learning programmes (pre school) phonetics. literacy maths. what would you advise? - HotUKDeals
We use cookie files to improve site functionality and personalisation. By continuing to use HotUKDeals, you accept our cookie and privacy policy.
Get the HotUKDeals app free at Google Play

Search Error

An error occurred when searching, please try again!

Login / Sign UpSubmit

learning programmes (pre school) phonetics. literacy maths. what would you advise?

£0.00 @
rather then enrolling my son into education centre which uses progs such as pearons SuccessMaker etc are these worth buying and doing at home? any alternartive progs thanks Read More
wakkaday Avatar
3m, 1w agoPosted 3 months, 1 week ago
rather then enrolling my son into education centre which uses progs such as pearons SuccessMaker etc are these worth buying and doing at home? any alternartive progs

thanks
Tags:
wakkaday Avatar
3m, 1w agoPosted 3 months, 1 week ago
Options

All Responses

(13) Jump to unreadPost an answer
Responses/page:
#1
My son was taught using "jolly phonics" easily found on you tube etc
#2
They use jolly phonics in school and you can buy the workbooks to go with the yiu tube video.
also my son's nursery teacher recommended the award winning "teach your monster to read" app.
#3
readingeggs.co.uk
#4
Ruth miskins. jolly phonics. and the best thing is that I have taught all my children their phonics from the age of 12- 18 month using actions. my eldest 2 went to nursery being able to read.
#5
hairy letters app is great, reception teacher recommended it, then there is hairy phones 1 and 2 to move onto aswell.
#6
Just out of interest, does anyone know if starting formal education this early benefits a child? I could read at an early age and I know my younger sister was reading at the age of three because all the rest of the family were reading. My own son has learning difficulties so he didn't read and write till he was at school and I remember it being hard going. It still is. Most European countries start formal education much later than we do yet other countries seem to "hothouse" kids into learning at a very early age. Is there any evidence as to which system benefits the child long term?
#7
psychobitchfromhell
Just out of interest, does anyone know if starting formal education this early benefits a child? I could read at an early age and I know my younger sister was reading at the age of three because all the rest of the family were reading. My own son has learning difficulties so he didn't read and write till he was at school and I remember it being hard going. It still is. Most European countries start formal education much later than we do yet other countries seem to "hothouse" kids into learning at a very early age. Is there any evidence as to which system benefits the child long term?


a very good point... there seems to be lot of pressure. i personally feel kids will learn in their own time and should not be compared
#8
read write inc.


psychobitchfromhell
Just out of interest, does anyone know if starting formal education this early benefits a child? I could read at an early age and I know my younger sister was reading at the age of three because all the rest of the family were reading. My own son has learning difficulties so he didn't read and write till he was at school and I remember it being hard going. It still is. Most European countries start formal education much later than we do yet other countries seem to "hothouse" kids into learning at a very early age. Is there any evidence as to which system benefits the child long term?

Sweden lead the literacy tables in Europe. Despite children starting formal education 2 years later than those in the UK.
#9
Paddy_o_furniture
read write inc.
psychobitchfromhell
Just out of interest, does anyone know if starting formal education this early benefits a child? I could read at an early age and I know my younger sister was reading at the age of three because all the rest of the family were reading. My own son has learning difficulties so he didn't read and write till he was at school and I remember it being hard going. It still is. Most European countries start formal education much later than we do yet other countries seem to "hothouse" kids into learning at a very early age. Is there any evidence as to which system benefits the child long term?
Sweden lead the literacy tables in Europe. Despite children starting formal education 2 years later than those in the UK.
This is what confuses me. We seem to put so much emphasis on early learning but I'm not sure it really makes any difference. I was wondering if there was definitive proof it works.
#10
my lad who is now grown up had reader rabbit computer programmes , he loved it and enjoyed games like collecting letters and picking out words , i didnt buy it as a formal learning tool but he definately learned and grew interested in words and letters,
i think kids learn through play and if two can marry all the better imo
#11
suezygirl
my lad who is now grown up had reader rabbit computer programmes , he loved it and enjoyed games like collecting letters and picking out words , i didnt buy it as a formal learning tool but he definately learned and grew interested in words and letters,
i think kids learn through play and if two can marry all the better imo
I would tend to agree with you
#12
psychobitchfromhell
Just out of interest, does anyone know if starting formal education this early benefits a child? I could read at an early age and I know my younger sister was reading at the age of three because all the rest of the family were reading. My own son has learning difficulties so he didn't read and write till he was at school and I remember it being hard going. It still is. Most European countries start formal education much later than we do yet other countries seem to "hothouse" kids into learning at a very early age. Is there any evidence as to which system benefits the child long term?

I was a very bright kid, in the sense that i started to say my first words at 6 months old and was talking like an adult by the time i was two. However, i struggled at school as i found everything very confusing. I used to cry every morning when my dad took me to pre school as i hated going to school.

I didnt learn to read and write until i got to primary school and it took me a lot longer to do so than the other kids in my class. I got low grades at school and bunked off school whenever i could pretending to be ill with tummy bugs.

However, suddenly at the age of 13, everything just clicked and i became top student. Children can develop at different paces and some can start off slow but that doesn't mean that they will always continue to be slow when they grow up.

I think children should just be allowed to play until they themselves are ready to learn. Early presurrised learning does nothing except upset children who may be slow at developing at the early years.
#13
mutley1
psychobitchfromhell
Just out of interest, does anyone know if starting formal education this early benefits a child? I could read at an early age and I know my younger sister was reading at the age of three because all the rest of the family were reading. My own son has learning difficulties so he didn't read and write till he was at school and I remember it being hard going. It still is. Most European countries start formal education much later than we do yet other countries seem to "hothouse" kids into learning at a very early age. Is there any evidence as to which system benefits the child long term?
I was a very bright kid, in the sense that i started to say my first words at 6 months old and was talking like an adult by the time i was two. However, i struggled at school as i found everything very confusing. I used to cry every morning when my dad took me to pre school as i hated going to school.
I didnt learn to read and write until i got to primary school and it took me a lot longer to do so than the other kids in my class. I got low grades at school and bunked off school whenever i could pretending to be ill with tummy bugs.
However, suddenly at the age of 13, everything just clicked and i became top student. Children can develop at different paces and some can start off slow but that doesn't mean that they will always continue to be slow when they grow up.
I think children should just be allowed to play until they themselves are ready to learn. Early presurrised learning does nothing except upset children who may be slow at developing at the early years.
I think so long as learning is fun then there's no harm. Pressuring kids is surely counter productive

Post an Answer

You don't need an account to leave a response. Just enter your email address. We'll keep it private.

...OR log in with your social account

...OR comment using your social account

Thanks for your comment! Keep it up!
We just need to have a quick look and it will be live soon.
The community is happy to hear your opinion! Keep contributing!