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security light

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can someone please tell me what type of wire i need for this security light http://www.homebase.co.uk/en/homebaseuk/black-400w-pir-floodlight-547097 the instructions arn't clear also what plug do i pu…
jamstaruk1972 Avatar
4m, 3w agoPosted 4 months, 3 weeks ago
can someone please tell me what type of wire i need for this security light http://www.homebase.co.uk/en/homebaseuk/black-400w-pir-floodlight-547097 the instructions arn't clear also what plug do i put at the other end 3 amp 13 amp ???
jamstaruk1972 Avatar
4m, 3w agoPosted 4 months, 3 weeks ago
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Best Answer
Some ridiculous advice.

Twin & earth into a plug-top?

5amp / 13amp fuse?

Advising a novice on electrics to add a security light onto existing lighting circuit?


OP, I'd strongly suggest you get the advice from an electrician, BUT if you insist on installing this yourself then ;

Sounds like you want this on a flexible cable supplied from a plug-top from an indoor socket? - You need to think about position of the light fitting, does your desired position allow for a route for the supply cable?

If so, I'd suggest pond cable (3183P), is better than cheaper flex (3183y) under harsh exterior conditions.
You wil also need a plug-top, these come rated at 13amps, the fuse will require changing to a 3amp

Suggestion of an in-line switch is not required IMO, simply use the rocker switch on the indoor socket should you need to switch off.

Familiarise yourself with the wiring on both the light fitting and the plug-top, think about your desired position - can the supply cable be routed safely to this position?
Connect the cable to the light fitting, then secure in chosen position.
Feed cable through chosen route to indoor socket.
Connect plug-top, remembering to change to a 3amp fuse, then test.

Connecting the plug-top last ensures there can be no chance of the plug being plugged in and switch on during installation.

Might be an idea to look at LED floodlights, much lower running costs, 20w LED should produce around the same light level as the 400w halogen, no halogen tubes to replace in future and lower running costs, but more expensive at around £20+.


Edited By: andynicol on Oct 02, 2016 15:08

All Responses

(18) Jump to unreadPost an answer
Responses/page:
#1
needs to be fed by a 1.5mm twin and earth cable. you need to connect this cable to a live and neutral feed from another light within the house
#2
sully16
needs to be fed by a 1.5mm twin and earth cable. you need to connect this cable to a live and neutral feed from another light within the house

really says mains powered in instructions and had similar in my last house and it was just wired to a plug (wasnt me that done it it was there when we bought the house)
#3
you can use pretty much anything from 1.5mm twin and earth to a flex cable (don't use thin flex cables though)

put it straight onto a plug 13A will do then put a switch in line. Easy stuff. Earth the light too.
#4
even use a 3A plug
#5
Mikeygolfgt
you can use pretty much anything from 1.5mm twin and earth to a flex cable (don't use thin flex cables though)
put it straight onto a plug 13A will do then put a switch in line. Easy stuff. Earth the light too.

thanks mike excuse my ignorance whats a switch in line?
#6
all it means by being mains powered is that it's 240v and not battery powered etc. I'd use a 3a or 5a fuse in the plug if you are going to plug it in somewhere but it is better being fed from a lighting circuit
#7
and a switch in line is just so you are feeding the switch a live and neutral which is then switching the light on and off. get a qualified electrician to do it if you're not sure.
#8
See if this helps https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dDaBkY2sS4M
plugs with 13a fuses are more common, but 3a is the correct fuse to use.
FYI, did you know you can get led and florescent bulbs for these lights
(saving you money if cats keep them on all night!)
10 watt led http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/121486604758?_trksid=p2055119.m1438.l2649&var=420422421690&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT
http://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/g6kAAOSw1DtXKvXs/s-l1600.jpg
or if you need a bit more light
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/30watt-118mm-Energy-Saving-CFL-R7-Fluorescent-Light-bulb-for-floodlights-/222245737158?hash=item33bee0d2c6:g:GBgAAOSwFe5X0-JW
http://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/GBgAAOSwFe5X0-JW/s-l500.jpg
#9
sully16
and a switch in line is just so you are feeding the switch a live and neutral which is then switching the light on and off. get a qualified electrician to do it if you're not sure.


​This mate. just means that you've got a switch that turns the light on and off. Use the normal house light switch.
#10
Some ridiculous advice.

Twin & earth into a plug-top?

5amp / 13amp fuse?

Advising a novice on electrics to add a security light onto existing lighting circuit?


OP, I'd strongly suggest you get the advice from an electrician, BUT if you insist on installing this yourself then ;

Sounds like you want this on a flexible cable supplied from a plug-top from an indoor socket? - You need to think about position of the light fitting, does your desired position allow for a route for the supply cable?

If so, I'd suggest pond cable (3183P), is better than cheaper flex (3183y) under harsh exterior conditions.
You wil also need a plug-top, these come rated at 13amps, the fuse will require changing to a 3amp

Suggestion of an in-line switch is not required IMO, simply use the rocker switch on the indoor socket should you need to switch off.

Familiarise yourself with the wiring on both the light fitting and the plug-top, think about your desired position - can the supply cable be routed safely to this position?
Connect the cable to the light fitting, then secure in chosen position.
Feed cable through chosen route to indoor socket.
Connect plug-top, remembering to change to a 3amp fuse, then test.

Connecting the plug-top last ensures there can be no chance of the plug being plugged in and switch on during installation.

Might be an idea to look at LED floodlights, much lower running costs, 20w LED should produce around the same light level as the 400w halogen, no halogen tubes to replace in future and lower running costs, but more expensive at around £20+.


Edited By: andynicol on Oct 02, 2016 15:08
#11
andynicol
Some ridiculous advice.

Twin & earth into a plug-top?

5amp / 13amp fuse?

Advising a novice on electrics to add a security light onto existing lighting circuit?


OP, I'd strongly suggest you get the advice from an electrician, BUT if you insist on installing this yourself then ;

Sounds like you want this on a flexible cable supplied from a plug-top from an indoor socket? - You need to think about position of the light fitting, does your desired position allow for a route for the supply cable?

If so, I'd suggest pond cable (3183P), is better than cheaper flex (3183y) under harsh exterior conditions.
You wil also need a plug-top, these come rated at 13amps, the fuse will require changing to a 3amp

Suggestion of an in-line switch is not required IMO, simply use the rocker switch on the indoor socket should you need to switch off.

Familiarise yourself with the wiring on both the light fitting and the plug-top, think about your desired position - can the supply cable be routed safely to this position?
Connect the cable to the light fitting, then secure in chosen position.
Feed cable through chosen route to indoor socket.
Connect plug-top, remembering to change to a 3amp fuse, then test.

Connecting the plug-top last ensures there can be no chance of the plug being plugged in and switch on during installation.

Might be an idea to look at LED floodlights, much lower running costs, 20w LED should produce around the same light level as the 400w halogen, no halogen tubes to replace in future and lower running costs, but more expensive at around £20+.



​What's the issue with getting a feed from the existing lighting circuit?
#12
sully16
andynicol
Some ridiculous advice.

Twin & earth into a plug-top?

5amp / 13amp fuse?

Advising a novice on electrics to add a security light onto existing lighting circuit?


OP, I'd strongly suggest you get the advice from an electrician, BUT if you insist on installing this yourself then ;

Sounds like you want this on a flexible cable supplied from a plug-top from an indoor socket? - You need to think about position of the light fitting, does your desired position allow for a route for the supply cable?

If so, I'd suggest pond cable (3183P), is better than cheaper flex (3183y) under harsh exterior conditions.
You wil also need a plug-top, these come rated at 13amps, the fuse will require changing to a 3amp

Suggestion of an in-line switch is not required IMO, simply use the rocker switch on the indoor socket should you need to switch off.

Familiarise yourself with the wiring on both the light fitting and the plug-top, think about your desired position - can the supply cable be routed safely to this position?
Connect the cable to the light fitting, then secure in chosen position.
Feed cable through chosen route to indoor socket.
Connect plug-top, remembering to change to a 3amp fuse, then test.

Connecting the plug-top last ensures there can be no chance of the plug being plugged in and switch on during installation.

Might be an idea to look at LED floodlights, much lower running costs, 20w LED should produce around the same light level as the 400w halogen, no halogen tubes to replace in future and lower running costs, but more expensive at around £20+.



​What's the issue with getting a feed from the existing lighting circuit?



​I can't see the problem either, surely that's how it should be done. A plug top on an indoor mains switch sounds like a right bodge.
#13
Comes across like the OP has limited electrical knowledge, unless folks are going to go into detail re adding to lighting circuit then its best not recommending it IMO.
#14
andynicol
Comes across like the OP has limited electrical knowledge, unless folks are going to go into detail re adding to lighting circuit then its best not recommending it IMO.

your right i had one in my last house that was there when i bought it it was wired up to a plug and plugged into a normal socket thought this was the norm?
#15
jamstaruk1972
andynicol
Comes across like the OP has limited electrical knowledge, unless folks are going to go into detail re adding to lighting circuit then its best not recommending it IMO.

your right i had one in my last house that was there when i bought it it was wired up to a plug and plugged into a normal socket thought this was the norm?


It's common but not IMHO the norm.

Best to wire from lighting circuit but is more complex.

Another option is to use a 3amp spur unit from the ring main.

All comes down to the application, what's safest/easiest, and more importantly what your ability allows.
#16
andynicol
jamstaruk1972
andynicol
Comes across like the OP has limited electrical knowledge, unless folks are going to go into detail re adding to lighting circuit then its best not recommending it IMO.
your right i had one in my last house that was there when i bought it it was wired up to a plug and plugged into a normal socket thought this was the norm?
It's common but not IMHO the norm.
Best to wire from lighting circuit but is more complex.
Another option is to use a 3amp spur unit from the ring main.
All comes down to the application, what's safest/easiest, and more importantly what your ability allows.
would be the only 1 my ability allowed i could do that if i knew what wire to buy.

thank you very much for taking the time to answer the plug option
#17
with things like electrical work it's best to not do it yourself if you haven't got a clue. get a qualified electrician in and pay for it to be done properly and to regs
#18
The down voting on this thread astounds me.

Can the down voters ellaborate as to the reasons for the down votes on perfectly good advice given..?

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