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Limestone floor tiles kitchen - diner

£0.00 @
Looking for feedback from anyone that's got the above. Any regrets or tips?
cchopps Avatar
banned4m, 1w agoPosted 4 months, 1 week ago
Looking for feedback from anyone that's got the above.

Any regrets or tips?
cchopps Avatar
banned4m, 1w agoPosted 4 months, 1 week ago
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Best Answer
Some of these were taken not long after the floor went down (weeks) and some are this morning. Hopefully it shows that not much has changed in 11 years.

http://i66.tinypic.com/10h56pw.jpg
Today

http://i63.tinypic.com/fu0tv4.jpg
Today

http://i68.tinypic.com/241qy43.jpg
Today

http://i68.tinypic.com/25irsz8.jpg
A few weeks after fitting (when skirting was being added).

http://i68.tinypic.com/xlmp2u.jpg
A few weeks after fitting.

[IMG]http://i63.tinypic.com/180uc2.jpg[/IMG]
A few weeks after fitting.


Edited By: windym on Oct 21, 2016 09:27

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Responses/page:
#1
We have French limestone floors throughout the ground floor of our barn conversion. We converted the barn and the instal was directly onto a screed although as we have UFH we also put a decoupling membrane between the screed and the limestone.

I love our floor, it's 11 years old and still looks as good as new. It does need maintenance though. It is cleaned without any chemicals using a steam mop/cleaner. It is resealed using Lithofin products every couple of years, should probably be more than that but even with a dog and walking inside in wellies sometimes (we live in the countryside) it isn't an issue.

If you't got specific questions, fire away!
banned#2
That's fantastic. I've been advised not to use steam mop cleaner, but 11 years is good enough for me.

Are your tiles honed or tumbled (I think that's what it's called if they are not smooth), and also what colour your tiles are. I've seen white limestone but it's not advisable for kitchens.

A barn, if only. That's London living for you.
#3
I had honed in a beige colour in my kitchen and bathroom and as long as you seal them they are great as a flooring.
I resealed my yearly (easy wipe on process)

Wipe any spills up straight away and keep acid type of cleaners and excessive heat and it will last forever.
#4
Our floor is honed and is about as light as it gets. Not bright white but very light ivory.

A honed finish is less likely to attract dirt as it is smoother. Limestone is generally polished and honed. Tumbled tends to be more suited to a travertine floor. Travertine will need more attention to look after.

As for spills, if your floor is sealed correctly you don't need to 'wipe immediately' or worry. Lithofen and sealants like them are professional and will mean you don't need to worry too much. I don't wipe anything quickly. The only issue we've ever had was a cola spill that we didn't realise. It left a very minor mark initially which was removed with a deep cleaner (hand applied).

Steam is the perfect cleaner. We used a Polti for about 9 years until it died and now use a Karcher steamer from John Lewis.
#5
I can try and add some photos if that might help you decide. My best advice would be to not rush, look around and employ an experienced fitter.
banned#6
windym
Our floor is honed and is about as light as it gets. Not bright white but very light ivory.
A honed finish is less likely to attract dirt as it is smoother. Limestone is generally polished and honed. Tumbled tends to be more suited to a travertine floor. Travertine will need more attention to look after.
As for spills, if your floor is sealed correctly you don't need to 'wipe immediately' or worry. Lithofen and sealants like them are professional and will mean you don't need to worry too much. I don't wipe anything quickly. The only issue we've ever had was a cola spill that we didn't realise. It left a very minor mark initially which was removed with a deep cleaner (hand applied).
Steam is the perfect cleaner. We used a Polti for about 9 years until it died and now use a Karcher steamer from John Lewis.

I've been told a steamer will remove the sealant, but i'll listen to you. I really want as white as i can get so similar to yours. Out of interest did you consider laying tiles like pic below, i've yet to find a supplier for honed, but i'll hopefully find. I'm begining to think that the pattern below lends itself more to non-honed tiles.
http://www.metamarbleandgranite.com/images/Opus/opusexplain.jpg

I can't make up my mind. I'm looking at 20sqm. I do like 600 x 600 tiles

Edited By: cchopps on Oct 20, 2016 21:03
banned#7
windym
I can try and add some photos if that might help you decide. My best advice would be to not rush, look around and employ an experienced fitter.


I would love to see samples

Edited By: cchopps on Oct 20, 2016 21:26
#8
I will add them tomorrow, too dark now! I actually laid ours (but I'm a perfectionist and competent tiler).

I laid them in brick pattern, first row with second row offset by half a tile. All tiles the same size.

We bought ours directly from France but they've long gone out of business. A neighbour has done similar to us with a tile locally (sorry I thought it was Wickes but my OH says it was imported via a local merchant)), I will see if I can confirm what it was. Theirs have been down about 8 years.

Edited By: windym on Oct 20, 2016 22:21: Incorrect info
#9
windym
Our floor is honed and is about as light as it gets. Not bright white but very light ivory.
A honed finish is less likely to attract dirt as it is smoother. Limestone is generally polished and honed. Tumbled tends to be more suited to a travertine floor. Travertine will need more attention to look after.
As for spills, if your floor is sealed correctly you don't need to 'wipe immediately' or worry. Lithofen and sealants like them are professional and will mean you don't need to worry too much. I don't wipe anything quickly. The only issue we've ever had was a cola spill that we didn't realise. It left a very minor mark initially which was removed with a deep cleaner (hand applied).
Steam is the perfect cleaner. We used a Polti for about 9 years until it died and now use a Karcher steamer from John Lewis.

Home » Surfaces » How to Clean Limestone
How to Clean Limestone
Modified on September 8, 2016

Limestone is a sedimentary rock commonly used for flooring, wall tiles, counters, shower surfaces, and outdoor paving. While limestone can have a long, useful life (see the Great Pyramid of Giza), it is fairly soft. As such, it can be easily scratched, damaged by heat, and etched by acidic substances. Improper care and cleaning can wear on the stone, and damage may need to be professionally repaired.

Strong cleaning products that do not have a neutral pH could actually do more harm than good, as they break down the surface of limestone. Here are some easy steps on how to clean limestone. I will also include tips on preventing staining and etching, so you don’t end up making a mistake that will cost as much as your first born child to repair. Okay, I’m exaggerating, but only a little bit.
Cleaning Limestone

cleaning suppliesGather your limestone cleaning supplies. To clean limestone floors, you will need a vacuum, broom, or dry mop. You should have a sponge mop ready, too. A mild dish soap can be used for this project, but you might want to pick up a soap designed specifically for limestone. Lastly, you also need a bucket and some soft towels. Of course, if it’s time to reseal the surface, pick up some sealant, too. If you have stains on the limestone in need of removal, be sure to grab some white flour and hydrogen peroxide.
wiping down limestoneVacuum, sweep, or dry wipe the limestone surface.This may sound strange, but you can vacuum limestone floors if you turn off the spinning brush. However, be very careful that you are not scratching the surface. Vacuuming does a great job of removing sand and dirt from cracks and crevices. Otherwise, use a broom or dry mop to clean up any dirt and debris. For counters and walls, use a dry, soft cloth to remove as much dirt as you can. Any particles left on the limestone during a wet cleaning can inflict a multitude of scratches into the surface, so try to get it all.
limestone sinkWet cleaning of the limestone tile. To clean limestone, all you need is a bucket of warm water with a couple tablespoons of soap mixed in. Gently mop the stone floors, or wipe other surfaces, with the mixture. Take your time on this step, and allow ample time for the soap to break down the filth.
bag of flour and hydrogen peroxideCleaning limestone stains. Removing stains may require a poultice to draw the stain out of the stone. You can make a poultice by taking 3/4 cup of flour and adding little amounts of hydrogen peroxide until you have a paste. Apply the paste to the stain and allow it to dry, which may take as long as a day or two. Once dried, carefully remove the dried paste using a soft edged scrapper. Another option is to use a product specially made to clean and maintain limestone, like MB Stone Care MB-1 Floor Cleaner. This product is pH balanced, yet designed to remove stains and grime from stone. To be safe, find an area that no one will see and test the effect first.
dumping bucket of cleanerRinse your limestone tile. Aside from the fact that soap left on the limestone’s surface will attract dirt and speed up the accumulation of filth, it also creates a film that can leave your stone looking dull. Start by dumping out your mop bucket, rinsing it thoroughly, and refilling it with clean, warm water. Mop over the surface with the fresh water. What do you see? Any frothy, lathery sections indicate that your job is not done yet. Repeat this step until it appears that the soap residue has been eliminated.
jug of limestone sealerReapply limestone sealer as directed. Most limestone comes with a sealant on it. Over time, acidic spills and basic cleaning can wear the sealant. Reapplication can help to better protect your beautiful limestone from stains and damage. When choosing a limestone sealant, it is worth the investment to purchase one of high quality. Pick some up at your local home improvement or tile store. Consult the directions on proper application.

Limestone, Not Grimestone

Limestone can be very expensive, so you are going to want to take steps to keep it in pristine condition. Remember, babying your limestone is not an obsession but a preservation of your investment. The following tips will help you to do just that.
Use rugs to prevent some dirt, sand, and debris from being tracked on your floor.
Ask people to remove their shoes before entering a room with limestone.
Wipe up spills immediately to prevent staining.
Never use generic tile products, bathroom cleaners, glass cleaners, or abrasives to remove stains from limestone.
Sweep or dry mop on a regular basis to avoid the accumulation of damaging particulates.
#10
markvirgo
windym
Our floor is honed and is about as light as it gets. Not bright white but very light ivory.
A honed finish is less likely to attract dirt as it is smoother. Limestone is generally polished and honed. Tumbled tends to be more suited to a travertine floor. Travertine will need more attention to look after.
As for spills, if your floor is sealed correctly you don't need to 'wipe immediately' or worry. Lithofen and sealants like them are professional and will mean you don't need to worry too much. I don't wipe anything quickly. The only issue we've ever had was a cola spill that we didn't realise. It left a very minor mark initially which was removed with a deep cleaner (hand applied).
Steam is the perfect cleaner. We used a Polti for about 9 years until it died and now use a Karcher steamer from John Lewis.
Home » Surfaces » How to Clean Limestone
How to Clean Limestone
Modified on September 8, 2016
Limestone is a sedimentary rock commonly used for flooring, wall tiles, counters, shower surfaces, and outdoor paving. While limestone can have a long, useful life (see the Great Pyramid of Giza), it is fairly soft. As such, it can be easily scratched, damaged by heat, and etched by acidic substances. Improper care and cleaning can wear on the stone, and damage may need to be professionally repaired.
Strong cleaning products that do not have a neutral pH could actually do more harm than good, as they break down the surface of limestone. Here are some easy steps on how to clean limestone. I will also include tips on preventing staining and etching, so you don’t end up making a mistake that will cost as much as your first born child to repair. Okay, I’m exaggerating, but only a little bit.
Cleaning Limestone
cleaning suppliesGather your limestone cleaning supplies. To clean limestone floors, you will need a vacuum, broom, or dry mop. You should have a sponge mop ready, too. A mild dish soap can be used for this project, but you might want to pick up a soap designed specifically for limestone. Lastly, you also need a bucket and some soft towels. Of course, if it’s time to reseal the surface, pick up some sealant, too. If you have stains on the limestone in need of removal, be sure to grab some white flour and hydrogen peroxide.
wiping down limestoneVacuum, sweep, or dry wipe the limestone surface.This may sound strange, but you can vacuum limestone floors if you turn off the spinning brush. However, be very careful that you are not scratching the surface. Vacuuming does a great job of removing sand and dirt from cracks and crevices. Otherwise, use a broom or dry mop to clean up any dirt and debris. For counters and walls, use a dry, soft cloth to remove as much dirt as you can. Any particles left on the limestone during a wet cleaning can inflict a multitude of scratches into the surface, so try to get it all.
limestone sinkWet cleaning of the limestone tile. To clean limestone, all you need is a bucket of warm water with a couple tablespoons of soap mixed in. Gently mop the stone floors, or wipe other surfaces, with the mixture. Take your time on this step, and allow ample time for the soap to break down the filth.
bag of flour and hydrogen peroxideCleaning limestone stains. Removing stains may require a poultice to draw the stain out of the stone. You can make a poultice by taking 3/4 cup of flour and adding little amounts of hydrogen peroxide until you have a paste. Apply the paste to the stain and allow it to dry, which may take as long as a day or two. Once dried, carefully remove the dried paste using a soft edged scrapper. Another option is to use a product specially made to clean and maintain limestone, like MB Stone Care MB-1 Floor Cleaner. This product is pH balanced, yet designed to remove stains and grime from stone. To be safe, find an area that no one will see and test the effect first.
dumping bucket of cleanerRinse your limestone tile. Aside from the fact that soap left on the limestone’s surface will attract dirt and speed up the accumulation of filth, it also creates a film that can leave your stone looking dull. Start by dumping out your mop bucket, rinsing it thoroughly, and refilling it with clean, warm water. Mop over the surface with the fresh water. What do you see? Any frothy, lathery sections indicate that your job is not done yet. Repeat this step until it appears that the soap residue has been eliminated.
jug of limestone sealerReapply limestone sealer as directed. Most limestone comes with a sealant on it. Over time, acidic spills and basic cleaning can wear the sealant. Reapplication can help to better protect your beautiful limestone from stains and damage. When choosing a limestone sealant, it is worth the investment to purchase one of high quality. Pick some up at your local home improvement or tile store. Consult the directions on proper application.
Limestone, Not Grimestone
Limestone can be very expensive, so you are going to want to take steps to keep it in pristine condition. Remember, babying your limestone is not an obsession but a preservation of your investment. The following tips will help you to do just that.
Use rugs to prevent some dirt, sand, and debris from being tracked on your floor.
Ask people to remove their shoes before entering a room with limestone.Wipe up spills immediately to prevent staining.
Never use generic tile products, bathroom cleaners, glass cleaners, or abrasives to remove stains from limestone.
Sweep or dry mop on a regular basis to avoid the accumulation of damaging particulates.
As I said, I've had our floor down for 11 years and whilst I don't let spills fester on the floor, I don't panic and wipe things up immediately. Many a glass of wine has had a delay in being wiped up if we've been having a party! Likewise, the info also suggests you 'ask people to remove their shoes'. I have never done that and wouldn't dream of it.

Edited By: windym on Oct 21, 2016 10:24: Spelling
#11
Some of these were taken not long after the floor went down (weeks) and some are this morning. Hopefully it shows that not much has changed in 11 years.

http://i66.tinypic.com/10h56pw.jpg
Today

http://i63.tinypic.com/fu0tv4.jpg
Today

http://i68.tinypic.com/241qy43.jpg
Today

http://i68.tinypic.com/25irsz8.jpg
A few weeks after fitting (when skirting was being added).

http://i68.tinypic.com/xlmp2u.jpg
A few weeks after fitting.

[IMG]http://i63.tinypic.com/180uc2.jpg[/IMG]
A few weeks after fitting.


Edited By: windym on Oct 21, 2016 09:27
#12
Gosh, didn't expect them to be so huge. Sorry.

In the photos they look darker than in real life - think more Caribbean beach sand colour - the patterning is completely random as obviously each tile is unique. Some are darker than others but I chose to lay as they came in the pile (rather than sort into shades). When the light shines in they are very light with a slight sheen. They are great underfoot, especially in winter when the UFH kicks in.

Can't get that last one to load for some reason.

http://i63.tinypic.com/180uc2.jpg


Edited By: windym on Oct 21, 2016 09:27
banned#13
Stunning, I'm mean your home and your tiles.

Thank you so much for sharing that with me.
#14
Well, I don't know about that, but I hope it's helped. If you need any further info, although I can't match websites that give all sorts of info, I can give you the real life scenario, having lived it for so long.

Good luck with what you are doing, you won't regret it.

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