How serious do you think these cracks are?! - HotUKDeals
We use cookie files to improve site functionality and personalisation. By continuing to use HotUKDeals, you accept our cookie and privacy policy.
Get the HotUKDeals app free at Google Play

Search Error

An error occurred when searching, please try again!

Login / Sign UpSubmit

How serious do you think these cracks are?!

£0.00 @
I would be grateful if you had more knowledge than I do to let me know how serious you think these cracks are! Read More
sicklysweet Avatar
3m, 2d agoPosted 3 months, 2 days ago
I would be grateful if you had more knowledge than I do to let me know how serious you think these cracks are!
sicklysweet Avatar
3m, 2d agoPosted 3 months, 2 days ago
Options

All Responses

(33) Jump to unreadPost an answer
Responses/page:
#1
http://i1168.photobucket.com/albums/r485/sicklysweetphotos/JHT/80746BA9-31A7-43DA-A4E1-A75AD52DAE81_zpsm8gnqeiw.jpg

http://i1168.photobucket.com/albums/r485/sicklysweetphotos/JHT/FCF643C5-A66C-4930-AAA9-E7850A0F97E3_zpsiyjqis2j.jpg

Thank you for any help or advice that you may have.

Edited By: sickly sweet on Jan 23, 2017 19:58
#2
Nothing to worry about. Unless you are on a Sink hole.(_;)
#3
Rendering cracks only, they will get worse over time, they won't affect the stability of the building.
#4
Nothing to worry about. Just the render and concrete cracking. Houses move. Will get worse when water gets joint so fill and paint. It's when you have a crack on the inside of house and outside in the same area. Oh that can be trouble.
#5
Top picture will be because of movement of the brick arch below the render.

Second one will need replacing at some point. If it's a fall risk on people (or looks like kitchen roof) then you could have a steel bracing plate fitted under it to hold it all together. This is a temporary fix mind.

The brickwork in general could do with looking at as could the pointing.
banned#6
Nowt to worry about. Make sure your insurance is up to date as usual.

They are NOT render cracks.

Gavin is correct.
#7
Thank you for your advice.

Now I just need to assess how serious the damp problem is.

I've been given ballpark figures (two up, two down property) of £1,500 - £3,000 to damp proof it.

It was built in the 1900s.
#8
I really am grateful for the advice. Thank you so much.
#9
sickly sweet
Thank you for your advice.

Now I just need to assess how serious the damp problem is.

I've been given ballpark figures (two up, two down property) of £1,500 - £3,000 to damp proof it.

It was built in the 1900s.


What type of damp have you been told that you are suffering from?

What are the symptoms?
#10
For peace of mind keep these photographs, measure the length of the cracks close up where access allows by holding a ruler against the crack. Repeat in 6 and 12 months comparing photographs to determine any further movement. Photographs may also be useful if you decide to sell to prove lack of movement.
#11
Truthfully it's not possible to diagnose a defect or lack of one from two small pictures. It is clear brickwork has been previously repaired above one opening and below the other but not either side. There are probably other clues inside and out.

Get a Chartered Surveyor to advise if you want to be reassured.
#12
A lot of damp problems can be due to poor ventilation, are the ground floors wood or concrete, if wood then are there air bricks in the outside walls. Is the outside ground level below the interior floor level, do the down pipes carry the rain water away from the building properly. More photographs might help.
#13
sickly sweet
Thank you for your advice.
Now I just need to assess how serious the damp problem is.
I've been given ballpark figures (two up, two down property) of £1,500 - £3,000 to damp proof it.
It was built in the 1900s.

Hi SS,

I'm guessing you are looking at buying it?

A basic DPC is likely going to cost around the figures you have been quoted.

How much you actually spend will depend on the overall plan for the house. Looking at the photos provided it has been patch and tarted up in the last few years which suggests it's not been looked after all that well.

If you plan to rent it out cheap then sorting the damp a small bit of plastering and some paint will do.

If it's a long term house then the brickwork, render and probably the roof will need looking at. Internal or external insulation is probably worth a look too.

Sadly old houses like there need TLC what they have not been looked after.

Good luck. :)
#14
Thank you everyone.

I'm looking at the possibility of buying the terraced house at auction (eeekkkk!).

The row of houses is known for having damp problems due to the local water meadows etc. and with the terrace being built in the 1900s the damp proof courses weren't what they are today.

The house looks like it's been loved and looked after at some point in the past, but truth is that it will never be worth spending too much on improving the property as its' ceiling price is low.

It's a really nice little property, just two up two down and a downstairs bathroom, but it's well positioned and would make a really nice little home.

Exciting but nerve wracking.

With it being an auction property, the opportunity for full surveys is limited so you guys are my first port of call!

I'm not frightened by it just yet, you haven't put me off X)
#15
The roof and chimney looked OK. I looked at both the front and the back.

The back of the house (where these pics were taken) I would have thought was probably north facing but I'll take a compass with me when I do the official viewing (February) which may explain why it's a bit more crack-y.

There was access to the garden (where these photos were taken) via an alleyway and the alleyway was mildly damp to the touch at the bottom.

It's easy to pop by, and the official viewing isn't until February so I've got time to get things sorted. The second viewing is 5 days after the first viewing, and then the auction up in London a few weeks later.

EDIT: it's being sold by a company that mainly deals with social housing, and sold via auction. All a bit weird but they sold the house next door in 2015. I can only assume they're moving out of the area and concentrating on elsewhere but I've got time to do more research.

Edited By: sickly sweet on Jan 23, 2017 21:14
#16
could be a broken drain washing away subsoil and causing subsidence , regards damproofing it you can hire a big drill the dpc liquid. and you even get the certificate with the liquid
#17
sickly roughly whereabouts is the house ,if its miles from london itll be worth going for as nobody in the south wants northern properties so they can go for peanuts in auction I know someone who bought an old hospital for £109k
#18
Will we see you in "homes under the hammer"? ;)
#19
what kind of price are u thinking for this property vs any others on the open market at the moment I have seen few houses going for more in auction recently than other methods what ever you do. Add the figures for any works u think needed and see if there's much differnce between the 2 if not stay away and don't get exited and over bid be aware of tall the fees some auctions charge buyers fees factor that in and also some vendors want u pay for solicitors fees look at the auction pack when it's available it will have all the main searches done for u like local and mining etc. so if there's any mineshaft too close u can decide if ur comfortable with that are u buying it cash I assume or mortgage .
#20
tomminator
could be a broken drain washing away subsoil and causing subsidence , regards damproofing it you can hire a big drill the dpc liquid. and you even get the certificate with the liquid


If DPC is needed I'll definitely get a company in. I'm not by any stretch of the imagination able to do that!!


tomminator
sickly roughly whereabouts is the house ,if its miles from london itll be worth going for as nobody in the south wants northern properties so they can go for peanuts in auction I know someone who bought an old hospital for £109k


In the south.

I need to work out if the financials could work. There's another property on the road which has 4 beds, 2 baths and it's about £80k more, but as lovely as that would be it's not viable.

Being next to a dual carriageway will also limit the price as its fairly noisy.

I think the auction being in London will limit the number of people bidding for it, so it may be possible.

It's definitely got chipboard, which I suspect will cost too much to remove, but I'll check for artex next time I snoop through the window or when I go for the viewing.

I'm tempted to view the 4 bed house on the street just to get more information on the area, visit it at a different time and pick the brains of the estate agent and see what they think is a realistic price for the 4 bed.
#21
LillyM
Will we see you in "homes under the hammer"? ;)


I'd send my dad to do the bidding.

I'd blatantly go above my upper limit X)
#22
sickly sweet
LillyM
Will we see you in "homes under the hammer"? ;)
I'd send my dad to do the bidding.
I'd blatantly go above my upper limit X)
Very wise :) hope it works out for you :)
#23
muddassarsardar
what kind of price are u thinking for this property vs any others on the open market at the moment I have seen few houses going for more in auction recently than other methods what ever you do. Add the figures for any works u think needed and see if there's much differnce between the 2 if not stay away and don't get exited and over bid be aware of tall the fees some auctions charge buyers fees factor that in and also some vendors want u pay for solicitors fees look at the auction pack when it's available it will have all the main searches done for u like local and mining etc. so if there's any mineshaft too close u can decide if ur comfortable with that are u buying it cash I assume or mortgage .


That's something I'm going to work out in the next week.

There's a 1.5% +VAT charge to cover the vendors fees, and the buyers charges associated with buying at auction, so I'll have to bear it all in mind.

And then this anomaly of the underpriced 4 bed property on the street.

I have a solicitor in mind that I'd be happy to use (they sorted out my will and were very efficient when conveyancing my parents' property).

The area isn't likely to suffer from mine shafts, but I'm waiting for the auction house to release the legal pack and I will look through that with an eagle eye (and get my parents too as well) before taking things further.

I'm not emotionally connected to the house, but it is exciting enough to make me interested and think it might be possible and just 'work'.
#24
Stamp duty will be either 0% or negligible.

I'm trying to be sensible about this and am totally willing to walk away if the financials don't stack up or I feel that the project will be too big or complicated.

For now, it looks feasible and do-able.

If get more photos I'll let you know, but I definitely looked at the roof & chimney and thought it seemed OK.

I'm surprised that DPC comes in at £1,500-£3,000, for some reason I assumed £7,000+. No idea why X)
#25
Doesnt look that bad but i am no expert even though i invest in properties!

I would advice you get a surveyor to look at the property before bidding, or at least a knowledgeable builder. I have never bought a property at auction and my husband is actually a surveyor.
#26
I would definitely get a competent builder who you trust to view the property. You can usually arrange to have a surveyor look at it outside of the viewing times, but you need to arrange this with the auction house. We have bought two properties at auction, but both were under £100k - we didn't get them surveyed, but we read the legal packs inside out and did local searches with the council. Hope it goes well for you.
#27
Looks like the render in the top pics will need removing as it hasn't been done well at all.

Factor in the cost to point and render if needed.

Good luck :)
#28
sickly sweet
Stamp duty will be either 0% or negligible.
I'm trying to be sensible about this and am totally willing to walk away if the financials don't stack up or I feel that the project will be too big or complicated.
For now, it looks feasible and do-able.
If get more photos I'll let you know, but I definitely looked at the roof & chimney and thought it seemed OK.
I'm surprised that DPC comes in at £1,500-£3,000, for some reason I assumed £7,000+. No idea why X)

Your thinking of under pinning which is in the £1000's to do.
DPC is injected into the brick.
#29
markvirgo
sickly sweet
Stamp duty will be either 0% or negligible.
I'm trying to be sensible about this and am totally willing to walk away if the financials don't stack up or I feel that the project will be too big or complicated.
For now, it looks feasible and do-able.
If get more photos I'll let you know, but I definitely looked at the roof & chimney and thought it seemed OK.
I'm surprised that DPC comes in at £1,500-£3,000, for some reason I assumed £7,000+. No idea why X)

Your thinking of under pinning which is in the £1000's to do.
DPC is injected into the brick.


under pinning is in the tens of thousands not just thousands plus after underpinning it's very difficult to sell a property even though it will be safer than the rest of the houses around it. so are u going.for a mortgage or cash buy
#30
Mermoo
I would definitely get a competent builder who you trust to view the property. You can usually arrange to have a surveyor look at it outside of the viewing times, but you need to arrange this with the auction house. We have bought two properties at auction, but both were under £100k - we didn't get them surveyed, but we read the legal packs inside out and did local searches with the council. Hope it goes well for you.


There are two open house viewings. I'm going with my dad for the first one and if I'm still interested then I'm taking a good builder with me for viewing number two!


markvirgo
sickly sweet
Stamp duty will be either 0% or negligible.
I'm trying to be sensible about this and am totally willing to walk away if the financials don't stack up or I feel that the project will be too big or complicated.
For now, it looks feasible and do-able.
If get more photos I'll let you know, but I definitely looked at the roof & chimney and thought it seemed OK.
I'm surprised that DPC comes in at £1,500-£3,000, for some reason I assumed £7,000+. No idea why X)
Your thinking of under pinning which is in the £1000's to do.
DPC is injected into the brick.


I was just thinking damp proof course. Not underpinning. I don't really suspect any issues with regards to subsidence from what I've seen of the houses on the street. They were all built in the 1900s and despite the damp due to the area they were built on they otherwise look pretty solid and sound.

There's a house a couple of doors down for sale, with 3 bedrooms (rather than 2 bedrooms, and it has an extra reception room & ensuite) which has been done up nicely which is double the auction price for the 2 bed place. I doubt the 3 bed place will get anywhere near their asking price, but it's somewhat reassuring for the moment, as there's confidence in the area, road etc.

EDIT: I was definitely thinking £7k for the DPC as I thought that the flooring all had to come up and then it was painted with the product etc. I just seem to remember that's what they did to my parents house, but I'm clearly wrong!

This is my first time buying a house, let alone at auction, so I'm learning as I go along and I'm happy to take my time. If that means I miss out on a property then so be it, there will always be another one!

Financing is complicated but will be in place, if necessary, prior to the auction date.

Edited By: sickly sweet on Jan 23, 2017 23:42
#31
Would the vendor be open to a cheeky offer to avoid fees?
#32
muddassarsardar
markvirgo
sickly sweet
Stamp duty will be either 0% or negligible.
I'm trying to be sensible about this and am totally willing to walk away if the financials don't stack up or I feel that the project will be too big or complicated.
For now, it looks feasible and do-able.
If get more photos I'll let you know, but I definitely looked at the roof & chimney and thought it seemed OK.
I'm surprised that DPC comes in at £1,500-£3,000, for some reason I assumed £7,000+. No idea why X)
Your thinking of under pinning which is in the £1000's to do.
DPC is injected into the brick.

under pinning is in the tens of thousands not just thousands plus after underpinning it's very difficult to sell a property even though it will be safer than the rest of the houses around it. so are u going.for a mortgage or cash buy


Financing it is complicated but it'll all be in place before the auction date, if necessary.
muddassarsardar
markvirgo
sickly sweet
Stamp duty will be either 0% or negligible.
I'm trying to be sensible about this and am totally willing to walk away if the financials don't stack up or I feel that the project will be too big or complicated.
For now, it looks feasible and do-able.
If get more photos I'll let you know, but I definitely looked at the roof & chimney and thought it seemed OK.
I'm surprised that DPC comes in at £1,500-£3,000, for some reason I assumed £7,000+. No idea why X)
Your thinking of under pinning which is in the £1000's to do.
DPC is injected into the brick.

under pinning is in the tens of thousands not just thousands plus after underpinning it's very difficult to sell a property even though it will be safer than the rest of the houses around it. so are u going.for a mortgage or cash buy


If a house needed underpinning i would walk away. No way would I touch it.

Nor would I buy a listed building.

I realise my limits X)
#33
nbgrobbo
Would the vendor be open to a cheeky offer to avoid fees?


It says 'under no circumstances will this property be sold prior to auction'.

I've contacted them and am awaiting the legal pack to see where that leaves me and if it's still an interesting prospect.

I'm surprised how many properties sell prior to auction, it's clearly worth putting in cheeky offers!

Post an Answer

You don't need an account to leave a response. Just enter your email address. We'll keep it private.

...OR log in with your social account

...OR comment using your social account

Thanks for your comment! Keep it up!
We just need to have a quick look and it will be live soon.
The community is happy to hear your opinion! Keep contributing!