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How do you work out the dpi of a photo?

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I'm trying to work out the dpi of a photo on my Samsung galaxy and I Googled how to do it and I'm even more confused. what's the easiest way to work it out? Resolution: 4032x3024 Read More
ysm1234 Avatar
6m, 1w agoPosted 6 months, 1 week ago
I'm trying to work out the dpi of a photo on my Samsung galaxy and I Googled how to do it and I'm even more confused. what's the easiest way to work it out?

Resolution: 4032x3024
ysm1234 Avatar
6m, 1w agoPosted 6 months, 1 week ago
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#1
It depends on the size you print.

Say you've an an image of width 1920 x 1080 (FHD 1080p) If you printed this to 1" width, it would be 1920dpi. If you printed it to 2" it would be 960 dpi and so on.

Hopefully that's a simple enough explanation
#2
As far as I'm aware it doesnt have any dots per inch. It is measured by pixels . w x h . The resolution of a print is pixels per inch.

You can upload the photo to an editing program and right click the file properties to give you more info.
#3
If the photo is from somewhere else then there may also be a dpi hint in the files metadata that an image editing program will be able to tell you about. This is purely a recommendation though and has nothing to do with the image data.
#4
I might be totally wrong on this.
But, DPI (Dots Per Inch) is for Printers etc and PPI (Pixels Per Inch) is for image editors and screens etc.

Usually Lightroom and Photoshop (or other image editing software) and your Printer should all be set to and use 300 as the resolution (DPI/PPI).

Altering this figure, would make you image appear smaller/larger.
#5
Both DPI and PPI are physical real world values that relate to how many dots per inch are printed or how any Pixels per inch are displayed. Both of these have fixed maxium limits but a image can be any resolution within memory limitations.



If it's a photo then you need both the photo Aspect ratio.
https://toolstud.io/photo/megapixel.php?width=4032&height=3024

Aspect ratio 1.33 == 4:3 like the standard SD TV picture ratio

So this isn't a scanned picture but something that has been taken with a digital camera.

https://toolstud.io/photo/megapixel.php?width=4032&height=3024&compare=video&calculate=print#calculate
These are the fixed print sizes of how big it would be if you printed it at different resolutions.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photo_print_sizes

Look up the 4:3 aspect ratios on the chart and it will tend you what photos you can scale to without cropping the edges

1350 x 1800 4.5" x 6" photo
1800 x 2400 6" x 8" photo

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