just curious. If they are really exponentially more expensive i can deal with a 65" for now.

Edited By: umirza85 on Jun 19, 2017 23:06
#19
umirza85
I'm going with curved TVs will eventually go the way of 3d.

They already have.
#20
https://mattinee.files.wordpress.com/2013/01/the-matrix-whoa.jpg
EndlessWaves
umirza85
I'm going with curved TVs will eventually go the way of 3d.
They already have.

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