I live in a large solid internal wall bungalow, which router should I buy? - HotUKDeals
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I live in a large solid internal wall bungalow, which router should I buy?

ahmednuaman Avatar
2y, 4m agoPosted 2 years, 4 months ago
I've currently got a Cisco E4200, it's crap (both 2.4 and 5Ghz). I've also had a BT Home Hub 3 and 5, both are crap too. I tried setting up two APs at both sides and this worked for a while, but it just created problems with overlap. So I'm looking for a router that'll work with a BT infinity modem (PPPoE) with gigabit ports (bonus for homeplug out-the-box) and wide solid wifi range. Any recommendations?
ahmednuaman Avatar
2y, 4m agoPosted 2 years, 4 months ago
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Responses/page:
#1
#2
Drill a Ethernet cable through.
#3
Given the solid walls have you tried mounting a wireless receiver up high in the loft space thus getting the signal through the lat and plaster rather than the walls?

Edited By: arachnoid on Jul 12, 2014 12:21
banned#4
are you sure its the router which isn't giving out a strong enough signal and not the device/s you're trying to connect to it
#5
homeplugs if you can't sort it out. They're a godsend and cheap too.
#6
arachnoid
Given the solid walls have you tried mounting a wireless receiver up high in the loft space thus getting the signal through the lat and plaster rather than the walls?

Yep, it's about 1ft off the top of the roof.
#7
whatsThePoint
are you sure its the router which isn't giving out a strong enough signal and not the device/s you're trying to connect to it

So with all our devices (2 Androids, 1 iPhone, 1 iPod, 1 MBP, 1 iMac, 1 LGTV, 1 Roku) all drop their connection in the same blind spots. So I'm not sure what else I can do.
#8
Then it looks like you will need to use wireless powerline plugs in the black spots to improve reception
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qqjjFVxRI2Y

Edited By: arachnoid on Jul 13, 2014 10:38: update
banned#9
is the router centrally mounted in the house at the moment?
#10
Give this a go Asus RT-AC68U Wireless Broadband Router. Just upgraded to this, and the wireless range is great eats through our solid walls. Worth buying from Amazon and if it doesn't work out you can always return it within 30 days.
#11
I like to keep my bt hub close to incoming cable so output to house has always been minimal, I have an old linksys B in middle of house hardwired to router, A Belkin N150 usb wifi dongle works well on old pc. running through the linksys is a ps3, gaming pc, phones, tabs all sorts, and its donkeys years old.
#12
Broadband signal does not like solid walls, metal or water. So if it is behind any of these then the RF will struggle to get through. Even if it is behind wood because of the water content of wood. Steel reinforced walls, foil backed insulation and electrical appliances play havoc with the signal. The major players shout about how good their home WLAN routers are when really they are only good in "ideal" situations. The only way to "guarantee" a good signal is to have direct line of sight between the router and the device. Also do not forget the RF works as a two way process. It is pointless having a great "transmission" if your receive station is poor. Most popular devices have a poor antennae, which includes iPhones, Androids and tablets. Great Universal Access Points are the Ubiquiti range (google 'em). The new range of frequencies that include the AC range are claiming that the signal can penetrate walls etc better. Keywords: MIMO, Fresnel Zone, Line of Sight and Signal to Noise Ratio. This may educate you better when siting your access points. You may end up using the wireless router as a router by turning off the Wireless and routing the data through to seperate Access Points. The idea of putting the Access Point in the Attic space is also great because if it has enough power is will use the walls to bounce the signal off rather than block the signal.
#13
Do you have the 2.4 and 5Ghz both turned on at the same time? Some routers don't like it, I know ours doesn't, we use a Netgear N300 (Use 2.4Ghz only) and get a signal from the ground floor to the loft with no drop outs and 4 bar signal upstairs.
#15
I think your going to have issues with any single unit solution as there is a maximum transmission rate thats allowed by UK radio regulations and as has been stated even if the transmitter reaches the device the smaller device still has to be able to send a signal back.
#16
As above, the new BT HH5 gets excellent reviews for both range and signal attenuation - doesn't matter how strong the signal is - communication is two-way - the weedy little antenna in your phone isn't going to be able to reply regardless of whether it gets a decent signal or not.....

My advice is this - for fixed devices - hardwire it - TV, desktops, sky box, games consoles etc

You should ethernet if possible, homeplugs if not.

For mobile devices stick a separate wireless access point at strategic locations - again - if you can hardwire the access points, then do - test it with a 10m cable and an access point just trailing the cables about to find the best spots before you start drilling or lifting floor boards, you may need a couple of APs depending on the circumstances.

If all else fails, or just seems like hard work - buy a load of wireless homeplugs and stick em everywhere.

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