Picking the right Shed! (for motorcycle storage) - HotUKDeals
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Picking the right Shed! (for motorcycle storage)

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Hi all, past my big bike test yesterday so need to get a decent shed ready for when I get my new bike. Never had a shed before so have no idea what to expect. I've seen a few online which are specific… Read More
Deaa Avatar
5m, 1w agoPosted 5 months, 1 week ago
Hi all, past my big bike test yesterday so need to get a decent shed ready for when I get my new bike. Never had a shed before so have no idea what to expect. I've seen a few online which are specifically for motorcycle storage but they are essentially small shipping containers and cost a fortune! they are also small where I would like something I can fit the bike in with some tools and space to move around so was hoping for some advise from some owners!
First off I'm not sure what material to go with.
From what I can see its either Metal, Plastic or Wood. Now I won't lie I'm thinking wood is going to be too much maintenance. I don't want to have to paint it every year.
I need the door to be secure, and the floor to be strong. It will be going on top of concrete flags so base should be fine.
Anyone got any ideas?
Deaa Avatar
5m, 1w agoPosted 5 months, 1 week ago
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Responses/page:
#1
you missed the 8x6 one for tesco direct the other day. I have wood shed and only painted it twice in 8 years so just find a decent company and get the shed with treated wood.
#2
justanothercid
you missed the 8x6 one for tesco direct the other day. I have wood shed and only painted it twice in 8 years so just find a decent company and get the shed with treated wood.
Ye I seen that one when it was too late!
I'm worried about wood not being strong enough as well, I'm budgeting about £500 so I'd probably spend a bit more on a wooden one than the tesco one anyway for the extra strengh. There is gonna be a bike worth around 8k inside so I don't think I should be cheeping out!
#3
what about building one out of voncerete blocks or bricks instead probably be a good alternative to the other options.
#4
MynameisM
what about building one out of voncerete blocks or bricks instead probably be a good alternative to the other options.
I did think of that but I would like to have the option to change where it is in future if I decide to re-design the garden a bit. I also don't know if i'd be up to the job! never done any sort of brick laying or block building before.
#5
It doesn't really matter what type of shed.

Some scumbag lowlife will attempt to steal your precious new bike

I would invest in making a proper base with solid, heavy anchorage (if that's the correct terminology) so that you can anchor your bike to this point with a good proper solid chain and also fit a good alarm inside and/or cctv/lighting

Doesn't matter if you live in London or similar cities or out in the country - if some likes the look of your bike they'll make an effort to follow you, find it and see how to get it.
#6
I wouldn't go for a metal one or at least one with a metal roof.
Condensation will be a nightmare!
#7
Revhead007
I wouldn't go for a metal one or at least one with a metal roof.
Condensation will be a nightmare!
Thanks that's helpful! I'm leaning towards the Keter plastic ones
#8
philphil61
It doesn't really matter what type of shed.

Some scumbag lowlife will attempt to steal your precious new bike

I would invest in making a proper base with solid, heavy anchorage (if that's the correct terminology) so that you can anchor your bike to this point with a good proper solid chain and also fit a good alarm inside and/or cctv/lighting

Doesn't matter if you live in London or similar cities or out in the country - if some likes the look of your bike they'll make an effort to follow you, find it and see how to get it.
My plan for the shed is to fit an alarm. I realise that no mater how much you secure it, if they want it they get. My plan is to make it so that requires making as much noise as possible alerting the dogs and then myself.
#9
Deaa
philphil61
It doesn't really matter what type of shed.
Some scumbag lowlife will attempt to steal your precious new bike
I would invest in making a proper base with solid, heavy anchorage (if that's the correct terminology) so that you can anchor your bike to this point with a good proper solid chain and also fit a good alarm inside and/or cctv/lighting
Doesn't matter if you live in London or similar cities or out in the country - if some likes the look of your bike they'll make an effort to follow you, find it and see how to get it.
My plan for the shed is to fit an alarm. I realise that no mater how much you secure it, if they want it they get. My plan is to make it so that requires making as much noise as possible alerting the dogs and then myself.
I hear you but I would still invest in an anchor point because they'd have to force (with potentially a lot more noise/disturbance) than simply snapping a shed lock

Please just research motorbike security options a little more.
#10
I know you opted away from the idea of using bricks but just an FYI, I had the same dilemma a couple of years ago when I passed my test.

Mine was a little easier as we already had a brick shed, however I decided to added double doors on it and now my insurance classes it as a garage and in the first year I saved £150+ on my insurance by doing so, which actually covered all the costs of the conversation.

I know it would be more for you but perhaps check your insurance quotes and see how much of a saving it would make, also what they class as a garage. It may end up paying for itself.

Also, that's some good advice above regarding security and using an anchor point.

Edited By: joshp on Feb 10, 2017 07:22
#11
philphil61
Deaa
philphil61
It doesn't really matter what type of shed.
Some scumbag lowlife will attempt to steal your precious new bike
I would invest in making a proper base with solid, heavy anchorage (if that's the correct terminology) so that you can anchor your bike to this point with a good proper solid chain and also fit a good alarm inside and/or cctv/lighting
Doesn't matter if you live in London or similar cities or out in the country - if some likes the look of your bike they'll make an effort to follow you, find it and see how to get it.
My plan for the shed is to fit an alarm. I realise that no mater how much you secure it, if they want it they get. My plan is to make it so that requires making as much noise as possible alerting the dogs and then myself.
I hear you but I would still invest in an anchor point because they'd have to force (with potentially a lot more noise/disturbance) than simply snapping a shed lock
Please just research motorbike security options a little more.
I'll take a look :)
#12
philphil61
Deaa
philphil61
It doesn't really matter what type of shed.
Some scumbag lowlife will attempt to steal your precious new bike
I would invest in making a proper base with solid, heavy anchorage (if that's the correct terminology) so that you can anchor your bike to this point with a good proper solid chain and also fit a good alarm inside and/or cctv/lighting
Doesn't matter if you live in London or similar cities or out in the country - if some likes the look of your bike they'll make an effort to follow you, find it and see how to get it.
My plan for the shed is to fit an alarm. I realise that no mater how much you secure it, if they want it they get. My plan is to make it so that requires making as much noise as possible alerting the dogs and then myself.
I hear you but I would still invest in an anchor point because they'd have to force (with potentially a lot more noise/disturbance) than simply snapping a shed lock
Please just research motorbike security options a little more.
I'll take a look :)
joshp
I know you opted away from the idea of using bricks but just an FYI, I had the same dilemma a couple of years ago when I passed my test.
Mine was a little easier as we already had a brick shed, however I decided to added double doors on it and now my insurance classes it as a garage and in the first year I saved £150+ on my insurance by doing so, which actually covered all the costs of the conversation.
I know it would be more for you but perhaps check your insurance quotes and see how much of a saving it would make, also what they class as a garage. It may end up paying for itself.
Also, that's some good advice above regarding security and using an anchor point.
I'll have a look into. I did my first few insurance quotes yesterday and they were much more than expected! i'll repeat them with a garage and see how it looks. If i'm gonna save a few hundred pounds then you might be right! thanks :)
#13
Deaa
philphil61
Deaa
philphil61
It doesn't really matter what type of shed.
Some scumbag lowlife will attempt to steal your precious new bike
I would invest in making a proper base with solid, heavy anchorage (if that's the correct terminology) so that you can anchor your bike to this point with a good proper solid chain and also fit a good alarm inside and/or cctv/lighting
Doesn't matter if you live in London or similar cities or out in the country - if some likes the look of your bike they'll make an effort to follow you, find it and see how to get it.
My plan for the shed is to fit an alarm. I realise that no mater how much you secure it, if they want it they get. My plan is to make it so that requires making as much noise as possible alerting the dogs and then myself.
I hear you but I would still invest in an anchor point because they'd have to force (with potentially a lot more noise/disturbance) than simply snapping a shed lock
Please just research motorbike security options a little more.
I'll take a look :)
joshp
I know you opted away from the idea of using bricks but just an FYI, I had the same dilemma a couple of years ago when I passed my test.
Mine was a little easier as we already had a brick shed, however I decided to added double doors on it and now my insurance classes it as a garage and in the first year I saved £150+ on my insurance by doing so, which actually covered all the costs of the conversation.
I know it would be more for you but perhaps check your insurance quotes and see how much of a saving it would make, also what they class as a garage. It may end up paying for itself.
Also, that's some good advice above regarding security and using an anchor point.
I'll have a look into. I did my first few insurance quotes yesterday and they were much more than expected! i'll repeat them with a garage and see how it looks. If i'm gonna save a few hundred pounds then you might be right! thanks :)

No problem.

Insurance was more than I expected too when I received quotes for just passing my CBT, however another tip which saved me money in the long run is that insurance is much cheaper if you complete your full license with the direct access course rather than just doing a CBT.

Not only does it mean it's permanent, because with a CBT you have to repeat it every 2 years, I also saved £200+ on my first insurance policy by completing the course. Which essentially went towards to paying for the course.

I know that means paying an initial lump sum, however within a few years they have all paid for themselves for me, now I have a my full license and a 'garage' for my bike. My second year insurance quote dropped to £195, fully comp for a £3k bike and I'm in my early 20's.

Plus you then have the option of buying a bigger bike which is another reason I opted for the above. I found my options very limited when buying a 125cc and prices seem quite high, even secondhand ones.


Edited By: joshp on Feb 10, 2017 19:25: .
#14
joshp
Deaa
philphil61
Deaa
philphil61
It doesn't really matter what type of shed.
Some scumbag lowlife will attempt to steal your precious new bike
I would invest in making a proper base with solid, heavy anchorage (if that's the correct terminology) so that you can anchor your bike to this point with a good proper solid chain and also fit a good alarm inside and/or cctv/lighting
Doesn't matter if you live in London or similar cities or out in the country - if some likes the look of your bike they'll make an effort to follow you, find it and see how to get it.
My plan for the shed is to fit an alarm. I realise that no mater how much you secure it, if they want it they get. My plan is to make it so that requires making as much noise as possible alerting the dogs and then myself.
I hear you but I would still invest in an anchor point because they'd have to force (with potentially a lot more noise/disturbance) than simply snapping a shed lock
Please just research motorbike security options a little more.
I'll take a look :)
joshp
I know you opted away from the idea of using bricks but just an FYI, I had the same dilemma a couple of years ago when I passed my test.
Mine was a little easier as we already had a brick shed, however I decided to added double doors on it and now my insurance classes it as a garage and in the first year I saved £150+ on my insurance by doing so, which actually covered all the costs of the conversation.
I know it would be more for you but perhaps check your insurance quotes and see how much of a saving it would make, also what they class as a garage. It may end up paying for itself.
Also, that's some good advice above regarding security and using an anchor point.
I'll have a look into. I did my first few insurance quotes yesterday and they were much more than expected! i'll repeat them with a garage and see how it looks. If i'm gonna save a few hundred pounds then you might be right! thanks :)
No problem.
Insurance was more than I expected too when I received quotes for just passing my CBT, however another tip which saved me money in the long run is that insurance is much cheaper if you complete your full license with the direct access course rather than just doing a CBT.
Not only does it mean it's permanent, because with a CBT you have to repeat it every 2 years, I also saved £200+ on my first insurance policy by completing the course. Which essentially went towards to paying for the course.
I know that means paying an initial lump sum, however within a few years they have all paid for themselves for me, now I have a my full license and a 'garage' for my bike. My second year insurance quote dropped to £195, fully comp for a £3k bike and I'm in my early 20's.
Plus you then have the option of buying a bigger bike which is another reason I opted for the above. I found my options very limited when buying a 125cc and prices seem quite high, even secondhand ones.
I actually just passed my DAS on Wednesday :) I've been happy to keep my 125 in the garden with a chain, disk lock and cover but now I'm looking to spend a lot more on a bike that will be more desirable I'm thinking i need to step up the security a bit!
Surprisingly Carol Nash wanted to charge me another £75 when i phoned to tell them I had passed! They were absolutely clueless but the conclusion they came to was its better to have held a CBT for 3 years than an A1 for 1 month... I said you do realise I still had my CBT for 3 years before it... idiots!
#15
Don't worry too much about the quality of the shed. Your main priority should be getting a concrete base with a good quality ground anchor buried deep within. A shed is easily broken into, no matter of the quality of it. A ground anchor with a concrete base connected is going nowhere. So long as you get a good quality chain, you'll have nothing to worry about

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