mobile phone blocking - HotUKDeals
We use cookie files to improve site functionality and personalisation. By continuing to use HUKD, you accept our cookie and privacy policy.
Get the HUKD app free at Google Play

Search Error

An error occurred when searching, please try again!

Login / Sign UpSubmit

mobile phone blocking

£0.00 @
as I have seen a few people asking about buying expensive used phones or say used phones in general, the main drawback is apart from a faulty phone the phone getting blocked for being reported lost or…
MynameisM Avatar
1m, 3w agoPosted 1 month, 3 weeks ago
as I have seen a few people asking about buying expensive used phones or say used phones in general, the main drawback is apart from a faulty phone the phone getting blocked for being reported lost or stolen or non payment of the contract. Does anyone actually know if a phone has been blocked once is there no legal way of getting it unblocked if not seems pretty stupid idea if it's been reported falsely surely this leads to more scams and more criminal activity or does it not by incouraging those in society whom are a bit say on the Dark side.
MynameisM Avatar
1m, 3w agoPosted 1 month, 3 weeks ago
Options

All Responses

(10) Jump to unreadPost an answer
Responses/page:
#1
No there is no Legal way.
#2
from what I understood all the UK networks collaborate and block the IEMI from the UK.
This used to just be the original network provider but later changed to all networks. Hence a high rate of mobiles still stolen are not stolen for use in the UK.

places like Checkmend will tell you whether a phone is EE-, Vodafone-, Three-, O2- or Global GSM/LTE blocked, has had multiple registered owners, has been reported stolen to the UK Police, has previously been recycled or refurbished, has been filed as part of an insurance claim or has outstanding finance on it. It will also confirm the make and model etc. Checkmend charges £1.99

best advice is don't even consider buying a phone if you suspect that the seller may report it stolen later or not pay the credit agreement..
#3
but what's the point if it just gets blocked without any action taken against the culprits I would estimate between 20 and 30 percent of phones blocked are by previous owners with fake claims. surely when proven that the phone hasn't been lost or stolen it shout be unblocked it's costing a lot of money to mobile phone companies and insurance companies as well as 2nd hand phone buyers
#4
muddassarsardar
but what's the point if it just gets blocked without any action taken against the culprits I would estimate between 20 and 30 percent of phones blocked are by previous owners with fake claims. surely when proven that the phone hasn't been lost or stolen it shout be unblocked it's costing a lot of money to mobile phone companies and insurance companies as well as 2nd hand phone buyers

from experience. i bought a phone . it got blocked. i reported it to police. and they took details down. thats it.
nothing was done about it.
#5
optimus_prime2
muddassarsardar
but what's the point if it just gets blocked without any action taken against the culprits I would estimate between 20 and 30 percent of phones blocked are by previous owners with fake claims. surely when proven that the phone hasn't been lost or stolen it shout be unblocked it's costing a lot of money to mobile phone companies and insurance companies as well as 2nd hand phone buyers

from experience. i bought a phone . it got blocked. i reported it to police. and they took details down. thats it.
nothing was done about it.


Nothing gets done because it's too much hassle. The amount of administration wouldn't benefit either the police, the insurance companies or the mobile networks. It's unfortunate but true.
#6
i never buy 2nd phones unless i completely trust that person and know them, so i can get back at them if something happens.

not worth the hassle
#7
misterleoni
optimus_prime2
muddassarsardar
but what's the point if it just gets blocked without any action taken against the culprits I would estimate between 20 and 30 percent of phones blocked are by previous owners with fake claims. surely when proven that the phone hasn't been lost or stolen it shout be unblocked it's costing a lot of money to mobile phone companies and insurance companies as well as 2nd hand phone buyers

from experience. i bought a phone . it got blocked. i reported it to police. and they took details down. thats it.
nothing was done about it.


Nothing gets done because it's too much hassle. The amount of administration wouldn't benefit either the police, the insurance companies or the mobile networks. It's unfortunate but true.


​it would benefit the latter say the phone was around 500 they do investigation they already have detials of original owner and the new owner whom presumably has proof he has paid for the item it would say insurance companies paying out another 500 for a new phone and in the long run the police would have less reports if they prosecuted those whom committted this fraud and would eventually stamp around 90 percent of these bogus claims out if more prosecutions took place. In my opinion the laws like these is why there's so many low life's as it just breeds them with easy robbery for which there's literally no deterrent.
#8
muddassarsardar
misterleoni
optimus_prime2
muddassarsardar
but what's the point if it just gets blocked without any action taken against the culprits I would estimate between 20 and 30 percent of phones blocked are by previous owners with fake claims. surely when proven that the phone hasn't been lost or stolen it shout be unblocked it's costing a lot of money to mobile phone companies and insurance companies as well as 2nd hand phone buyers

from experience. i bought a phone . it got blocked. i reported it to police. and they took details down. thats it.
nothing was done about it.


Nothing gets done because it's too much hassle. The amount of administration wouldn't benefit either the police, the insurance companies or the mobile networks. It's unfortunate but true.


​it would benefit the latter say the phone was around 500 they do investigation they already have detials of original owner and the new owner whom presumably has proof he has paid for the item it would say insurance companies paying out another 500 for a new phone and in the long run the police would have less reports if they prosecuted those whom committted this fraud and would eventually stamp around 90 percent of these bogus claims out if more prosecutions took place. In my opinion the laws like these is why there's so many low life's as it just breeds them with easy robbery for which there's literally no deterrent.


There would likely be an issue with data protection in pursuing that line of enquiry though. The person who bought the phone originally isn't necessarily the person who blocked the phone - anyone who has registered their SIM in a device could block it. If networks started these ad hoc investigations of user account activity in order to bring about 'justice' it could open a huge can of worms, legally and in terms of PR.

Much as we believe that stamping down on this would be better in the long run, the reality is that the police, insurance companies and networks know more than us about administration costs and legal implications, so if it were as simple as our theories might assume they would have already implemented these strategies. Sometimes following up on things like this is harder than we think - much of the time a transaction leading to a blocked phone is not so much a crime as a civil claim, which is why the police don't devote much time to it, and why the networks don't get involved in pursuing justice - how would they prove without doubt that the person had knowingly sold the phone and that it hadn't made their way into the other person's hands through another link? Would they try and get eBay or Gumtree to give up private user details? Often the police are only taking details as an attempt to placate the victim.
#9
well I don't really think there would be much issues about data protection as it's just details of a person whom is claiming a insurance surely they already have his details to process his claim and the person whom has the phone has given his details willingly to the police if he has bought it off say ebay and has the details of the seller anyway.I can't personally understand why it would be so difficult if u accuse anyone of any other crime the police take there time to investigate it so why not on this occasion that's what I don't seem to understand. If the phones actually were unblocked when proven that the person selling has lied it would hardly be difficult to prove this say you buy a phone off ebay all the sellers details are on there so they can see the phones been sold and not nicked If u know what I mean. I suppose the police don't take it seriously as they know the sketch anyway but it's sad still letting thieves carry on with this kind of stuff. why don't we get people claiming a second hand car has been stolen a lot more if the same thing happened with cars I'm sure a lot more people would be morti8if they were accused of knicking a car when they have bought it from the same person on the log book surely it should be treated the same way why any differnet.
#10
muddassarsardar
well I don't really think there would be much issues about data protection as it's just details of a person whom is claiming a insurance surely they already have his details to process his claim and the person whom has the phone has given his details willingly to the police if he has bought it off say ebay and has the details of the seller anyway.I can't personally understand why it would be so difficult if u accuse anyone of any other crime the police take there time to investigate it so why not on this occasion that's what I don't seem to understand. If the phones actually were unblocked when proven that the person selling has lied it would hardly be difficult to prove this say you buy a phone off ebay all the sellers details are on there so they can see the phones been sold and not nicked If u know what I mean. I suppose the police don't take it seriously as they know the sketch anyway but it's sad still letting thieves carry on with this kind of stuff. why don't we get people claiming a second hand car has been stolen a lot more if the same thing happened with cars I'm sure a lot more people would be morti8if they were accused of knicking a car when they have bought it from the same person on the log book surely it should be treated the same way why any differnet.


Data protection is a complex thing. You have to have good reason to investigate someone - a call to a network from a member of the public saying their phone is blocked is not adequate grounds for starting an investigation into someone's personal account, from a legal standpoint. You used the word 'crime'; but strictly speaking there is no crime with respect to the person who ended up with the blocked phone - this is a civil dispute that would have to be settled in a small claims court, with costs for the proceedings and the phone being obtained from the offender.

Insurance fraud is a crime but this is no business of the phone network and account information can't be arbitrarily shared with insurance companies on the assumption that a crime has been committed without firm proof and sound reason for investigation - such as warrant. The phone could have been blocked because the original buyer didn't pay their bill, or could have been blocked by someone who *bought* the phone off the original buyer, got it added to their insurance, then blocked it once sold - so a wrongly accused person could end up prosecuting both parties for sharing information they weren't entitled to share - to much publicity. You can't just access people's details and act on it willy-nilly without the authority to do so, for fear of committing criminal violations yourself. And networks have enough bad press to be getting on with

Edited By: misterleoni on Jan 03, 2017 13:52: Error

Post an Answer

You don't need an account to leave a response. Just enter your email address. We'll keep it private.

...OR log in with your social account

...OR comment using your social account

Looking for Twitter login?
Thanks for your comment! Keep it up!
We just need to have a quick look and it will be live soon.
The community is happy to hear your opinion! Keep contributing!