How long do you reasonably expect your washing machine to last? - HotUKDeals
We use cookie files to improve site functionality and personalisation. By continuing to use HUKD, you accept our cookie and privacy policy.
Get the HUKD app free at Google Play

Search Error

An error occurred when searching, please try again!

Login / Sign UpSubmit
Expired

How long do you reasonably expect your washing machine to last?

furi0n Avatar
2y, 4m agoPosted 2 years, 4 months ago
I purchased a Whirlpool washing machine about 2 years ago, at a push it's used twice a week (small family) and it recently broke down - a local washing machine engineer diagnosed the circuit board as faulty. The product is outwith its 1 year warranty period. Considering the type of fault I was advised the repair would be approx. £150 including parts.

Before committing to the repair I thought I'd report the issue to Whirlpool direct. In summary, after speaking with 2 customer care representatives and a manager from headquarters, this is what I was informed -

1. The product is outwith the warranty period
2. I should of purchased extended warranty
3. It's an electrical product, these things happen - this issue is subject to all electrical appliances.
4. It's standard across all companies, the customer is expected to foot the bill or purchase extended warranty outwith the warranty period if they want peace of mind.
5. There's nothing that we can offer.

Whirlpool weren't willing to budge at all or compromise. I was quoted £85 engineer call-out charge not including the part (circuit board).

When I asked, I expected the machine to last at least 5 years, the manager responded by asking - So you're determining/ setting the standard how long a product should last? To which, I replied, products have a certain life span and from people's general opinion and from consumer websites it's about 5 years in this day and age for a washing machine.

What do you think, is 5 years about right?
Is there any other recourse to this matter?

Thanks
furi0n Avatar
2y, 4m agoPosted 2 years, 4 months ago
Options

All Responses

(28) Jump to unreadPost an answer
Responses/page:
#1
Woah! That's ridiculous! Only two years?

Now, I don't know much about law and stuff, but isn't the legal requirement for EU Electricals 2 or 3 years anyway? Someone correct me on this, but doesn't this mean that they SHOULD be fixing it for you, free of charge?

My Samsung one has lasted me for around 4 years already, and has never missed a beat.

I think that it should be more than 5 years, in my opinion.
#2
Quote the Sale of Goods act 1979 that regardless of it being out of warranty it has failed too soon. A reasonable time for a washing machine to last in my own personal opinion is 3-4 years (I'm a heavy washer).

As per the sales of goods act 1979, *the retailer* arrange for a repair or replace the product free of charge if it has failed within a reasonable length of time.

You have a case - Amazon just replaced my 16 month hoover on the basis my other hoovers lasted 5 years+
#3
I suppose it all depends how much you use it.... I would expect a decent washer to last 10 year really if not more. I have had mine for 6 years, the only problem I have had is needing to replace the brushes, which I got of ebay for £6.

I use my washer virtually every day.
#4
I guess it depends
You could be running it daily or you could be running it once a fortnight and it will make a difference
In my case, I was going through machines almost every 2 years but my most recent bosch one is now in its 3rd year without any issues
The difference: Better make and model but more importantly, I've been doing the maintenance that I took for granted in the past such as descaling, clearing filters and leaving the door/draw open after a wash to air it

I live in a very hard water area which does not do the machinery any good so descaling was important in my case.

Having said that, for normal once a week use, I would expect much longer than 2 years if treated well.
This time round I also bought extended warranty just to cover myself but typically I have not had to use it this time round.
#5
the circuit board on my washing machine blew after water got onto it.
and I found a website which repairs them, you just post it to them they fix it and you pop it back in.
cost me about £25 altogether
#6
AzNDeals
Woah! That's ridiculous! Only two years?

Now, I don't know much about law and stuff, but isn't the legal requirement for EU Electricals 2 or 3 years anyway? Someone correct me on this, but doesn't this mean that they SHOULD be fixing it for you, free of charge?

My Samsung one has lasted me for around 4 years already, and has never missed a beat.

I think that it should be more than 5 years, in my opinion.

Thanks, I did think 5 years is rather conservative, I honestly think at least 10 years. In the manner how products are massed produced, re-badged etc 5 years maybe more reasonable.
#7
ProPiers
Quote the Sale of Goods act 1979 that regardless of it being out of warranty it has failed too soon. A reasonable time for a washing machine to last in my own personal opinion is 3-4 years (I'm a heavy washer).

As per the sales of goods act 1979, *the retailer* arrange for a repair or replace the product free of charge if it has failed within a reasonable length of time.

You have a case - Amazon just replaced my 16 month hoover on the basis my other hoovers lasted 5 years+

This is my thinking too, probably should of taken it up with the retailer in the first instace, as you say, quoting the Sale of Goods Act. Thanks for your iput.
#8
Crazy Chris
I suppose it all depends how much you use it.... I would expect a decent washer to last 10 year really if not more. I have had mine for 6 years, the only problem I have had is needing to replace the brushes, which I got of ebay for £6.

I use my washer virtually every day.

If only it was a brushes issue, I've replaced this part on washing machines I've had in the past, simple and basic task.
#9
aj84
I guess it depends
You could be running it daily or you could be running it once a fortnight and it will make a difference
In my case, I was going through machines almost every 2 years but my most recent bosch one is now in its 3rd year without any issues
The difference: Better make and model but more importantly, I've been doing the maintenance that I took for granted in the past such as descaling, clearing filters and leaving the door/draw open after a wash to air it

I live in a very hard water area which does not do the machinery any good so descaling was important in my case.

Having said that, for normal once a week use, I would expect much longer than 2 years if treated well.
This time round I also bought extended warranty just to cover myself but typically I have not had to use it this time round.

Living here up in bonny Scotland, the water is generally 'softer', even more so where I live. One can understand if the machine was heavily used, not maintained and in a hard water area, it is reasonable to expect the product life span to suffer as a result.
#10
stefromuk
the circuit board on my washing machine blew after water got onto it.
and I found a website which repairs them, you just post it to them they fix it and you pop it back in.
cost me about £25 altogether

Oh! This could be an option, can you please provide the link?
[helper]#11
It's worth contacting TS (http://www.tradingstandards.gov.uk/advice/index.cfm) or CAB (http://www.adviceguide.org.uk/)

You are being fobbed off with something from the "Manufacturers Handbook" i.e they all try this on to get out of repairing/repair costs. (I used to work in electrical retail and wholesale)

Did you buy it direct from Whirlpool or through a retailer? if through a retailer speak to them as we used to just ring manufacturers up and have a moan and they would fix stuff (this is going back 5 years ago though)

Also did you pay by credit card as you may get some sort of cover via CC/Bank.

I totally agree that your WM should have lasted longer than 2 years. Ours is about 10 years old and has been used by us and my brother in law and has moved house 3 times and is still going.

But yeah contact TS/CAB and atleast you will 100% know where you stand and they may even contact the manufacturer on yur behalf.

If you do end up having to foot the cost for a repair, I would suggest just buying a new one.

Edited By: Holly1985 on Jul 22, 2014 11:02
#12
We have a family of four and our washing machine runs at least twice a day everyday. As a result the last two I've purchased I got extended warranty (I don't really agree with the whole extended thing but nevertheless) The warranty lasted for 5 years and both times I've claimed. First time it packed in with weeks to go. Second time it packed it just after 12 months, 18 months, 2 years. luckily all covered. bosch machine first time, hot point second. my thinking regarding the cheaper hotpoint was I could buy a triple a rated machine and a five year guarantee for the same as a the bosch one with one year guarantee.
As you've been told though the 1979 sales of goods act is real and there to protect the consumer. They are trying to fob you off as it's in their own interests. I took a chainsaw back to b&q that broke after their 90 day warranty. ...I printed out sales of goods act to back me up and had to argue quite hard with customer service, assistant manager and manager for about 20 minutes till they finally conceded that it's not acceptable for an item to fail so soon after purchase and gave me a new one. Took some effort to stand my ground as they weren't for backing down at first but it paid off. Good luck!
#13
ProPiers
Quote the Sale of Goods act 1979 that regardless of it being out of warranty it has failed too soon. A reasonable time for a washing machine to last in my own personal opinion is 3-4 years (I'm a heavy washer).

As per the sales of goods act 1979, *the retailer* arrange for a repair or replace the product free of charge if it has failed within a reasonable length of time.

You have a case - Amazon just replaced my 16 month hoover on the basis my other hoovers lasted 5 years+

I agree but the "argument is "reasonable" time which allows manufacturers to try to ignore their responsibility.

Trading Standards might look at the case but I think your best bet would be to write directly to the manufacturer (with signed for postage) and ask again for repair/replacement quoting the SOG Act but threaten legal action in the small claims court if no reply/action is taken within 14/28days
#14
My washing machine packed in about three days before its one year warranty was set to expire. They spent the entirety of the phone call trying to scare me, saying that if It is deemed that I broke the machine then they would charge me £200(!) for call out an subsequent repair, but if I bought the extended warranty then I wouldn't have to worry for years. When I turned the guy down he got all nasty and demanded to know why I didn't want extended warranty.

Te repair guy himself was actually a great guy who did a terrific job. Dealing with Indesit was a nightmare though.

So yeah, it took less than one year for mine to need a fix - and I needed to fight with a salesman in sheep's clothing to get it.
#15
SHOPPERS are wasting their money on extended warranties and should take retailers to court instead if electrical appliances break down within five years, according to experts.
Consumer groups have said British shoppers are throwing away up to £800m a year on expensive extended warranties, often unaware that they are already protected by the law.

The Scottish Consumer Council is about to launch a campaign encouraging pe


ople to take advantage of their statutory rights. By law, retailers can be forced to repair appliances if they malfunction within five years - the length of time most extended warranties last.

The move comes as profits from the sale of extended warranties are soaring in the UK. Shoppers already spend more than £800m on them each year, and the Office of Fair Trading (OFT) estimates the figure will rise to £1bn in just three years’ time. Their sale is currently being investigated by the government watchdog the Competition Commission.

Because of fierce competition on the high street, which forces shops to keep their prices down, retailers are instead aggressively promoting the sale of expensive extended warranties to boost their profits.

Last night, Graeme Millar, chairman of the Scottish Consumer Council, said it was planning a new leaflet campaign urging shoppers to know and use their rights.

He said: "The evidence is that extended warranties are not required. Your statutory rights should protect you, and you have to be steadfast and go through the process to invoke them. Some people might think that is too much hassle, but the process is clearly there for consumers to use.

"I would urge people to realise they already have legal rights which they can enforce against a retailer."

The Sale of Goods Act 1979 gives consumers the power to sue a retailer for damages up to five years after a product is bought if it breaks down during that time.

Millar said consumers should argue that it was reasonable to expect a major appliance not to break down within five years.

He added that in most cases retailers would back down and offer to repair the appliance rather than challenge a small claims procedure, which covers damages of up to £750.

Millar said: "If you threaten the retailer with the small claims court, that might produce a resolution without having to go through with an action."

A small claim costs £39 to bring. The consumer then has to hire an independent expert to assess if the damage was caused by a design or manufacturing fault. This can cost as little as £10. The retailer has to refund the costs if it loses the action.

Firms can successfully defend the action by arguing that the breakdown was caused by wear and tear or improper use. But trading standards officers believe modern appliances are now so durable that any fault in the first five years is likely to be caused by a manufacturing problem rather than heavy use.

Bill Cassie, chairman of the Society of Chief Officers of Trading Standards in Scotland, said: "If there is a genuine major fault in a major appliance, then I think the customer can take advantage of their legal rights and win an action."

Cassie urged consumers not to be afraid of using the law.

"Some people will be unhappy at the thought of standing up for themselves, but the small claims procedure is simple these days and there are all sorts of organisations that will help you through the process," he said.

When contacted by Scotland on Sunday, electrical goods manufacturers refused to disclose the expected life span of their products.

Nevertheless, most experts believe more than five years’ service, and in most cases far longer, should be expected from most major household domestic appliances such as washing machines, refrigerators and dishwashers.

At the John Lewis department store in Edinburgh, an employee explained that the firm’s insurance company, which sets the costs of its extended warranty schemes, estimates the average life span of refrigerators is 10 years. Washing machines should also last about 10 years, while the life span of dishwashers, which are more complex, can vary between five and 20 years.

John Lewis also offers a free five-year guarantee on televisions, which implies it believes the risk of breakdown is low.

Dr Ian Craighead, a senior lecturer in mechanical engineering at Strathclyde University, specialises in analysing mechanical failure in appliances.

Craighead estimated that the life span of a fridge is 10 years, and that of washing machines and dishwashers is about eight years. "Fridges are very simple," he said. "Washing machines and dishwashers are more complex, but still should be very reliable."

Craighead rejected claims that manufacturers deliberately use components they know will fail within a short period of time to force customers to spend more money buying another appliance.

He said: "It would be counter-productive. The consumer is not going to be enamoured of a brand, and buy the new model with improved features, if the last one broke down."

Last year, a report by the OFT found that the average washing machine and television should have a life span of eight years.

It also found that the average costs of a television repair and washing machine repair were £47 and £51 respectively. Extended warranties can cost up to £200 for five years. This suggests an appliance would have to malfunction four times to justify the warranty cost.

The OFT has also suggested most people’s household insurance would cover the cost of repairs to appliances.

But retailers have defended the practice of selling extended warranties.

Henrietta Whitsun-Jones, of the electrical chain Dixons, said: "Our warranties cover accidental damage as well as mechanical failure, and our customers want peace of mind.

"Many customers would rather pay for a warranty than risk incurring the inconvenience and cost of a small claims court with an uncertain outcome."
#16
Recently replaced my washing machine after 10 years and it never gave me any bother. I'd expect the new one to last at least 5 years.
#17
furi0n
stefromuk
the circuit board on my washing machine blew after water got onto it.
and I found a website which repairs them, you just post it to them they fix it and you pop it back in.
cost me about £25 altogether

Oh! This could be an option, can you please provide the link?

yeah will do,
it's bookmarked on laptop favourites .
I'll have a look soon as I get home
#18
I would hope for 10+ years on any kitchen white goods.

thankfully, I havent been let down yet

Bosch classixx - 12 year old washing machine

fridge - beko -15 years

dishwasher - beko -14 years

tumble dryer - white knight - 12 years

mobile - MOTOROLA moto g - replaced twice in the last 5 months and bought 6 months ago and no power whatsoever this morning on a 3 week old new replacement ;)

gotta love inbuilt obsolescence :)

Edited By: chocci on Jul 22, 2014 18:09
#19
same thing happened to me with a newish TV,thanks to the HUKDers i managed to fight my case and got a full refund (on the basis i purchased a new TV)...i couldnt have done it without the help and advice from people on here....not sure if theres any way to pull my thread up and have a read,i would imagine you will have been given the same info as what i got....Argos backed down saying if it was a manufacturing fault then they would refund...an independant repair guy came and had a look,charged me £60 for a report,which,i claimed back from Argos too...Good Luck.
#20
I would expect minimum of about 5 years, I've had my Bosch about 5 years and use it a lot and wouldn't be surprised if it lasts another 5 years.!!!.
banned#21
I wonder how these companies keep going with their appalling customer service.... Good luck at getting it sorted
#22
furi0n
stefromuk
the circuit board on my washing machine blew after water got onto it.
and I found a website which repairs them, you just post it to them they fix it and you pop it back in.
cost me about £25 altogether

Oh! This could be an option, can you please provide the link?

Hi here's the website link HERE
#23
Whirlpool are buying a 60% share in Indesit, which in turn are the same group as Hotpoint, so basically you are buggered. This is why I will only buy a washing machine with a full 5 year parts and labour guarantee. Sadly these companies sell the same products under different names and they are not bothered as they count on you unwittingly buying another one of their brands. I will say I think a washing machine lasting under two years used about twice a week is very poor at best. Good luck.
#24
My Bosch is in its 14th year and still doing the business. Won't be too sad when it does die tho as my friend's £200 Beko is a lot quieter and quicker lol :p Wouldn't touch Whirlpool kit with a shotty stick

I use Calgon regularly as I live in a hard water area

Edited By: tallpete33 on Jul 22, 2014 20:40
#25
stefromuk
furi0n
stefromuk
the circuit board on my washing machine blew after water got onto it.
and I found a website which repairs them, you just post it to them they fix it and you pop it back in.
cost me about £25 altogether

Oh! This could be an option, can you please provide the link?

Hi here's the website link HERE

Thanks for taking the time and effort. Will try this as a last resort. As most have suggested, will try to negotiate with retailer in the first instance.
#26
Your contract is with the supplier, not the manufacturer. Contact them and cc your credit card company as they have joint liability. If you bought from Comet and either paid cash or debit card, you're snookered.
#27
Our last Whirpool lasted 7yrs and had a hard life, used at least once a day, but it eventually died after several fixes by myself, most are easy fixes and it seems the 'Faulty Board' is a favourite but never had one break on us yet, the Hotpoint before that was 10yrs old and gave it away, so as far as we know still spinning.

A lot machines are an easy fix and most have 'common' faults, never paid to have any of ours fixed.

How did it break down? Out of curiosity.
#28
30 minutes on a fast cycle 1hr 35 mins on full :D

Post an Answer

You don't need an account to leave a response. Just enter your email address. We'll keep it private.

...OR log in with your social account

...OR comment using your social account

Thanks for your comment! Keep it up!
We just need to have a quick look and it will be live soon.
The community is happy to hear your opinion! Keep contributing!