Import duties when buying from aliexpress/banggood/gearbest - HotUKDeals
We use cookie files to improve site functionality and personalisation. By continuing to use HotUKDeals, you accept our cookie and privacy policy.
Get the HotUKDeals app free at Google Play

Search Error

An error occurred when searching, please try again!

Login / Sign UpSubmit

Import duties when buying from aliexpress/banggood/gearbest

£0.00 @ BangGood
Hi everyone, I've been looking for a while and I'm thinking about buying a xiaomi redmi 4 prime from aliexpress (delivered from china, of course) as it's £125 from there. I have also been looking for … Read More
bcfc_bailey Avatar
2m, 1w agoPosted 2 months, 1 week ago
Hi everyone, I've been looking for a while and I'm thinking about buying a xiaomi redmi 4 prime from aliexpress (delivered from china, of course) as it's £125 from there. I have also been looking for exactly the same phone on ebay where it is £166 (but this one is delivered from London) and I'm a bit confused in terms of whether I'll have to pay import taxes or duties if I buy from ali. Obviously the £40 price difference is tempting and I understand I could be waiting for several weeks if ordered from there but if I have to pay for it to be imported the costs will go above the one from ebay and having done a google search there's no clear answer on if I will have to pay the extra fees or not.

So what I'm asking is does anyone have any first hand experience with buying phones from these chinese sellers lately and did you have to pay additional fees? Or is it just a bit of pot luck?

Thanks in advance!

p.s I know the phone doesn't have band 20 but I'm with EE so should be fine!
Other Links From BangGood:
bcfc_bailey Avatar
2m, 1w agoPosted 2 months, 1 week ago
Options

All Responses

(30) Jump to unreadPost an answer
Responses/page:
#1
i bought a xiaomi redmi note 3 pro from aliexpress and if u buy it with the standard delivery option you won't get hit with custom charges, however if you opt for dhl posting you will get custom charges.

and realistically your looking at 14 too 21 days for delivery.

hope that's helpful.
#2
o_neil_o
i bought a xiaomi redmi note 3 pro from aliexpress and if u buy it with the standard delivery option you won't get hit with custom charges, however if you opt for dhl posting you will get custom charges.

and realistically your looking at 14 too 21 days for delivery.

hope that's helpful.


+1
I buy from gearbest and others regularly, just select standard shipping.
#3
+1

Use standard delivery. Never use DHL as they use the import duty admin fee to subsidise their parcel service so you always pay it.
#4
My first quadcopter [XK Detect ] from Gearbest was just over £200 with £33 import duties . My second XK was £153 from Ali-Express and I paid no import duties. I buy loads of items , mainly elecrical and I now choose Ali-express .No duties and a very quick delivery.
#5
Love the folks posting how they saved a few quid buying from China . Great when all is fine :) Try returning something that doesn't work properly and that saving doesn't look so great oO . You can read on here how great Chinese sellers are , equally you can read how there is no EU warranty , returns are virtually impossible . You pays your money and take your chance . I buy cheap stuff from Hong Kong , Malaysia , China etc ( not much to go wrong with golf tees or similar !) But would I buy something for £200 -£300 or more ? No way Jose ! A fool and their money are soon parted - just to save a few quid - but probably lose the lot . Don't ever buy from China if you can't afford to write of the money you have paid !

Ok Paypal may help if you receive a duff item , but 6 months down the line when your sooper dooper Android phone corrupts or whatever where do you go ? errrr chuck it in the bin and buy the next one from an authorised EU dealer with an EU warranty much the wiser .
#6
In general: any use of expedited shipping will result in fees consisting of VAT on total cost inc delivery, plus the carrier's admin fee of typically £8+. If standard shipping is selected it is unlikely that any import fees will be charged, but still possible.
#7
rogparki
Love the folks posting how they saved a few quid buying from China . Great when all is fine :) Try returning something that doesn't work properly and that saving doesn't look so great oO . You can read on here how great Chinese sellers are , equally you can read how there is no EU warranty , returns are virtually impossible . You pays your money and take your chance . I buy cheap stuff from Hong Kong , Malaysia , China etc ( not much to go wrong with golf tees or similar !) But would I buy something for £200 -£300 or more ? No way Jose ! A fool and their money are soon parted - just to save a few quid - but probably lose the lot . Don't ever buy from China if you can't afford to write of the money you have paid !

Ok Paypal may help if you receive a duff item , but 6 months down the line when your sooper dooper Android phone corrupts or whatever where do you go ? errrr chuck it in the bin and buy the next one from an authorised EU dealer with an EU warranty much the wiser .
Bypass the majority of the doom and gloom on a £100+ single item by using a credit card to obtain S75 protection.
#8
AndyRoyd
rogparki
Love the folks posting how they saved a few quid buying from China . Great when all is fine :) Try returning something that doesn't work properly and that saving doesn't look so great oO . You can read on here how great Chinese sellers are , equally you can read how there is no EU warranty , returns are virtually impossible . You pays your money and take your chance . I buy cheap stuff from Hong Kong , Malaysia , China etc ( not much to go wrong with golf tees or similar !) But would I buy something for £200 -£300 or more ? No way Jose ! A fool and their money are soon parted - just to save a few quid - but probably lose the lot . Don't ever buy from China if you can't afford to write of the money you have paid !
Ok Paypal may help if you receive a duff item , but 6 months down the line when your sooper dooper Android phone corrupts or whatever where do you go ? errrr chuck it in the bin and buy the next one from an authorised EU dealer with an EU warranty much the wiser .
Bypass all the doom and gloom on a £100+ single item by using a credit card to obtain S75 protection.
Ah but you lose that if you pay through Paypal using your credit card . And as stated what happens 9 months down the line when your phone stops working for whatever reason ? No EU warranty , not feasible to return , S75 protection no good 9 months down the line .
#9
rogparki
AndyRoyd
rogparki
Love the folks posting how they saved a few quid buying from China . Great when all is fine :) Try returning something that doesn't work properly and that saving doesn't look so great oO . You can read on here how great Chinese sellers are , equally you can read how there is no EU warranty , returns are virtually impossible . You pays your money and take your chance . I buy cheap stuff from Hong Kong , Malaysia , China etc ( not much to go wrong with golf tees or similar !) But would I buy something for £200 -£300 or more ? No way Jose ! A fool and their money are soon parted - just to save a few quid - but probably lose the lot . Don't ever buy from China if you can't afford to write of the money you have paid !
Ok Paypal may help if you receive a duff item , but 6 months down the line when your sooper dooper Android phone corrupts or whatever where do you go ? errrr chuck it in the bin and buy the next one from an authorised EU dealer with an EU warranty much the wiser .
Bypass all the doom and gloom on a £100+ single item by using a credit card to obtain S75 protection.
Ah but you lose that if you pay through Paypal using your credit card . And as stated what happens 9 months down the line when your phone stops working for whatever reason ? No EU warranty , not feasible to return , S75 protection no good 9 months down the line .
Not looked at S75 t&c recently but I believe it obliges (obliged?) the credit card co to duplicate the warranty offered by the vendor at the time of sale. This is excellent if the vendor refuses to do anything about any warranty claim from the period of day1 right up until the end of the warranty period. Might be worth a revisit to check the terms.
#10
Thanks for all your answers, they answered my question! And rogparki, i completely understand where you're coming from as well so thank you for your opinion too, it's food for thought!
#11
On the reasonable assumption that the credible consumer website which.co.uk reflects current S75 legislation "the credit card company is jointly and severally liable for any breach of contract or misrepresentation by the retailer or trader. This means it is just as responsible as the retailer or trader for the goods or service supplied, allowing you to also put your claim to the credit card company."
http://www.which.co.uk/consumer-rights/regulation/section-75-of-the-consumer-credit-act
#12
AndyRoyd
On the reasonable assumption that the credible consumer website which.co.uk reflects current S75 legislation "the credit card company is jointly and severally liable for any breach of contract or misrepresentation by the retailer or trader. This means it is just as responsible as the retailer or trader for the goods or service supplied, allowing you to also put your claim to the credit card company."http://www.which.co.uk/consumer-rights/regulation/section-75-of-the-consumer-credit-act
Yes but if you use Paypal (via your card) there is no direct transaction between the card and the retailer so no S75 protection exists ( as folks found out last year when that travel company went bust ) . At least that the last I heard , anyway still no protection if the item is received as advertised but fails after say 9 months . Not saying you should - but if bought from Argos, Currys , John Lewis or (God forbid! ) etc and it failed after 9 months you would be able to get it sorted via the retailer or manufacturer . Buying form Hong Kong or China - No chance ! Just something to consider before "saving a few quid " .

Edited By: rogparki on Apr 17, 2017 20:56
#13
rogparki
AndyRoyd
On the reasonable assumption that the credible consumer website which.co.uk reflects current S75 legislation "the credit card company is jointly and severally liable for any breach of contract or misrepresentation by the retailer or trader. This means it is just as responsible as the retailer or trader for the goods or service supplied, allowing you to also put your claim to the credit card company."http://www.which.co.uk/consumer-rights/regulation/section-75-of-the-consumer-credit-act
Yes but if you use Paypal (via your card) there is no direct transaction between the card and the retailer so no S75 protection exists . At least that the last I heard , anyway still no protection if the item is received as advertised but fails after say 9 months . Not saying you should - but if bought from Argos, Currys , John Lewis or (God forbid! ) etc and it failed after 9 months you would be able to get it sorted via the retailer or manufacturer . Buying form Hong Kong or China - No chance ! Just something to consider before "saving a few quid " .
I suspect you may not have grasped the terms of S75 protection. If the retailer offers say a 2year warranty at the point of sale and the buyer uses a UK credit card to directly fund the purchase of an item of £100 or above, the credit card co assumes the same warranty obligation as the retailer. So for this example, from day1 until the end of 2years (including the random mention of 9months) the credit card co is jointly liable for the warranty. Simple interpretation means that it is actually in the favour of the buyer for the foreign retailer to not honour the warranty, because the credit card co will (which will likely be a simple full refund). HTH.
#14
AndyRoyd
rogparki
AndyRoyd
On the reasonable assumption that the credible consumer website which.co.uk reflects current S75 legislation "the credit card company is jointly and severally liable for any breach of contract or misrepresentation by the retailer or trader. This means it is just as responsible as the retailer or trader for the goods or service supplied, allowing you to also put your claim to the credit card company."http://www.which.co.uk/consumer-rights/regulation/section-75-of-the-consumer-credit-act
Yes but if you use Paypal (via your card) there is no direct transaction between the card and the retailer so no S75 protection exists . At least that the last I heard , anyway still no protection if the item is received as advertised but fails after say 9 months . Not saying you should - but if bought from Argos, Currys , John Lewis or (God forbid! ) etc and it failed after 9 months you would be able to get it sorted via the retailer or manufacturer . Buying form Hong Kong or China - No chance ! Just something to consider before "saving a few quid " .
I suspect you may not have grasped the terms of S75 protection. If the retailer offers say a 2year warranty at the point of sale and the buyer uses a UK credit card to directly fund the purchase of an item of £100 or above, the credit card co assumes the same warranty obligation as the retailer. So for this example, from day1 until the end of 2years (including the random mention of 9months) the credit card co is jointly liable for the warranty. Simple interpretation means that it is actually in the favour of the buyer for the foreign retailer to not honour the warranty, because the credit card co will (which will likely be a simple full refund). HTH.
This is great, fills me with confidence to purchase from there using a credit card. Very insightful, thank you!
#15
AndyRoyd
rogparki
AndyRoyd
On the reasonable assumption that the credible consumer website which.co.uk reflects current S75 legislation "the credit card company is jointly and severally liable for any breach of contract or misrepresentation by the retailer or trader. This means it is just as responsible as the retailer or trader for the goods or service supplied, allowing you to also put your claim to the credit card company."http://www.which.co.uk/consumer-rights/regulation/section-75-of-the-consumer-credit-act
Yes but if you use Paypal (via your card) there is no direct transaction between the card and the retailer so no S75 protection exists . At least that the last I heard , anyway still no protection if the item is received as advertised but fails after say 9 months . Not saying you should - but if bought from Argos, Currys , John Lewis or (God forbid! ) etc and it failed after 9 months you would be able to get it sorted via the retailer or manufacturer . Buying form Hong Kong or China - No chance ! Just something to consider before "saving a few quid " .
I suspect you may not have grasped the terms of S75 protection. If the retailer offers say a 2year warranty at the point of sale and the buyer uses a UK credit card to directly fund the purchase of an item of £100 or above, the credit card co assumes the same warranty obligation as the retailer. So for this example, from day1 until the end of 2years (including the random mention of 9months) the credit card co is jointly liable for the warranty. Simple interpretation means that it is actually in the favour of the buyer for the foreign retailer to not honour the warranty, because the credit card co will (which will likely be a simple full refund). HTH.
I will bow to your greater knowledge , never heard of that one , aside form Nationwide offering 12 months buyer protection as a "perk" as do Barclaycard (again as a "bonus") . I'll believe you as I certainly won't choose S75 as my bedtime reading tonight oO . 2 years free warranty if bought by credit card from anywhere in the world ? Would love to believe that were true - sadly I'm dubious , maybe other members who have successfully claimed could enlighten us further ?
#16
AndyRoyd
rogparki
AndyRoyd
On the reasonable assumption that the credible consumer website which.co.uk reflects current S75 legislation "the credit card company is jointly and severally liable for any breach of contract or misrepresentation by the retailer or trader. This means it is just as responsible as the retailer or trader for the goods or service supplied, allowing you to also put your claim to the credit card company."http://www.which.co.uk/consumer-rights/regulation/section-75-of-the-consumer-credit-act
Yes but if you use Paypal (via your card) there is no direct transaction between the card and the retailer so no S75 protection exists . At least that the last I heard , anyway still no protection if the item is received as advertised but fails after say 9 months . Not saying you should - but if bought from Argos, Currys , John Lewis or (God forbid! ) etc and it failed after 9 months you would be able to get it sorted via the retailer or manufacturer . Buying form Hong Kong or China - No chance ! Just something to consider before "saving a few quid " .
I suspect you may not have grasped the terms of S75 protection. If the retailer offers say a 2year warranty at the point of sale and the buyer uses a UK credit card to directly fund the purchase of an item of £100 or above, the credit card co assumes the same warranty obligation as the retailer. So for this example, from day1 until the end of 2years (including the random mention of 9months) the credit card co is jointly liable for the warranty. Simple interpretation means that it is actually in the favour of the buyer for the foreign retailer to not honour the warranty, because the credit card co will (which will likely be a simple full refund). HTH.
Had another thought , If the retailer offers no EU warranty (ie Bangood ,and similar Chinese sellers ) does a credit card offer a 2 year warranty nevertheless ?
#17
rogparki
AndyRoyd
rogparki
AndyRoyd
On the reasonable assumption that the credible consumer website which.co.uk reflects current S75 legislation "the credit card company is jointly and severally liable for any breach of contract or misrepresentation by the retailer or trader. This means it is just as responsible as the retailer or trader for the goods or service supplied, allowing you to also put your claim to the credit card company."http://www.which.co.uk/consumer-rights/regulation/section-75-of-the-consumer-credit-act
Yes but if you use Paypal (via your card) there is no direct transaction between the card and the retailer so no S75 protection exists . At least that the last I heard , anyway still no protection if the item is received as advertised but fails after say 9 months . Not saying you should - but if bought from Argos, Currys , John Lewis or (God forbid! ) etc and it failed after 9 months you would be able to get it sorted via the retailer or manufacturer . Buying form Hong Kong or China - No chance ! Just something to consider before "saving a few quid " .
I suspect you may not have grasped the terms of S75 protection. If the retailer offers say a 2year warranty at the point of sale and the buyer uses a UK credit card to directly fund the purchase of an item of £100 or above, the credit card co assumes the same warranty obligation as the retailer. So for this example, from day1 until the end of 2years (including the random mention of 9months) the credit card co is jointly liable for the warranty. Simple interpretation means that it is actually in the favour of the buyer for the foreign retailer to not honour the warranty, because the credit card co will (which will likely be a simple full refund). HTH.
Had another thought , If the retailer offers no EU warranty (ie Bangood ,and similar Chinese sellers ) does a credit card offer a 2 year warranty nevertheless ?
S75 protection assumed by the credit card co is the same warranty period stated by the retailer at the time of sale. If no warranty period is expressly stated, ask the retailer for confirmation of warranty applicable "if I make a purchase prior to dd mm yyyy."
#18
bcfc_bailey
AndyRoyd
rogparki
AndyRoyd
On the reasonable assumption that the credible consumer website which.co.uk reflects current S75 legislation "the credit card company is jointly and severally liable for any breach of contract or misrepresentation by the retailer or trader. This means it is just as responsible as the retailer or trader for the goods or service supplied, allowing you to also put your claim to the credit card company."http://www.which.co.uk/consumer-rights/regulation/section-75-of-the-consumer-credit-act
Yes but if you use Paypal (via your card) there is no direct transaction between the card and the retailer so no S75 protection exists . At least that the last I heard , anyway still no protection if the item is received as advertised but fails after say 9 months . Not saying you should - but if bought from Argos, Currys , John Lewis or (God forbid! ) etc and it failed after 9 months you would be able to get it sorted via the retailer or manufacturer . Buying form Hong Kong or China - No chance ! Just something to consider before "saving a few quid " .
I suspect you may not have grasped the terms of S75 protection. If the retailer offers say a 2year warranty at the point of sale and the buyer uses a UK credit card to directly fund the purchase of an item of £100 or above, the credit card co assumes the same warranty obligation as the retailer. So for this example, from day1 until the end of 2years (including the random mention of 9months) the credit card co is jointly liable for the warranty. Simple interpretation means that it is actually in the favour of the buyer for the foreign retailer to not honour the warranty, because the credit card co will (which will likely be a simple full refund). HTH.
This is great, fills me with confidence to purchase from there using a credit card. Very insightful, thank you!
Any decision is probably best based on your requirements and comparison. PayPal payment will provide reasonble protection for 180days from date of the transaction and include some contribution towards any return postage costs during that period, but zero assistance of any sort beyond 180days; this is perfect if you are the sort of person who changes devices every five months or less. Compare to direct credit card payment S75 protection that will effectively provide cover for the full warranty period stated at point of sale, but will provide zero contribution towards any return postage should the retailer be amenable to a warranty claim (hence the hope that the retailer will shun any warranty claim!).
#19
AndyRoyd
rogparki
AndyRoyd
rogparki
AndyRoyd
On the reasonable assumption that the credible consumer website which.co.uk reflects current S75 legislation "the credit card company is jointly and severally liable for any breach of contract or misrepresentation by the retailer or trader. This means it is just as responsible as the retailer or trader for the goods or service supplied, allowing you to also put your claim to the credit card company."http://www.which.co.uk/consumer-rights/regulation/section-75-of-the-consumer-credit-act
Yes but if you use Paypal (via your card) there is no direct transaction between the card and the retailer so no S75 protection exists . At least that the last I heard , anyway still no protection if the item is received as advertised but fails after say 9 months . Not saying you should - but if bought from Argos, Currys , John Lewis or (God forbid! ) etc and it failed after 9 months you would be able to get it sorted via the retailer or manufacturer . Buying form Hong Kong or China - No chance ! Just something to consider before "saving a few quid " .
I suspect you may not have grasped the terms of S75 protection. If the retailer offers say a 2year warranty at the point of sale and the buyer uses a UK credit card to directly fund the purchase of an item of £100 or above, the credit card co assumes the same warranty obligation as the retailer. So for this example, from day1 until the end of 2years (including the random mention of 9months) the credit card co is jointly liable for the warranty. Simple interpretation means that it is actually in the favour of the buyer for the foreign retailer to not honour the warranty, because the credit card co will (which will likely be a simple full refund). HTH.
Had another thought , If the retailer offers no EU warranty (ie Bangood ,and similar Chinese sellers ) does a credit card offer a 2 year warranty nevertheless ?
S75 protection assumed by the credit card co is the same warranty period stated by the retailer at the time of sale. If no warranty period is expressly stated, ask the retailer for confirmation of warranty applicable "if I make a purchase prior to dd mm yyyy."
Really hope you are right as you have told the community that they have warranty when paying by credit card from anywhere in the world . My understanding was that the protection was only for goods not received or received not as described or damaged . I'll leave it there (unlike many on here I don't comment on things I'm not certain about) . You seem sure of your facts , fair enough , but be ready for a deluge of questions from members who will be wanting to make claims based upon your interpretation of S75 .
#20
rogparki
AndyRoyd
rogparki
AndyRoyd
rogparki
[quote=AndyRoyd] On the reasonable assumption that the credible consumer website which.co.uk reflects current S75 legislation "the credit card company is jointly and severally liable for any breach of contract or misrepresentation by the retailer or trader. This means it is just as responsible as the retailer or trader for the goods or service supplied, allowing you to also put your claim to the credit card company."http://www.which.co.uk/consumer-rights/regulation/section-75-of-the-consumer-credit-act
Yes but if you use Paypal (via your card) there is no direct transaction between the card and the retailer so no S75 protection exists . At least that the last I heard , anyway still no protection if the item is received as advertised but fails after say 9 months . Not saying you should - but if bought from Argos, Currys , John Lewis or (God forbid! ) etc and it failed after 9 months you would be able to get it sorted via the retailer or manufacturer . Buying form Hong Kong or China - No chance ! Just something to consider before "saving a few quid " .
I suspect you may not have grasped the terms of S75 protection. If the retailer offers say a 2year warranty at the point of sale and the buyer uses a UK credit card to directly fund the purchase of an item of £100 or above, the credit card co assumes the same warranty obligation as the retailer. So for this example, from day1 until the end of 2years (including the random mention of 9months) the credit card co is jointly liable for the warranty. Simple interpretation means that it is actually in the favour of the buyer for the foreign retailer to not honour the warranty, because the credit card co will (which will likely be a simple full refund). HTH.
Had another thought , If the retailer offers no EU warranty (ie Bangood ,and similar Chinese sellers ) does a credit card offer a 2 year warranty nevertheless ?
S75 protection assumed by the credit card co is the same warranty period stated by the retailer at the time of sale. If no warranty period is expressly stated, ask the retailer for confirmation of warranty applicable "if I make a purchase prior to dd mm yyyy."
Really hope you are right as you have told the community that they have warranty when paying by credit card from anywhere in the world . My understanding was that the protection was only for goods not received or received not as described or damaged . I'll leave it there (unlike many on here I don't comment on things I'm not certain about) . You seem sure of your facts , fair enough , but be ready for a deluge of questions from members who will be wanting to make claims based upon your interpretation of S75 . I'm afraid Urban myths have a habit of backfiring on HUKD .
#21
rogparki
rogparki
AndyRoyd
rogparki
AndyRoyd
rogparki
[quote=AndyRoyd] On the reasonable assumption that the credible consumer website which.co.uk reflects current S75 legislation "the credit card company is jointly and severally liable for any breach of contract or misrepresentation by the retailer or trader. This means it is just as responsible as the retailer or trader for the goods or service supplied, allowing you to also put your claim to the credit card company."http://www.which.co.uk/consumer-rights/regulation/section-75-of-the-consumer-credit-act
Yes but if you use Paypal (via your card) there is no direct transaction between the card and the retailer so no S75 protection exists . At least that the last I heard , anyway still no protection if the item is received as advertised but fails after say 9 months . Not saying you should - but if bought from Argos, Currys , John Lewis or (God forbid! ) etc and it failed after 9 months you would be able to get it sorted via the retailer or manufacturer . Buying form Hong Kong or China - No chance ! Just something to consider before "saving a few quid " .
I suspect you may not have grasped the terms of S75 protection. If the retailer offers say a 2year warranty at the point of sale and the buyer uses a UK credit card to directly fund the purchase of an item of £100 or above, the credit card co assumes the same warranty obligation as the retailer. So for this example, from day1 until the end of 2years (including the random mention of 9months) the credit card co is jointly liable for the warranty. Simple interpretation means that it is actually in the favour of the buyer for the foreign retailer to not honour the warranty, because the credit card co will (which will likely be a simple full refund). HTH.
Had another thought , If the retailer offers no EU warranty (ie Bangood ,and similar Chinese sellers ) does a credit card offer a 2 year warranty nevertheless ?
S75 protection assumed by the credit card co is the same warranty period stated by the retailer at the time of sale. If no warranty period is expressly stated, ask the retailer for confirmation of warranty applicable "if I make a purchase prior to dd mm yyyy."
Really hope you are right as you have told the community that they have warranty when paying by credit card from anywhere in the world . My understanding was that the protection was only for goods not received or received not as described or damaged . I'll leave it there (unlike many on here I don't comment on things I'm not certain about) . You seem sure of your facts , fair enough , but be ready for a deluge of questions from members who will be wanting to make claims based upon your interpretation of S75 . I'm afraid Urban myths have a habit of backfiring on HUKD .
No myth with the actual legislation at http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1974/39/section/75
The "easyread" interpretation is provided at
http://www.moneysavingexpert.com/shopping/section75-protect-your-purchases
and
http://www.which.co.uk/consumer-rights/regulation/section-75-of-the-consumer-credit-act (subject to HUKD not applying a corrupting affiliate URL)
#23
rogparki
rogparki
AndyRoyd
rogparki
AndyRoyd
rogparki
[quote=AndyRoyd] On the reasonable assumption that the credible consumer website which.co.uk reflects current S75 legislation "the credit card company is jointly and severally liable for any breach of contract or misrepresentation by the retailer or trader. This means it is just as responsible as the retailer or trader for the goods or service supplied, allowing you to also put your claim to the credit card company."http://www.which.co.uk/consumer-rights/regulation/section-75-of-the-consumer-credit-act
Yes but if you use Paypal (via your card) there is no direct transaction between the card and the retailer so no S75 protection exists . At least that the last I heard , anyway still no protection if the item is received as advertised but fails after say 9 months . Not saying you should - but if bought from Argos, Currys , John Lewis or (God forbid! ) etc and it failed after 9 months you would be able to get it sorted via the retailer or manufacturer . Buying form Hong Kong or China - No chance ! Just something to consider before "saving a few quid " .
I suspect you may not have grasped the terms of S75 protection. If the retailer offers say a 2year warranty at the point of sale and the buyer uses a UK credit card to directly fund the purchase of an item of £100 or above, the credit card co assumes the same warranty obligation as the retailer. So for this example, from day1 until the end of 2years (including the random mention of 9months) the credit card co is jointly liable for the warranty. Simple interpretation means that it is actually in the favour of the buyer for the foreign retailer to not honour the warranty, because the credit card co will (which will likely be a simple full refund). HTH.
Had another thought , If the retailer offers no EU warranty (ie Bangood ,and similar Chinese sellers ) does a credit card offer a 2 year warranty nevertheless ?
S75 protection assumed by the credit card co is the same warranty period stated by the retailer at the time of sale. If no warranty period is expressly stated, ask the retailer for confirmation of warranty applicable "if I make a purchase prior to dd mm yyyy."
Really hope you are right as you have told the community that they have warranty when paying by credit card from anywhere in the world . My understanding was that the protection was only for goods not received or received not as described or damaged . I'll leave it there (unlike many on here I don't comment on things I'm not certain about) . You seem sure of your facts , fair enough , but be ready for a deluge of questions from members who will be wanting to make claims based upon your interpretation of S75 . I'm afraid Urban myths have a habit of backfiring on HUKD .
There's an interesting section on MSE that actually encourages the buyer not to bother contact the foreign vendor when a warranty claim is required:
"Are overseas and web purchases protected?
Yes. This used to be a hot potato, when this got to the Court of Appeal and it confirmed this applies to everything you buy. Whether it’s in the UK, abroad or on a foreign website, Section 75 applies.
This is a real boon, as often if you buy something using a credit card abroad it’s much more difficult to get in touch with the retailer. So don’t bother, simply make a claim directly against the card company."

The above is listed in the FAQ section at http://www.moneysavingexpert.com/shopping/section75-protect-your-purchases
#24
AndyRoyd
rogparki
rogparki
AndyRoyd
rogparki
AndyRoyd
rogparki
[quote=AndyRoyd] On the reasonable assumption that the credible consumer website which.co.uk reflects current S75 legislation "the credit card company is jointly and severally liable for any breach of contract or misrepresentation by the retailer or trader. This means it is just as responsible as the retailer or trader for the goods or service supplied, allowing you to also put your claim to the credit card company."http://www.which.co.uk/consumer-rights/regulation/section-75-of-the-consumer-credit-act
Yes but if you use Paypal (via your card) there is no direct transaction between the card and the retailer so no S75 protection exists . At least that the last I heard , anyway still no protection if the item is received as advertised but fails after say 9 months . Not saying you should - but if bought from Argos, Currys , John Lewis or (God forbid! ) etc and it failed after 9 months you would be able to get it sorted via the retailer or manufacturer . Buying form Hong Kong or China - No chance ! Just something to consider before "saving a few quid " .
I suspect you may not have grasped the terms of S75 protection. If the retailer offers say a 2year warranty at the point of sale and the buyer uses a UK credit card to directly fund the purchase of an item of £100 or above, the credit card co assumes the same warranty obligation as the retailer. So for this example, from day1 until the end of 2years (including the random mention of 9months) the credit card co is jointly liable for the warranty. Simple interpretation means that it is actually in the favour of the buyer for the foreign retailer to not honour the warranty, because the credit card co will (which will likely be a simple full refund). HTH.
Had another thought , If the retailer offers no EU warranty (ie Bangood ,and similar Chinese sellers ) does a credit card offer a 2 year warranty nevertheless ?
S75 protection assumed by the credit card co is the same warranty period stated by the retailer at the time of sale. If no warranty period is expressly stated, ask the retailer for confirmation of warranty applicable "if I make a purchase prior to dd mm yyyy."
Really hope you are right as you have told the community that they have warranty when paying by credit card from anywhere in the world . My understanding was that the protection was only for goods not received or received not as described or damaged . I'll leave it there (unlike many on here I don't comment on things I'm not certain about) . You seem sure of your facts , fair enough , but be ready for a deluge of questions from members who will be wanting to make claims based upon your interpretation of S75 . I'm afraid Urban myths have a habit of backfiring on HUKD .
No myth with the actual legislation at http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1974/39/section/75
The "easyread" interpretation is provided athttp://www.moneysavingexpert.com/shopping/section75-protect-your-purchases
andhttp://www.which.co.uk/consumer-rights/regulation/section-75-of-the-consumer-credit-act (subject to HUKD not applying a corrupting affiliate URL)
Again its not my preferred bedtime reading , but I see nothing there that implies any warranty ? Yes it if doesn't arrive , its broken , not fit for purpose etc you are covered I accept that and that has always been my understanding . You have stated that S75 gives the buyer ,using a credit card , a warranty ? Possibly , but only if the seller gives a warranty (as part of the purchase) and then goes bust . Would that be correct ? Otherwise no warranty is given by the credit card purchase .

You can see that the HUKD sheep have been voting your statements "Up" and mine "Down" as yours are those they "Hope" are true - which is pretty misleading for all who are daft enough to take notice of such things .

Can you confirm that your statement that "purchase by credit card gives a warranty " or words to that effect only applies if the retailer were to go bust and that the S75 protection in effect applies only to receiving a valid ,working purchase and does not cover you down the line . Bangood and similar Hongkong/Chinese companies require you to send the item back to them (tracked at your considerable expense -believe currently £50 -£60 for a phone ) then await , a few months later their response and action . Unless I am mistaken you have no claim on the Card company for this ,although it would be interesting (and expensive) to run a test case for the return of the £50 odd postage cost . I think for the benefit of some members you may wish to clarify your earlier statements .
#25
Its just a shame members don't take an interest in important polite discussions such as this one . Many members must have had experiences good and bad with Far Eastern sellers and maybe resultant S75 or Paypal claims successful or not , and particularly anyone who has any luck with a warranty claim via their credit card . I personally wouldn't dream of spending over £20 on a Chinese item every time I'd pay a few quid extra and buy from a UK retailer at least the I know where I stand .

There are a lot of theories, interpretations and urban myths regarding the extent of buyer protection . Me ,I'll need far more concrete proof before spending my hard earned dosh on a ,say, £300 phone that may stop working after 9 months . Bought from Currys, JL etc I know my rights - from Bangood ? your guess is as good as mine .
#26
rogparki
AndyRoyd
rogparki
rogparki
AndyRoyd
rogparki
AndyRoyd
rogparki
[quote=AndyRoyd] On the reasonable assumption that the credible consumer website which.co.uk reflects current S75 legislation "the credit card company is jointly and severally liable for any breach of contract or misrepresentation by the retailer or trader. This means it is just as responsible as the retailer or trader for the goods or service supplied, allowing you to also put your claim to the credit card company."http://www.which.co.uk/consumer-rights/regulation/section-75-of-the-consumer-credit-act
Yes but if you use Paypal (via your card) there is no direct transaction between the card and the retailer so no S75 protection exists . At least that the last I heard , anyway still no protection if the item is received as advertised but fails after say 9 months . Not saying you should - but if bought from Argos, Currys , John Lewis or (God forbid! ) etc and it failed after 9 months you would be able to get it sorted via the retailer or manufacturer . Buying form Hong Kong or China - No chance ! Just something to consider before "saving a few quid " .
I suspect you may not have grasped the terms of S75 protection. If the retailer offers say a 2year warranty at the point of sale and the buyer uses a UK credit card to directly fund the purchase of an item of £100 or above, the credit card co assumes the same warranty obligation as the retailer. So for this example, from day1 until the end of 2years (including the random mention of 9months) the credit card co is jointly liable for the warranty. Simple interpretation means that it is actually in the favour of the buyer for the foreign retailer to not honour the warranty, because the credit card co will (which will likely be a simple full refund). HTH.
Had another thought , If the retailer offers no EU warranty (ie Bangood ,and similar Chinese sellers ) does a credit card offer a 2 year warranty nevertheless ?
S75 protection assumed by the credit card co is the same warranty period stated by the retailer at the time of sale. If no warranty period is expressly stated, ask the retailer for confirmation of warranty applicable "if I make a purchase prior to dd mm yyyy."
Really hope you are right as you have told the community that they have warranty when paying by credit card from anywhere in the world . My understanding was that the protection was only for goods not received or received not as described or damaged . I'll leave it there (unlike many on here I don't comment on things I'm not certain about) . You seem sure of your facts , fair enough , but be ready for a deluge of questions from members who will be wanting to make claims based upon your interpretation of S75 . I'm afraid Urban myths have a habit of backfiring on HUKD .
No myth with the actual legislation at http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1974/39/section/75
The "easyread" interpretation is provided athttp://www.moneysavingexpert.com/shopping/section75-protect-your-purchases
andhttp://www.which.co.uk/consumer-rights/regulation/section-75-of-the-consumer-credit-act (subject to HUKD not applying a corrupting affiliate URL)
Again its not my preferred bedtime reading , but I see nothing there that implies any warranty ? Yes it if doesn't arrive , its broken , not fit for purpose etc you are covered I accept that and that has always been my understanding . You have stated that S75 gives the buyer ,using a credit card , a warranty ? Possibly , but only if the seller gives a warranty (as part of the purchase) and then goes bust . Would that be correct ? Otherwise no warranty is given by the credit card purchase .
You can see that the HUKD sheep have been voting your statements "Up" and mine "Down" as yours are those they "Hope" are true - which is pretty misleading for all who are daft enough to take notice of such things .
Can you confirm that your statement that "purchase by credit card gives a warranty " or words to that effect only applies if the retailer were to go bust and that the S75 protection in effect applies only to receiving a valid ,working purchase and does not cover you down the line . Bangood and similar Hongkong/Chinese companies require you to send the item back to them (tracked at your considerable expense -believe currently £50 -£60 for a phone ) then await , a few months later their response and action . Unless I am mistaken you have no claim on the Card company for this ,although it would be interesting (and expensive) to run a test case for the return of the £50 odd postage cost . I think for the benefit of some members you may wish to clarify your earlier statements .
The phrases you need to look at lifted directly from the legislation are "breach of contract" and "jointly and severally liable to the debtor" where breach of contract applies to any specification / promises made by the vendor (e.g. this device has xxGB of RAM; yy months warranty; will increase the size of your appendage by zz) and jointly and severally means, well: jointly and severally.
#27
AndyRoyd
rogparki
AndyRoyd
rogparki
rogparki
AndyRoyd
rogparki
AndyRoyd
rogparki
[quote=AndyRoyd] On the reasonable assumption that the credible consumer website which.co.uk reflects current S75 legislation "the credit card company is jointly and severally liable for any breach of contract or misrepresentation by the retailer or trader. This means it is just as responsible as the retailer or trader for the goods or service supplied, allowing you to also put your claim to the credit card company."http://www.which.co.uk/consumer-rights/regulation/section-75-of-the-consumer-credit-act
Yes but if you use Paypal (via your card) there is no direct transaction between the card and the retailer so no S75 protection exists . At least that the last I heard , anyway still no protection if the item is received as advertised but fails after say 9 months . Not saying you should - but if bought from Argos, Currys , John Lewis or (God forbid! ) etc and it failed after 9 months you would be able to get it sorted via the retailer or manufacturer . Buying form Hong Kong or China - No chance ! Just something to consider before "saving a few quid " .
I suspect you may not have grasped the terms of S75 protection. If the retailer offers say a 2year warranty at the point of sale and the buyer uses a UK credit card to directly fund the purchase of an item of £100 or above, the credit card co assumes the same warranty obligation as the retailer. So for this example, from day1 until the end of 2years (including the random mention of 9months) the credit card co is jointly liable for the warranty. Simple interpretation means that it is actually in the favour of the buyer for the foreign retailer to not honour the warranty, because the credit card co will (which will likely be a simple full refund). HTH.
Had another thought , If the retailer offers no EU warranty (ie Bangood ,and similar Chinese sellers ) does a credit card offer a 2 year warranty nevertheless ?
S75 protection assumed by the credit card co is the same warranty period stated by the retailer at the time of sale. If no warranty period is expressly stated, ask the retailer for confirmation of warranty applicable "if I make a purchase prior to dd mm yyyy."
Really hope you are right as you have told the community that they have warranty when paying by credit card from anywhere in the world . My understanding was that the protection was only for goods not received or received not as described or damaged . I'll leave it there (unlike many on here I don't comment on things I'm not certain about) . You seem sure of your facts , fair enough , but be ready for a deluge of questions from members who will be wanting to make claims based upon your interpretation of S75 . I'm afraid Urban myths have a habit of backfiring on HUKD .
No myth with the actual legislation at http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1974/39/section/75
The "easyread" interpretation is provided athttp://www.moneysavingexpert.com/shopping/section75-protect-your-purchases
andhttp://www.which.co.uk/consumer-rights/regulation/section-75-of-the-consumer-credit-act (subject to HUKD not applying a corrupting affiliate URL)
Again its not my preferred bedtime reading , but I see nothing there that implies any warranty ? Yes it if doesn't arrive , its broken , not fit for purpose etc you are covered I accept that and that has always been my understanding . You have stated that S75 gives the buyer ,using a credit card , a warranty ? Possibly , but only if the seller gives a warranty (as part of the purchase) and then goes bust . Would that be correct ? Otherwise no warranty is given by the credit card purchase .
You can see that the HUKD sheep have been voting your statements "Up" and mine "Down" as yours are those they "Hope" are true - which is pretty misleading for all who are daft enough to take notice of such things .
Can you confirm that your statement that "purchase by credit card gives a warranty " or words to that effect only applies if the retailer were to go bust and that the S75 protection in effect applies only to receiving a valid ,working purchase and does not cover you down the line . Bangood and similar Hongkong/Chinese companies require you to send the item back to them (tracked at your considerable expense -believe currently £50 -£60 for a phone ) then await , a few months later their response and action . Unless I am mistaken you have no claim on the Card company for this ,although it would be interesting (and expensive) to run a test case for the return of the £50 odd postage cost . I think for the benefit of some members you may wish to clarify your earlier statements .
The phrases you need to look at lifted directly from the legislation are "breach of contract" and "jointly and severally liable to the debtor" where breach of contract applies to any specification / promises made by the vendor (e.g. this device has xxGB of RAM; yy months warranty; will increase the size of your appendage by zz) and jointly and severally means, well: jointly and severally.
Yes but that's on receipt - not as described , not received , damaged etc , We all know about that protection . My problem is that it doesn't help you a few months down the line when the updates crash it or it just stops working . You implied on an earlier post that you have warranty protection via the credit card company - as far as I can see this is only true if a warranty was offered by a company which has gone bust . Bangood , Ali express etc wont go bust but at best it will cost you £50 return postage and a couple of months of waiting to get your problem addressed and probably longer to get a replacement . Credit card protection will do nothing to expedite this . You see what I'm getting at ? You'd just better hope your cheapish Chinese purchase continues to work as it should ,otherwise after a few months you are b** g *d - I mean not very happy :|
#28
rogparki
AndyRoyd
rogparki
AndyRoyd
rogparki
rogparki
AndyRoyd
rogparki
AndyRoyd
rogparki
[quote=AndyRoyd] On the reasonable assumption that the credible consumer website which.co.uk reflects current S75 legislation "the credit card company is jointly and severally liable for any breach of contract or misrepresentation by the retailer or trader. This means it is just as responsible as the retailer or trader for the goods or service supplied, allowing you to also put your claim to the credit card company."http://www.which.co.uk/consumer-rights/regulation/section-75-of-the-consumer-credit-act
Yes but if you use Paypal (via your card) there is no direct transaction between the card and the retailer so no S75 protection exists . At least that the last I heard , anyway still no protection if the item is received as advertised but fails after say 9 months . Not saying you should - but if bought from Argos, Currys , John Lewis or (God forbid! ) etc and it failed after 9 months you would be able to get it sorted via the retailer or manufacturer . Buying form Hong Kong or China - No chance ! Just something to consider before "saving a few quid " .
I suspect you may not have grasped the terms of S75 protection. If the retailer offers say a 2year warranty at the point of sale and the buyer uses a UK credit card to directly fund the purchase of an item of £100 or above, the credit card co assumes the same warranty obligation as the retailer. So for this example, from day1 until the end of 2years (including the random mention of 9months) the credit card co is jointly liable for the warranty. Simple interpretation means that it is actually in the favour of the buyer for the foreign retailer to not honour the warranty, because the credit card co will (which will likely be a simple full refund). HTH.
Had another thought , If the retailer offers no EU warranty (ie Bangood ,and similar Chinese sellers ) does a credit card offer a 2 year warranty nevertheless ?
S75 protection assumed by the credit card co is the same warranty period stated by the retailer at the time of sale. If no warranty period is expressly stated, ask the retailer for confirmation of warranty applicable "if I make a purchase prior to dd mm yyyy."
Really hope you are right as you have told the community that they have warranty when paying by credit card from anywhere in the world . My understanding was that the protection was only for goods not received or received not as described or damaged . I'll leave it there (unlike many on here I don't comment on things I'm not certain about) . You seem sure of your facts , fair enough , but be ready for a deluge of questions from members who will be wanting to make claims based upon your interpretation of S75 . I'm afraid Urban myths have a habit of backfiring on HUKD .
No myth with the actual legislation at http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1974/39/section/75
The "easyread" interpretation is provided athttp://www.moneysavingexpert.com/shopping/section75-protect-your-purchases
andhttp://www.which.co.uk/consumer-rights/regulation/section-75-of-the-consumer-credit-act (subject to HUKD not applying a corrupting affiliate URL)
Again its not my preferred bedtime reading , but I see nothing there that implies any warranty ? Yes it if doesn't arrive , its broken , not fit for purpose etc you are covered I accept that and that has always been my understanding . You have stated that S75 gives the buyer ,using a credit card , a warranty ? Possibly , but only if the seller gives a warranty (as part of the purchase) and then goes bust . Would that be correct ? Otherwise no warranty is given by the credit card purchase .
You can see that the HUKD sheep have been voting your statements "Up" and mine "Down" as yours are those they "Hope" are true - which is pretty misleading for all who are daft enough to take notice of such things .
Can you confirm that your statement that "purchase by credit card gives a warranty " or words to that effect only applies if the retailer were to go bust and that the S75 protection in effect applies only to receiving a valid ,working purchase and does not cover you down the line . Bangood and similar Hongkong/Chinese companies require you to send the item back to them (tracked at your considerable expense -believe currently £50 -£60 for a phone ) then await , a few months later their response and action . Unless I am mistaken you have no claim on the Card company for this ,although it would be interesting (and expensive) to run a test case for the return of the £50 odd postage cost . I think for the benefit of some members you may wish to clarify your earlier statements .
The phrases you need to look at lifted directly from the legislation are "breach of contract" and "jointly and severally liable to the debtor" where breach of contract applies to any specification / promises made by the vendor (e.g. this device has xxGB of RAM; yy months warranty; will increase the size of your appendage by zz) and jointly and severally means, well: jointly and severally.
Yes but that's on receipt - not as described , not received , damaged etc , We all know about that protection . My problem is that it doesn't help you a few months down the line when the updates crash it or it just stops working . You implied on an earlier post that you have warranty protection via the credit card company - as far as I can see this is only true if a warranty was offered by a company which has gone bust . Bangood , Ali express etc wont go bust but at best it will cost you £50 return postage and a couple of months of waiting to get your problem addressed and probably longer to get a replacement . Credit card protection will do nothing to expedite this . You see what I'm getting at ? You'd just better hope your cheapish Chinese purchase continues to work as it should ,otherwise after a few months you are b** g *d - I mean not very happy :|
I appreciate there is an element of legal terminology here, but breach of contract covers any items included in the purchase and is not time-limited. So, for example, if the vendor offered a one year warranty, or two year warranty, or three year warranty, and the £100+ purchase funded directly via credit card was in need of a genuine warranty claim within whatever period was quoted at the time of purchase, the credit card co is jointly and severally liable to service the warranty. So if even if the foreign vendor showed an interest in servicing a warranty claim, just tell the credit card co that you expect them (the credit card co) to assume its joint S75 obligations and provide the warranty service as stated at point of sale.
#29
Christ , there is some rubbish put on here .............I mean about folk saying they shouldn't buy from China . Most of the stuff you buy in the UK is from China . I've bought tons of items from GB , Banggood and Ali-express over the years and I've had no trouble . Never needed to return anything , probably couldn't anyway , but nothing's been faulty .
If you look at most of the electrical stuff [the stuff I buy] on ebay , it's mainly from China but the sellers have probably bought multiple items from Banggood and are just selling it on at a profit . I will buy direct from these company's at a fraction of the cost . I dont sell it on by the way , it's for my own use. So, dont knock it ,till you try it.
#30
Hi guys, I am planning to buy a building blocks set which costs around £60 from aliexpress. The price is £59 with standard delivery and £62 with DHL. Whats the best way to buy this without having to pay import duties?

Post an Answer

You don't need an account to leave a response. Just enter your email address. We'll keep it private.

...OR log in with your social account

...OR comment using your social account

Thanks for your comment! Keep it up!
We just need to have a quick look and it will be live soon.
The community is happy to hear your opinion! Keep contributing!