You're offered a job, they lowball you with 7k less than the market rate, how do you negotiate for a better offer? - HotUKDeals
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You're offered a job, they lowball you with 7k less than the market rate, how do you negotiate for a better offer?

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Yes, you could just walk away, try elsewhere. But what if you wanted to negotiate a better deal? What are some ways you have found to be effective? If anyone finds this thread months from now, ther… Read More
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banned3m, 1w agoPosted 3 months, 1 week ago
Yes, you could just walk away, try elsewhere. But what if you wanted to negotiate a better deal? What are some ways you have found to be effective?

If anyone finds this thread months from now, there are some amazing suggestions contained here. Hope it helps!
smiler594 Avatar
banned3m, 1w agoPosted 3 months, 1 week ago
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#1
They won't reject you if you tell them you want more, even without a reason. Their original offer will still stand. You have the perfect reason for wanting a higher pay in your title, their offer is below the market rate.

You can always of course sell yourself on a certain point, something that you can offer them. But without having any specifics it's hard to know what angle to tackle that at.
#2
mention your views on football or world conflict and hope they agree with you.
#3
you have to start at the bottom mopping floors & emptying trash then in about 5 years with your talents they'll promote you to putting all that salt on the french fries ;)
#4
Firstly be sure you are worth the market rate. Do you have all the skills, require little to no training, able to get started and be up and running quickly? Maybe they see you as someone who'll need supervision training etc to get up to speed, so offered you less. Maybe the company pays less than market rate because it can, and people still want to work there (I used to work for a company like that).

If you still think you're being undervalued, highlight areas you are strong and why you think they're under valuing you. If you've got a different offer from elsewhere you can use that as a bargaining chip, be be aware they may just tell you to take that offer.
#5
Maybe try negotiate a pay increase/review after the initial 3 months if they are happy with your progress and again after 12 bringing you up to market rate. I've been in your situation and it's comes down to proving yourself but I've always got there in the end and remember depending on the company it may make up for it in other ways turning out to be one of the best you've worked for. Good luck
banned#6
shadey12
mention your views on football or world conflict and hope they agree with you.


What's my politics got to do with my job? I'm not working as a diplomat
banned#7
DarkEnergy2012
you have to start at the bottom mopping floors & emptying trash then in about 5 years with your talents they'll promote you to putting all that salt on the french fries ;)


Thanks for the super vote of confidence DE
banned#8
Mikey_b
Firstly be sure you are worth the market rate. Do you have all the skills, require little to no training, able to get started and be up and running quickly? Maybe they see you as someone who'll need supervision training etc to get up to speed, so offered you less. Maybe the company pays less than market rate because it can, and people still want to work there (I used to work for a company like that).

If you still think you're being undervalued, highlight areas you are strong and why you think they're under valuing you. If you've got a different offer from elsewhere you can use that as a bargaining chip, be be aware they may just tell you to take that offer.


Thanks, good solid advice there
banned#9
Grumpy_womble
Maybe try negotiate a pay increase/review after the initial 3 months if they are happy with your progress and again after 12 bringing you up to market rate. I've been in your situation and it's comes down to proving yourself but I've always got there in the end and remember depending on the company it may make up for it in other ways turning out to be one of the best you've worked for. Good luck


Great idea Grumpy Womble!
#10
smiler594
shadey12
mention your views on football or world conflict and hope they agree with you.


What's my politics got to do with my job? I'm not working as a diplomat


ok, mention your outstanding work rate in the face of adversity.
#11
So how did you apply for the role? Was the salary not listed on the job spec, the offered salary will often take into account your skills and experience in doing the role, how much training etc you need. You could say that you feel the role is worth more and ask for it to be reviewed in three months?
#12
Has salary been discussed before the point of offer? Was there a salary guide during the application process?

Whenever I interview people I speak to them about their expected salary during the interview and then ask for justifications of that if required.
#13
Ask the prospective employer to indicate i) typical staff turnover rate 2) how they intend to stop staff migrating to competitors who pay £7k / year more. If they don't appear bothered by those questions, they are unlikely to ever pay your expected rate.
#14
If you are already in a job you can pick and choose. If you don't have anything at the moment then taking it on at a reasonable rate makes a lot of sense to me. As others have said you can ask for a review in 3/6 months and then decide if you want to took for something else.



Edited By: john52 on Jan 17, 2017 09:56
#15
I did what grumpy suggested, I was offered well below the normal rate even in the company at the time, I just said I felt I was worth more and that I realised they were taking a chance on that.
I told them I would want the going rate after three months probation if they decided to keep me on...they did on both counts
#16
smiler594
shadey12
mention your views on football or world conflict and hope they agree with you.
What's my politics got to do with my job? I'm not working as a diplomat

It's sarcasm, as many people in the office just talks as if they are the manager of the team they support / politicians who know every single law and route we should take as a country.
#17
Maybe you should be brave and straight up and simply ask them why they offered you 7k less.
#18
mosskeeto
I did what grumpy suggested, I was offered well below the normal rate even in the company at the time, I just said I felt I was worth more and that I realised they were taking a chance on that.
I told them I would want the going rate after three months probation if they decided to keep me on...they did on both counts

I think what grumpy said is best.
Tell them from the start the salary you want/expected, but you will take a hit for a 3 months probation period until you can prove yourself and if they want to keep you - you want the increase.

From an employers point of view it shows your willing, eager, and a reasonable person
banned#19
westy125
So how did you apply for the role? Was the salary not listed on the job spec, the offered salary will often take into account your skills and experience in doing the role, how much training etc you need. You could say that you feel the role is worth more and ask for it to be reviewed in three months?


Recommendation by friend working there, not advertised. Already in a job, but want to move to advance
banned#20
ipswich78
Has salary been discussed before the point of offer? Was there a salary guide during the application process?

Whenever I interview people I speak to them about their expected salary during the interview and then ask for justifications of that if required.



No just a bunch of interviews followed by offer letter
banned#21
AndyRoyd
Ask the prospective employer to indicate i) typical staff turnover rate 2) how they intend to stop staff migrating to competitors who pay £7k / year more. If they don't appear bothered by those questions, they are unlikely to ever pay your expected rate.


Good solid metric there. Thanks Andy
banned#22
mosskeeto
I did what grumpy suggested, I was offered well below the normal rate even in the company at the time, I just said I felt I was worth more and that I realised they were taking a chance on that.
I told them I would want the going rate after three months probation if they decided to keep me on...they did on both counts


Excellent!
#23
Tell them you've been offered a role elsewhere that is paying 7k more, but you like this company instead (flatter them) and would be willing to work for them if they match it.
#24
You tell them where you can make changes that make you appointment look cheap compared to others who couldn't make those changes but expect less salary. Never ever give them an indication that you will accept less then you are worth. It may be a one time decision but a long term struggle.
banned#25
shadey12
mention your views on football or world conflict and hope they agree with you.


If they're Arsenal supporters they can expect a healthy banter on match day
banned#26
watto1
Tell them you've been offered a role elsewhere that is paying 7k more, but you like this company instead (flatter them) and would be willing to work for them if they match it.


Nice one, might give it a try!
banned#27
PulisOut
You tell them where you can make changes that make you appointment look cheap compared to others who couldn't make those changes but expect less salary. Never ever give them an indication that you will accept less then you are worth. It may be a one time decision but a long term struggle.


Super advice there PulisOut. Thanks!
#28
Be confident. You have every right to be because you can back up your demand with data if questioned.

Look at it from their perspective. Obviously this isn't a 'McJob' where everyone who fills in an application gets told to show up tomorrow for work. I imagine that there were processes to create and advertise this position, the department had to prove they needed more people, get authorisation, there was a rigorous interview process, most likely the hiring manager had to report back and say they found someone, get approval to sign you on, etc. They have invested a lot into hiring you and they won't want to have to go back and admit that you declined because they didn't offer enough and now they have to start the process again. They've already chosen you and it's now more difficult to un-choose you. At some point they would have had to convince other people that you were 'the right person' for the job, and now they would have to backtrack on that. Put the ball back in their court in a reasonable manner, especially if not getting the job isn't the end of the world for you (you'd have declined it anyway).

A friend of mine did exactly this, went for 4-5 interviews for the same position, got offered less than what he currently makes, and basically told them no, that's not good enough, this is what I want, this is what I'm worth. He ended up getting offered a higher position and £20k more. Seriously, for a big corporation, a few thousand extra is nothing compared to the hassle and cost of having to look for 'the right person' again.
banned#29
Muir, wow your friend turned it around hugely in his favour!! Well played!

Yes, you're right. What is there to lose? I think confidence is key. Also, could ask for a pay review to market rate/my expectation in 3m if targets achieved or exceeded. Good play!
#30
smiler594
Muir, wow your friend turned it around hugely in his favour!! Well played!
Yes, you're right. What is there to lose? I think confidence is key. Also, could ask for a pay review to market rate/my expectation in 3m if targets achieved or exceeded. Good play!

The danger with that is, what happens in 3 months? What if they just... don't? Not out of malice or a deliberate attempt to be cheap, but sometimes companies (especially big ones) just don't get things done. Part of that depends on the industry of course and whether what you're asking for is common. But don't forget, in 3 months, you'll have been doing that job for 3 months. If they don't then give you what you expect, are you going to leave and write-off the 3 months you've worked there?

It's a real dangerous trap (which I've fallen into in the past), to agree to less than you want, or less than you know you're worth, because quite frankly looking for jobs is awful and people want to get it over and done with, and tell themselves they'll work really hard and get promoted and catch up quickly and soon everything will be like you want it to be. If that doesn't happen, you're going to be doubly unhappy.

Best of luck! And don't forget, most people are at a disadvantage in these negotiations because they absolutely must have the job (or have convinced themselves that they do). If you don't really need it, use that to your advantage and don't settle for less than a fair deal that you're completely happy with.
#31
Before i go for a job interview, i ask the agent how much is on offer and unless that is around or above what i am looking for, i dont bother. When i get to the interview, i always know that i have the job when they ask me how much would i be looking for as i only ever get asked this question if i am going to be offered a job, else this question doesnt come up then i know i have been unsuccessful.

When i am asked this at interview, i always quote a fixed number. And say that is what i am looking for and that is what my agent has told me would be available.

If they cant give me that figure then i walk away. I dont really negotiate as such, my negotiation tactic is stating exactly what i want. Sometimes i am fortunate enough to get an offer already with the salary i want but before i accept it, i get another interview then i play them against one another and say that i have this on the table so i would be looking for similar. I dont say i want more as that gets on the wrong side of them since
they then think you are playing games, trying to get more.

However, i know they will often offer more if they make an offer as they want you to choose them over the other and that is one sure way to get you to choose them.
banned#32
Nice play Mutley! Except this one was through a friends recommendation not an agent. At no point did they discuss money over 3 interviews and 6 people !
#33
smiler594
Nice play Mutley! Except this one was through a friends recommendation not an agent. At no point did they discuss money over 3 interviews and 6 people !

I find with employers it is very difficult to get them to offer you more money unless they really need you and you have leverage, so for example, if you already have another offer on the table and they want you to join them. Without leverage, you wont be able to get more money.

I cant see how you would be able to ask for more here once they have already given a nominal figure. It is easier to change their mind before they already have a figure in mind. Only way they are going to increase their offer will be you saying you cant accept it because you already earn more than that then they would have to match your current salary to get you to move.

I have never had a job offer without them asking me how much i am looking for, except my first job after graduation, but that may be just particular to my profession.
#34
mutley1
smiler594
Nice play Mutley! Except this one was through a friends recommendation not an agent. At no point did they discuss money over 3 interviews and 6 people !

I find with employers it is very difficult to get them to offer you more money unless they really need you and you have leverage, so for example, if you already have another offer on the table and they want you to join them. Without leverage, you wont be able to get more money.

I cant see how you would be able to ask for more here once they have already given a nominal figure. It is easier to change their mind before they already have a figure in mind. Only way they are going to increase their offer will be you saying you cant accept it because you already earn more than that then they would have to match your current salary to get you to move.

I have never had a job offer without them asking me how much i am looking for, except my first job after graduation, but that may be just particular to my profession.


sorry for being nosy but what is your profession ? i only ask as you have an agent, what are you a celeb X)
#35
jymufc
mutley1
smiler594
Nice play Mutley! Except this one was through a friends recommendation not an agent. At no point did they discuss money over 3 interviews and 6 people !
I find with employers it is very difficult to get them to offer you more money unless they really need you and you have leverage, so for example, if you already have another offer on the table and they want you to join them. Without leverage, you wont be able to get more money.
I cant see how you would be able to ask for more here once they have already given a nominal figure. It is easier to change their mind before they already have a figure in mind. Only way they are going to increase their offer will be you saying you cant accept it because you already earn more than that then they would have to match your current salary to get you to move.
I have never had a job offer without them asking me how much i am looking for, except my first job after graduation, but that may be just particular to my profession.
sorry for being nosy but what is your profession ? i only ask as you have an agent, what are you a celeb X)

I used to work in finance, now i work in tech financial software. I have always got jobs through agents. I have never approached employers direct as i find it easier to get a job through an agent as they will already know how much is on offer for a job and they have a wider market reach than me just randomly sending my cvs to employers direct.

An agent will also know when an employer needs someone whereas i wouldnt know this. I find in my profession, employers seem to be quite happy to pay agents extortionate fees to get them employees.

When i want to look around, i just send my cv to two or three agents and just sit and wait until the right opportunities comes up.

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