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PC makes room really hot when gaming.

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My gaming PC gets really hot when gaming and makes my room very stuffy. I keep a fan running in my room and the window open at all. Would a better graphics card solve the issue? Please Help! specs:… Read More
Rakib198 Avatar
8m, 6d agoPosted 8 months, 6 days ago
My gaming PC gets really hot when gaming and makes my room very stuffy. I keep a fan running in my room and the window open at all. Would a better graphics card solve the issue? Please Help!

specs:
FX6300
8gb ram
MSI 2gb 7780
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Rakib198 Avatar
8m, 6d agoPosted 8 months, 6 days ago
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Responses/page:
#1
instead of changing components why not use liquid cooling.
#2
FX6300 run fairly hot if you have the stock cooler think about fitting a liquid cooler like this one Kühler H600 Pro

amazon £42.99

http://www.antec.com/images/400/h600_03.jpg

Edited By: brianzion on Sep 14, 2016 17:27
#3
What cooling does the pc and case have? My case has 6 which keeps it all cool stable 40 degrees, also when did you last blow the dust out with compressed air?
#4
Make sure the PSU is 80+ rated, that will mean less waste heat from there.

A more recent graphics card might be able to offer the same performance at less power, or you may be able to tweak the maximum down a bit, not sure if AMD has it, but my Nvidia can be set to minimum, maximum or adaptive, and if the GPU is in adaptive, then it will not waste power when not fully stressed, but may give away a bit of performance compared to maximum - similarly, CPU power profile should be balanced.

Using water cooling will add more heat to the room, as it needs extra power for the pump.
#5
Whatever you do make sure the CPU temps aren't high as a knock on effect,and couldn't agree more with some liquid cooling temps stay good and stable continuously.PC's do exhaust heat but it sounds maybe with the level I impression to noticeably heat a room from it,then it may be backed up with dust in either or both the power supply unit and or the CPU heatsink block,if your getting major slow downs also check the bridge heating on the board isn't super hot as well as that will kill a board eventually,my advice get a ultra quiet bridge fan to cool that and no maintenance liquid cooler or the antec,as if it's the type you have to fill your self it may go forgotten and dry out causing your processor to burn out,also check the graphics card fan and radiator incase that's clogged with dust build up if anything is blocked never ever use a hoover as they are plastered in static,just use a dry unused paint brush or proper air compressor,try to avoid compressed air cans as condensation from the can can drip sometimes,which likely will short it out if undried.I am a tech if like me your brave enough and safety first oriented you could remove the cover plate on the Power supply unit to see if it is dust clogged,but do not physically touch the components with you hands,and rip out the power lead from the back and press hold the power button on the case to discharge it first,if you also try to remove the CPU cooler the heatsink from the CPU and check the thermal paste is moist not dried replace the paste if necessary,but have some paste to hand first,clean with wd40 mild amount or isopropynol.

Edited By: WIZARDZSYS on Sep 14, 2016 18:43
#6
Backbreaker79
instead of changing components why not use liquid cooling.

brianzion
FX6300 run fairly hot if you have the stock cooler think about fitting a liquid cooler like this one

Um, physics doesn't work like that. Changing the cooler has no effect on the amount of heat being emitted, only how quickly it's being transferred from the components into the air. You would have to cool the room to drop it's temperature, i.e. transfer the heat from the room to somewhere else more quickly.

Unfortunately graphics cards rather now are all rather power hungry/hot (same thing for chips) so you're not going to see any improvement over the 65-70W of your current card there.

CPUs have improved though and you could probably knock 30-40W off your power consumption (out of 150-200W total) by swapping the FX-6300 for an i3-6100 (you'd also need a new motherboard).
#7
EndlessWaves
Backbreaker79
instead of changing components why not use liquid cooling.
brianzion
FX6300 run fairly hot if you have the stock cooler think about fitting a liquid cooler like this one
Um, physics doesn't work like that. Changing the cooler has no effect on the amount of heat being emitted, only how quickly it's being transferred from the components into the air. You would have to cool the room to drop it's temperature, i.e. transfer the heat from the room to somewhere else more quickly.
Unfortunately graphics cards rather now are all rather power hungry/hot (same thing for chips) so you're not going to see any improvement over the 65-70W of your current card there.
CPUs have improved though and you could probably knock 30-40W off your power consumption (out of 150-200W total) by swapping the FX-6300 for an i3-6100 (you'd also need a new motherboard).
He remarked the PC is hot and makes the room hot,so remove the PC heat with counter measures like fans liquid cooling new thermal paste possibly repaste the GPU as well etc etc,well if you cool the PC the temps from the system lower the temps in the room therefore the room is not hot or the pc then,I fix them regular and obviously diagnose them first,so the issue as this never happens is likely physical as suggested with the build not the room,but first clearly illiminate the possibility of enviroental factor,just remove the PC from the room get a temp reading,then put the PC back in the room get a temp reading,I would say if a room is naturally exceeding a sensible room temperature then maybe just maybe it would knock effect it,the likelihood is almost none existant though,I am 6yrs commercially trained.As anyone makes mistakes I do just not often at all especially picking up on issues with laptops and desktops,I mist have diagnosed hundreds of machines and repaired them.Although I fix desktops/laptops/android tablets and TV boxes and varied mobile phones when I volunteer one day a week at the shop,the thing that always illudes me is how to prevent my punctuation taking a vacation lol.Although all we have added to the discussion apparently not sure how you'd really make it ventilate a room though you can make a diy air cooling unit using plate glass a board and plastic bottle knecks outside,question is how to redirect the cool air then from the contraption outside to inside and does it require a constant breeze and constant shade?or make the old buck ice and fan air con probably blow the water with the continuous refills and would be annoying,maybe there is another passive air con cooling method that may work for placing on a window ledge infront of an open window maybe any ideas if it's super cheap may assist in lowering that room temperature mentioned?



Edited By: WIZARDZSYS on Sep 14, 2016 19:09: edited
#8
liquid cooling and all those fans turn the heat into fairy sparkles so thats the solution
#9
chuck some ice into your fan and create a hone made air con unit. that'll cool your room down.
#10
EndlessWaves
Backbreaker79
instead of changing components why not use liquid cooling.

brianzion
FX6300 run fairly hot if you have the stock cooler think about fitting a liquid cooler like this one

Um, physics doesn't work like that. Changing the cooler has no effect on the amount of heat being emitted, only how quickly it's being transferred from the components into the air. You would have to cool the room to drop it's temperature, i.e. transfer the heat from the room to somewhere else more quickly.

Unfortunately graphics cards rather now are all rather power hungry/hot (same thing for chips) so you're not going to see any improvement over the 65-70W of your current card there.

CPUs have improved though and you could probably knock 30-40W off your power consumption (out of 150-200W total) by swapping the FX-6300 for an i3-6100 (you'd also need a new motherboard).


I mean by that comment is that liquid cooling is more efficenct than standard air cooling, thus lowering the heat temperature emitted by the fans.
#11
Backbreaker79
EndlessWaves
Backbreaker79
instead of changing components why not use liquid cooling.
brianzion
FX6300 run fairly hot if you have the stock cooler think about fitting a liquid cooler like this one
Um, physics doesn't work like that. Changing the cooler has no effect on the amount of heat being emitted, only how quickly it's being transferred from the components into the air. You would have to cool the room to drop it's temperature, i.e. transfer the heat from the room to somewhere else more quickly.
Unfortunately graphics cards rather now are all rather power hungry/hot (same thing for chips) so you're not going to see any improvement over the 65-70W of your current card there.
CPUs have improved though and you could probably knock 30-40W off your power consumption (out of 150-200W total) by swapping the FX-6300 for an i3-6100 (you'd also need a new motherboard).
I mean by that comment is that liquid cooling is more efficenct than standard air cooling, thus lowering the heat temperature emitted by the fans.
Doesn't work like that.
The pc is still giving out the same heat your just moving around where it outputs.
#12
The heat temperature?? The picture above should be enough - the heat is being being radiated remote from the CPU which may help overclocking and be a quieter solution but unless the heatsink is out the window the heat is still being dumped into the room.

Forget temperature - you want to monitor the power consumption at the wall - it will rise in game. A modern CPU uses less power than previous ones (you'll see higher core temps as they shrink) and a modern GPU uses a lot less power for the same FPS compared with even a couple of years ago.
#13
Backbreaker79
EndlessWaves
Backbreaker79
instead of changing components why not use liquid cooling.
brianzion
FX6300 run fairly hot if you have the stock cooler think about fitting a liquid cooler like this one
Um, physics doesn't work like that. Changing the cooler has no effect on the amount of heat being emitted, only how quickly it's being transferred from the components into the air. You would have to cool the room to drop it's temperature, i.e. transfer the heat from the room to somewhere else more quickly.
Unfortunately graphics cards rather now are all rather power hungry/hot (same thing for chips) so you're not going to see any improvement over the 65-70W of your current card there.
CPUs have improved though and you could probably knock 30-40W off your power consumption (out of 150-200W total) by swapping the FX-6300 for an i3-6100 (you'd also need a new motherboard).
I mean by that comment is that liquid cooling is more efficenct than standard air cooling, thus lowering the heat temperature emitted by the fans.

The air flowing out of the radiator has a lower temperature yes, but there's a greater volume of it so the overall amount of heat is the same.

Once it's mixed with the other air in the room and transferred it's heat to that there's no difference in the resulting temperature because you've got the same amount of room air and the same amount of heat going into it.

The room will continue to heat up until the heat emissions in the room (from the computer and the warm body operating it) match the heat flow out of the room.

The only way to reduce it is to either increase the heat flow out of a room (open a door/window/etc.) or reduce the amount of heat being emitted in the room. Expanding the size of the room so it takes longer to heat up would help too ;)

You may also want to look at other pieces of equipment in the room. Some older monitors used 80W+ at normal lower brightness and hit 135W at maximum while newer ones tend to top out at around 35-40W for normal brightness, with 20-25W being possible even on larger screens.
#14
Do you mean a HD 7870? That's gonna create a bit of heat for sure. My FX 6300 overclocked to 4.5GHz remains very cool whilst gaming so I suspect it's that graphics card mostly :{
#15
I just got a cylinder bin,those twist off top ones, placed a 12v fan on one side of the lid and one CPU exhaust tube vent on the other side of the lid,chucked 2 1.5L coke bottles filled with water in the freezer,I'm going to let them go rock solid frozen and bang them in the water which is filled just under half way up, and then shut all my windows and door sit back and wait and see if it works as a poor mans air con? I am doing this because I'm baking to death in the lounge all the time when it's hot outside,this is due to the insulation in the loft being recently relayed.Will let you know if it works or not,but basically so far even with a quiet fan the wind noise inside the bin bucket is annoyingly loud, but I'd rather cope with it than fry like a chip lol.It's a very crude rudimentary build,but I have h....iiigh hope I have h..iiigh hopes dun du dun dun lol.



Edited By: WIZARDZSYS on Sep 14, 2016 21:17: edited
#16
Physics is great.....some people's concept of physics is greaterer
#17
Came here to see some funny explanations of how heat 'works'. Wasn't disappointed X)
#18
josephmccowie
Came here to see some funny explanations of how heat 'works'. Wasn't disappointed X)
Haha I like watching people endlessly defend their assertion that they "know physics" and deny that the laws of thermodynamics exist.
In answer to the question, you can undervolt your CPU and GPU to very slightly reduce heat produced at source, go for a CPU and GPU with a lower process node and TDP if you can afford / want to. There is no "cheap and easy" answer.

Other than that, you can install 800 fans, a liquid cooler and seal all the holes in your case with mastic to stop the heat escaping. I personally replaced my PSU with an over-unity machine as well so it's free to run.
#19
Can't find a 7780, but a 7870 is 175W TDP (absolute maximum power).

A RX470 outperforms it, for a TDP of 120W
A RX460 underperforms it a bit, for a TDP of 75W

From the green camp:
GTX 960 outperforms, TDP 120W
GTX 950 it's close, TDP 90W
#20
My PC used to be quite cool but playing Battlefront on a 670 with 2gb it hits 74 degrees, even with fans on override and running at 100% it gets warm, roll on the winter though!
#21
josephmccowie
Came here to see some funny explanations of how heat 'works'. Wasn't disappointed X)

You're making me hot right now baby!
#22
It's ironic that people are advising liquid cooling as a fix for this guy's overheating room. Liquid cooling cools parts, but it also uses around 10-30w more than traditional cooling, which actually adds heat to the room.
#23
Okay i'm a Scientist. Here are my suggestions to each issue

1) PC get's hot - stop using the PC for long periods, add external fans around your PC ald a larger airy case.
2) Room gets hot - place your pc in a bigger room and open all windows + doors. take your clothes off and sit in ice water
#24
Well air conditioning using the method chosen ie.ice,bin,fan is [email protected] lol

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