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Monitor advice

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Hi My son haso a high end gaming PC and just a small basic monitor. We are looking at swapping hiso monitor for a bigger higher end to replace both monitor and TV as he only watches kodi. Can… Read More
ladymarmalade Avatar
7m, 3w agoPosted 7 months, 3 weeks ago
Hi

My son haso a high end gaming PC and just a small basic monitor.

We are looking at swapping hiso monitor for a bigger higher end to replace both monitor and TV as he only watches kodi.

Can anybody recommend specs and sizes. I thought around 29-32 inch as he still needs to see it from his bed. He asked for 4k but I think that is going to be out of budget. Is 1440 144hz the next best?

I would be grateful for any help. Looking around £400 but less if possible.

Thanks in advance

Xx
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ladymarmalade Avatar
7m, 3w agoPosted 7 months, 3 weeks ago
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Best Answer
ladymarmalade
Thanks for all your advice.
He has now asked for an ultra wide screen version and looking at these they are massive due to the width when looking at a 32" so probably looking at 29".

Well bear in mind they're a different shape so the diagonal measurements aren't directly comparable. A 35" 21:9 screen has the same overall area as a 32" 16:9 screen.

ladymarmalade
Other than that I don't understand the difference between 1080 or 1440

It's the number of vertical pixels. Only quoting that figure is an affectation derived from the TV world (1080p etc.) and a puzzling one as both horizontal and vertical pixel counts matter for both gaming and other computer uses.

The total number of pixels (multiple the figures together) determines how much performance is needed to run games and for most programs and some games (such as strategy games) it determines how much stuff you can fit on screen at one time.

Common resolutions with 1080 vertical pixels are 1920x1080 and 2560x1080, while 2560x1440 and 3440x1440 are the most common resolutions that have 1440 pixels vertically.

ladymarmalade
Somebody mentioned his graphics card. It is a Nvidia GTX980ti. I don't know if this makes any difference.

It does unfortunately. nVidia currently aren't supporting the version of variable refresh rate that's part of the DisplayPort standard (called Adaptive Sync and marketed by AMD as Freesync) only their own incompatible G-sync implementation. Unfortunately if you buy a G-sync monitor it'll only ever work with nVidia cards while Adaptive Sync/Freesync will be supported by AMD, any future hardware manufacturers such as Intel and probably nVidia in a few years (they already use it in laptops).

All Responses

(11) Jump to unreadPost an answer
Responses/page:
#1
1440 and 144hz would be a good move. (I'd prefer that over 4k at 60hz)

https://www.amazon.co.uk/MG278Q-27-inch-Monitor-Display-Freesync/dp/B013FOMTV0/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1477658893&sr=8-1&keywords=144hz+1440

This looks decent value.
#2
If you want bigger than 27" & 1440p you're looking at paying £800+ for 100hz monitor.
#4
If he is watching a 30" ish from bed which I'm guessing is a good 6 feet away? 4k is a waste of time, its going to impact gaming performance for a benefit he wont see from that distance.
#5
Don't buy a gaming monitor without variable refresh rate these days. Unlike most other monitor technologies it brings benefits with no downsides.

There are some 34" and 35" 2560x1080 screens with freesync at around £300-400 that are worth a look.
#6
yes check what graphics card he has, if it's amd get a freesync, should get a 1440p 144hz somewhere, or if it's nvidia go g-sync, but you'll prob only get 1080p 144hz. most gamers are going for higher refresh rates over resolution. aoc are the budget brand, asus/Acer/dell are now premium. 27" is a good size these days
#7
Thanks for all your advice.

He has now asked for an ultra wide screen version and looking at these they are massive due to the width when looking at a 32" so probably looking at 29".

Somebody mentioned his graphics card. It is a Nvidia GTX980ti. I don't know if this makes any difference.

He also likes the curve screens but is happy with the flat if it is wide screen.

Other than that I don't understand the difference between 1080 or 1440 (which he requested when I said 4k was out of the question)

Thanks again
#8
ladymarmalade
Thanks for all your advice.
He has now asked for an ultra wide screen version and looking at these they are massive due to the width when looking at a 32" so probably looking at 29".

Well bear in mind they're a different shape so the diagonal measurements aren't directly comparable. A 35" 21:9 screen has the same overall area as a 32" 16:9 screen.

ladymarmalade
Other than that I don't understand the difference between 1080 or 1440

It's the number of vertical pixels. Only quoting that figure is an affectation derived from the TV world (1080p etc.) and a puzzling one as both horizontal and vertical pixel counts matter for both gaming and other computer uses.

The total number of pixels (multiple the figures together) determines how much performance is needed to run games and for most programs and some games (such as strategy games) it determines how much stuff you can fit on screen at one time.

Common resolutions with 1080 vertical pixels are 1920x1080 and 2560x1080, while 2560x1440 and 3440x1440 are the most common resolutions that have 1440 pixels vertically.

ladymarmalade
Somebody mentioned his graphics card. It is a Nvidia GTX980ti. I don't know if this makes any difference.

It does unfortunately. nVidia currently aren't supporting the version of variable refresh rate that's part of the DisplayPort standard (called Adaptive Sync and marketed by AMD as Freesync) only their own incompatible G-sync implementation. Unfortunately if you buy a G-sync monitor it'll only ever work with nVidia cards while Adaptive Sync/Freesync will be supported by AMD, any future hardware manufacturers such as Intel and probably nVidia in a few years (they already use it in laptops).
#9
Thanks Endless waves that explains a lot.

I've noticed many monitors do not mention gsync or freesync. If I go for one of those am I correct in thinking they work with any graphics card?

Any recommendations on a decent ultra wide screen monitor?

Thanks again

Xx

Edited By: ladymarmalade on Oct 28, 2016 21:17: Typo
#10
ladymarmalade
Thanks Endless waves that explains a lot.
I've noticed many monitors do not mention gsync or freesync. If I go for one of those am I correct in thinking they work with any graphics card?
Any recommendations on a decent ultra wide screen monitor?
Thanks again
Xx


To be able to get enhanced performance from G-Sync, you need a Geforce graphics card and G-Sync monitor. The same way Freesync works with Radeon Graphics cards.

This is a decent 34" wide monitor that has G-Sync, 1440p and 100hz

http://www.argos.co.uk/product/4611880

I didn't really shop around though, so you might find it cheaper.

Edited By: JackBauer on Oct 28, 2016 21:53
#11
ladymarmalade
Thanks Endless waves that explains a lot.
I've noticed many monitors do not mention gsync or freesync. If I go for one of those am I correct in thinking they work with any graphics card?

Any monitor will work with any graphics card, it's just that particular feature that wouldn't work if the GPU doesn't support it. If you buy a Freesync monitor for future cards then it would work perfectly fine as a standard fixed refresh rate screen on the current card just like any monitor that doesn't support the technology.

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