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Reclaimed Wood Flooring - Options?

RhysBev Avatar
2y, 3m agoPosted 2 years, 3 months ago
I'm looking for some reclaimed wood flooring, which seem to vary drastically in price. I have attached images of the look I'd like to achieve below.

Does anyone know websites / companies to go with? There seems to be laminates that offer a good resemblance, as well as vinyl tiles. Has anyone had experience with these?

I'd be happy to go with the real thing if the price isn't extortionate (i.e. over £100/m2).
RhysBev Avatar
2y, 3m agoPosted 2 years, 3 months ago
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Responses/page:
#1
http://i1327.photobucket.com/albums/u663/FlapjackOctopus/24ce3fb35369183c469e4dd7aff59b00_zps8b237062.jpg
http://i1327.photobucket.com/albums/u663/FlapjackOctopus/8b332ced7854f32c392e663e53919b19_zps0f33d854.jpg
#2
I recently had my whole house done and had looked in to "RWF".

There was some good stuff on ebay when I was looking a few months ago >>>

I recently went with real wood, click. It was the best, "cost to style/look" for us, but I suppose it depends on your type of house. If yours in the style of any of the above then it might be a good alternative.
#3
rehydrated
I recently had my whole house done and had looked in to "RWF".

There was some good stuff on ebay when I was looking a few months ago >>>

I recently went with real wood, click. It was the best, "cost to style/look" for us, but I suppose it depends on your type of house. If yours in the style of any of the above then it might be a good alternative.

Thank you for the reply, would you happen to have a website link?

Something like this...? http://www.factory-direct-flooring.co.uk/forest-drop-loc-oak-rustic-oiled-116mm-solid-wood-flooring.html

I've just been looking at vinyl with wood effect. Seems completely crazy but at the price it would cost to buy and fit, it seems like a very good option.
#4
^^ Yes, the wood in that link looks good. (better than what we got) being ex.vat, you will be nearly £30 sq. mtr. which, if you are prepared to pay, will get you some really beautiful flooring imo. (that is more than double what we paid for ours)

I am not usually a fan of B & Q but they did have a great deal on flooring when we bought ours. It is click, which we wanted, and has a "real wood top layer" which we wanted. I think they had a half price sale at the time, and they gave us an extra 10% off (special weekend deal or something, but OAP's can get this every Wednesday also I think)

My joiner uncle who fitted it was impressed with it, and it does look great.

- I think it only has a 4mm real wood top, but even this can be sanded after years to give you "new flooring" should you decide.

It depends who's fitting it, and what type of house you have. My head was busting for weeks with wood! Some will tell you real wood, some will say click, some will say engineered wood (new stuff with rel wood top layer, 1mm I think, but is industrial treated with at least a 10yr guarantee!) so there are variables.

Check B&Q, Homebase, Wickes, as they usually have deals, multi buy, offers etc.

Find a type you like, ie. click, oak. and price it. ie. £20 sq. mtr.

See if you can find same/similar on ebay

- Some sellers had packets or batches of certain wood. I emailed a few directly, and even went to see one locally, he just never had enough of what we needed. (It was beautiful 18mm oak engineered) but they will be more up for cash deals, and even on ebay will sell cheaper if you are buying a lot)

It is a brain buster! Best advice, pick a colour, pick a style/type, find lowest price - cause if you don't, nearly every wood seller you will see another one that you like!
#5
What sort of area do you have to cover with this wood ?

For £100.00 per M sq, you'd be looking at the top end, have you considered reclamation yards ?
#6
rehydrated
^^ Yes, the wood in that link looks good. (better than what we got) being ex.vat, you will be nearly £30 sq. mtr. which, if you are prepared to pay, will get you some really beautiful flooring imo. (that is more than double what we paid for ours)

I am not usually a fan of B & Q but they did have a great deal on flooring when we bought ours. It is click, which we wanted, and has a "real wood top layer" which we wanted. I think they had a half price sale at the time, and they gave us an extra 10% off (special weekend deal or something, but OAP's can get this every Wednesday also I think)

My joiner uncle who fitted it was impressed with it, and it does look great.

- I think it only has a 4mm real wood top, but even this can be sanded after years to give you "new flooring" should you decide.

It depends who's fitting it, and what type of house you have. My head was busting for weeks with wood! Some will tell you real wood, some will say click, some will say engineered wood (new stuff with rel wood top layer, 1mm I think, but is industrial treated with at least a 10yr guarantee!) so there are variables.

Check B&Q, Homebase, Wickes, as they usually have deals, multi buy, offers etc.

Find a type you like, ie. click, oak. and price it. ie. £20 sq. mtr.

See if you can find same/similar on ebay

- Some sellers had packets or batches of certain wood. I emailed a few directly, and even went to see one locally, he just never had enough of what we needed. (It was beautiful 18mm oak engineered) but they will be more up for cash deals, and even on ebay will sell cheaper if you are buying a lot)

It is a brain buster! Best advice, pick a colour, pick a style/type, find lowest price - cause if you don't, nearly every wood seller you will see another one that you like!

I too dismiss a lot of the well known companies. However I just popped into Carpet Right of all places, and they have a really interesting laminate there, with black typography on the wood effect design. Think old wine crates. I was impressed; I think it would provide a very unique look. Worked out at something like £12.99 m2.
#7
Monkeybumcheeks
What sort of area do you have to cover with this wood ?

For £100.00 per M sq, you'd be looking at the top end, have you considered reclamation yards ?

Quite a bit! 7m x 5m living room and then possibly into the kitchen. It's an old Victorian house so I thought the reclaimed wood finish would really help bring some character back. I agree £100+ is the top end, seems around £50 m2 is standard.
#8
35 sq m is a fair sized room, but I would deffo check out the yards, as they might well have a batch that fits the bill....make sure you haggle too ! ;)
#9
p.s, have a look on here.....

http://www.reclamation-yard.co.uk/category/building-materials/flooring/

This is pine, but I think it's closer to the look you're trying to achieve......@ £25.00 - £27.50 M sq

http://www.reclamation-yard.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/f812.jpg
#10
Monkeybumcheeks
p.s, have a look on here.....

http://www.reclamation-yard.co.uk/category/building-materials/flooring/

This is pine, but I think it's closer to the look you're trying to achieve......@ £25.00 - £27.50 M sq

http://www.reclamation-yard.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/f812.jpg

That looks great, I will investigate. Thank you!
#11
rehydrated
^^ Yes, the wood in that link looks good. (better than what we got) being ex.vat, you will be nearly £30 sq. mtr. which, if you are prepared to pay, will get you some really beautiful flooring imo. (that is more than double what we paid for ours)

I am not usually a fan of B & Q but they did have a great deal on flooring when we bought ours. It is click, which we wanted, and has a "real wood top layer" which we wanted. I think they had a half price sale at the time, and they gave us an extra 10% off (special weekend deal or something, but OAP's can get this every Wednesday also I think)

My joiner uncle who fitted it was impressed with it, and it does look great.

- I think it only has a 4mm real wood top, but even this can be sanded after years to give you "new flooring" should you decide.

It depends who's fitting it, and what type of house you have. My head was busting for weeks with wood! Some will tell you real wood, some will say click, some will say engineered wood (new stuff with rel wood top layer, 1mm I think, but is industrial treated with at least a 10yr guarantee!) so there are variables.

Check B&Q, Homebase, Wickes, as they usually have deals, multi buy, offers etc.

Find a type you like, ie. click, oak. and price it. ie. £20 sq. mtr.

See if you can find same/similar on ebay

- Some sellers had packets or batches of certain wood. I emailed a few directly, and even went to see one locally, he just never had enough of what we needed. (It was beautiful 18mm oak engineered) but they will be more up for cash deals, and even on ebay will sell cheaper if you are buying a lot)

It is a brain buster! Best advice, pick a colour, pick a style/type, find lowest price - cause if you don't, nearly every wood seller you will see another one that you like!

Engineered wood is what you have; the labelled wood as a veneer with a thicker plywood support layer. The veneer thickness will depend on the thickness of the whole board. A real budget board would be 10mm with a 3mm veneer, going up to 14mm / 18mm with 4 - 5mm and 21mm with 6mm. Even with a 3mm veneer it is fine to sand and re-treat the wood several times, although in my experience very few actually do it. Solid wood is simply the labelled wood all the way through.

Both can have either a tongue and groove system requiring glue or a lock system, although locking solid wood products are rare. In fact I don't think a single one of my suppliers offers a locking solid wood floor that can be fitted as a floating floor like the "Factory-Flooring" website linked in the comment before suggests. Generally speaking engineered boards are fitted as floating floors and solid wood boards are stuck down to the sub floor. This means the installation of engineered boards doesn't require much / any sub floor preparation and is easier and faster and they are highly resistant to environmental factors such as moisture, house movement etc. On the other hand this can create echo, the expansion gap will need scotia to cover it and engineered boards are usually more expensive than solid.

RhysBev
I too dismiss a lot of the well known companies. However I just popped into Carpet Right of all places, and they have a really interesting laminate there, with black typography on the wood effect design. Think old wine crates. I was impressed; I think it would provide a very unique look. Worked out at something like £12.99 m2.

I'd decide what finish you want; lacquered or oiled. Lacquer is a thick layer applied to the surface which affords decent protection but can be shiny and obscure the texture of the wood. It is designed to be permanent and last as long as the flooring. Oil is a thinner coating which doesn't give much protection but allows the surface of the wood to be clearly visible. It is not maintenance free though and will need re-treating every few years to keep the wood looking good, even with a UV set factory applied oil.

Laminate is fundamentally different to wood. Laminate is designed to be flooring and so performs extremely well; excepting heavy damage a high quality laminate will look the same as when it was laid for the life of the floor. In comparison wood flooring is a relatively soft product and will scratch, indent, fade, change colour as it is used. If that is the kind of flooring you want then laminate is no substitute, and vice versa. If you are interested in laminate, one of the largest brands of high quality laminate is Quickstep and there are many unusual designs in their portfolio. Apart from the most basically specified ranges the price will be more than £12.99 though. Don't fall into the trap of thinking that the thicker the laminate board the better it is; the key factor in longevity is the quality of the wear layer. You can buy a 12mm board at Wickes for something like £15/sqm, whereas a top end commercially rated board, designed for constant heavy wear, would never be thicker than 9mm. As with most things, you get what you pay for.

Hope this is helpful in some way.
#12
Domislice
rehydrated
^^ Yes, the wood in that link looks good. (better than what we got) being ex.vat, you will be nearly £30 sq. mtr. which, if you are prepared to pay, will get you some really beautiful flooring imo. (that is more than double what we paid for ours)

I am not usually a fan of B & Q but they did have a great deal on flooring when we bought ours. It is click, which we wanted, and has a "real wood top layer" which we wanted. I think they had a half price sale at the time, and they gave us an extra 10% off (special weekend deal or something, but OAP's can get this every Wednesday also I think)

My joiner uncle who fitted it was impressed with it, and it does look great.

- I think it only has a 4mm real wood top, but even this can be sanded after years to give you "new flooring" should you decide.

It depends who's fitting it, and what type of house you have. My head was busting for weeks with wood! Some will tell you real wood, some will say click, some will say engineered wood (new stuff with rel wood top layer, 1mm I think, but is industrial treated with at least a 10yr guarantee!) so there are variables.

Check B&Q, Homebase, Wickes, as they usually have deals, multi buy, offers etc.

Find a type you like, ie. click, oak. and price it. ie. £20 sq. mtr.

See if you can find same/similar on ebay

- Some sellers had packets or batches of certain wood. I emailed a few directly, and even went to see one locally, he just never had enough of what we needed. (It was beautiful 18mm oak engineered) but they will be more up for cash deals, and even on ebay will sell cheaper if you are buying a lot)

It is a brain buster! Best advice, pick a colour, pick a style/type, find lowest price - cause if you don't, nearly every wood seller you will see another one that you like!

Engineered wood is what you have; the labelled wood as a veneer with a thicker plywood support layer. The veneer thickness will depend on the thickness of the whole board. A real budget board would be 10mm with a 3mm veneer, going up to 14mm / 18mm with 4 - 5mm and 21mm with 6mm. Even with a 3mm veneer it is fine to sand and re-treat the wood several times, although in my experience very few actually do it. Solid wood is simply the labelled wood all the way through.

Both can have either a tongue and groove system requiring glue or a lock system, although locking solid wood products are rare. In fact I don't think a single one of my suppliers offers a locking solid wood floor that can be fitted as a floating floor like the "Factory-Flooring" website linked in the comment before suggests. Generally speaking engineered boards are fitted as floating floors and solid wood boards are stuck down to the sub floor. This means the installation of engineered boards doesn't require much / any sub floor preparation and is easier and faster and they are highly resistant to environmental factors such as moisture, house movement etc. On the other hand this can create echo, the expansion gap will need scotia to cover it and engineered boards are usually more expensive than solid.

RhysBev
I too dismiss a lot of the well known companies. However I just popped into Carpet Right of all places, and they have a really interesting laminate there, with black typography on the wood effect design. Think old wine crates. I was impressed; I think it would provide a very unique look. Worked out at something like £12.99 m2.

I'd decide what finish you want; lacquered or oiled. Lacquer is a thick layer applied to the surface which affords decent protection but can be shiny and obscure the texture of the wood. It is designed to be permanent and last as long as the flooring. Oil is a thinner coating which doesn't give much protection but allows the surface of the wood to be clearly visible. It is not maintenance free though and will need re-treating every few years to keep the wood looking good, even with a UV set factory applied oil.

Laminate is fundamentally different to wood. Laminate is designed to be flooring and so performs extremely well; excepting heavy damage a high quality laminate will look the same as when it was laid for the life of the floor. In comparison wood flooring is a relatively soft product and will scratch, indent, fade, change colour as it is used. If that is the kind of flooring you want then laminate is no substitute, and vice versa. If you are interested in laminate, one of the largest brands of high quality laminate is Quickstep and there are many unusual designs in their portfolio. Apart from the most basically specified ranges the price will be more than £12.99 though. Don't fall into the trap of thinking that the thicker the laminate board the better it is; the key factor in longevity is the quality of the wear layer. You can buy a 12mm board at Wickes for something like £15/sqm, whereas a top end commercially rated board, designed for constant heavy wear, would never be thicker than 9mm. As with most things, you get what you pay for.

Hope this is helpful in some way.

Very helpful thank you. QuickStep was one of the first brands I had been looking at. I think the best option would be to put down laminate, at least for a few years. As you say, it is a much cheaper alternative and offers the protection needed. If it does not look right / suitable then can always switch over to some form of reclaimed wooden flooring in the future. Better that way round than the other.

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