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Last 4 numbers on a debit card

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This has bugged me someone will know the answer. Why is it the long number on a debit card the bank only change the last 4 numbers, yet that's the only numbers printed on a receipt. Read More
Standi Avatar
8m, 1w agoPosted 8 months, 1 week ago
This has bugged me someone will know the answer.

Why is it the long number on a debit card the bank only change the last 4 numbers, yet that's the only numbers printed on a receipt.
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Standi Avatar
8m, 1w agoPosted 8 months, 1 week ago
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#1
If they printed the first four numbers, then you wouldn't be able to identify which card you were using. Because as you say they are the same. I think that is the purpose of printing them on a receipt.

From a security point of view, I have no idea! It winds me up too. Because of things like this:

https://www.wired.com/2012/08/apple-amazon-mat-honan-hacking/
#2
first 4 I'd the type like visa or Mastercard and credit or debit the rest I'd the account the last 4 aren't unique so r shown
#3
The 1st 6 are known as the BIN, that tells the terminal which bank to route the transaction to, the next 9 digits are the unique account identifier and the last digit is a check sum to make sure the card number is correct.

You can't calculate the full card number from just the last 4 digits and these digits are most likely to be unique.
#4
Thanks for the answers,
#5
dcx_badass
My last mastercard was identical except the dates and cvv, was weird as I've never not had different last four digits on a new card before.
2 ways of doing it. Either digit 15 increases by 1 which also means character 16 also changes.
Or, the bank reuses the same PAN (card number) but increments a chip tag called the pan sequence number and the cvv on the rear of the card then changes.
All depends how the banks systems are setup.

Edited By: paul1005 on Sep 14, 2016 21:31
#6
Paul1005 spot on with the answer . The first six are the bin and that identifies the bank and the type of card . It's the rest of these number which is unique to your account . The cvv on my current debit card is 000 which raises a few eyebrows . Not telling you the other 16 digits though
#7
i think the last 4 are printed to help you identify which card was used for that transaction. they need something - if you got home from a night out with 2 CCs and a debit card and 6 bar receipts, you will soon know which cards took a hammering! as has been said, the early numbers are like area codes - common to certain banks/card types (e.g. sometimes I type in the digits and it soon knows it's a master card CC for example)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Payment_card_number

this is the easy bit.
I still can't get my head around those card readers you need to sign/respond to sign in/add payee to OLB. what the how do they work?!?!?! (have read an explanation and still don't fully get it)

I think my replacement cards (mainly replaced from wear and tear rather than expiry) have been identical numbers, just expiry and CVV changes.
#8
Standi

This has bugged me someone will know the answer.
Why is it the long number on a debit card the bank only change the last 4 numbers, yet that's the only numbers printed on a receipt.

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