Am I silly to be having second thoughts? - HotUKDeals
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Am I silly to be having second thoughts?

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I've just graduated and am a new junior doctor. I had an extra weekend on my rota that was not in line with my pay so I am now being offered that extra weekend off or I can get paid £29/hour for the 2… Read More
Kazaam Avatar
9m, 2w agoPosted 9 months, 2 weeks ago
I've just graduated and am a new junior doctor. I had an extra weekend on my rota that was not in line with my pay so I am now being offered that extra weekend off or I can get paid £29/hour for the 29 hours (fri evening, sat all day and sunday all day). If I don't do it then they will ask a colleague of mine to volunteer to locum at that weekend.

I really appreciate my time off but could do with money to pay off my 'medium'-term loans. Am I daft to think about this? I don't know what a good hourly rate is. Any docs here?

Anyone know how it would get taxed?
Kazaam Avatar
9m, 2w agoPosted 9 months, 2 weeks ago
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banned#1
Hi Kaz...depends if you are happy doing a weekend which are harder work?
#2
You aren't on the Junior Doctor Contract Forum thread on Facebook? That is definitely the best place to ask this.

In short - you don't have to cover the entire weekend or a single shift. You can cover half a shift. You can also politely decline £29/hour and - if nobody else wants the shift for £29/hour - they will ask you again at even shorter notice if the shift is still not covered.

There's been discussion on this on that Facebook group but you'll have to do a lot of thread scrolling - as strikes are going to be in September - announced today.

£25-£30 an hour is ball park for weekend or OOH for F1. However if it's doing on-call OOH and weekend combined in a shift, I know some expect a higher hourly wage for it.

P.S. You in the Wessex region? I'm a med student :p

P.S.S. You need any agreed rate to be emailed to you. Or if you agree to do the shift, email to accept the shift clearly stating the hourly rate. So many F1s/2s do the shift and all record of any agreed price is denied & they pay much lower. Get it, somehow, recorded.




Edited By: Firefly1 on Aug 11, 2016 21:30: .
#3
money is not everything, go out and enjoy your time off.
#4
If you don't want to do it I'll cover for you mate
#5
ScubaDudes
If you don't want to do it I'll cover for you mate

Once you get your GMC number ;) Join the queue!
#6
Firefly1
ScubaDudes
If you don't want to do it I'll cover for you mate
Once you get your GMC number ;) Join the queue!

Is that available on ebay?.
#7
Firefly1
ScubaDudes
Firefly1
ScubaDudes
If you don't want to do it I'll cover for you mate
Once you get your GMC number ;) Join the queue!
Is that available on ebay?.
The going price of a GMC number is 5 years of work & £60,000 tuition loans. So maybe £150,000 as time=money?
Don't forget fees though. Damn those pesky Ebay fees.
Or you could buy one in India for less than £100!

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-india-medicine-education-specialrepor-idUSKBN0OW1NM20150617
#8
Firefly1
You aren't on the Junior Doctor Contract Forum thread on Facebook? That is definitely the best place to ask this.
In short - you don't have to cover the entire weekend or a single shift. You can cover half a shift. You can also politely decline £29/hour and - if nobody else wants the shift for £29/hour - they will ask you again at even shorter notice if the shift is still not covered.
There's been discussion on this on that Facebook group but you'll have to do a lot of thread scrolling - as strikes are going to be in September - announced today.
£25-£30 an hour is ball park for weekend or OOH for F1. However if it's doing on-call OOH and weekend combined in a shift, I know some expect a higher hourly wage for it.
P.S. You in the Wessex region? I'm a med student :p
P.S.S. You need any agreed rate to be emailed to you. Or if you agree to do the shift, email to accept the shift clearly stating the hourly rate. So many F1s/2s do the shift and all record of any agreed price is denied & they pay much lower. Get it, somehow, recorded.
Good idea. Will get it in writing before I was to go ahead.

I'm not complaining or moaning about the money but at the same time I need to find out if I am being offered an appropriate and fair amount for my level and hours worked. And I haven't striked...and the strike genuinely isn't about just money. Doctors work hard, as do those in many other professions. But when training posts are being cut (so less doctors) and the government demand a full 7 day service, with the same number of doctors, well...it isn't very safe.

There's a way to say things. Bless you Phil :)

Edit: Just seen Phil's new comments. You have some serious anger issues, may I refer you to the psychiatric liaison team who will diagnose you, and hopefully get you on the mend? Cheers. But seriously, stop with all the swearing and immaturity dude, grow up and have a sensible adult conversation like the rest of us. Clearly, spending money on an education has had its desired effects on certain people here, shame the same can't be said about you.

This is HotUKDeals but I have posted in the Ask section, not the deals section.

Also, it is human nature to err and make mistakes. Doctors are not immune to tiredness, being overworked or making mistakes. Even the best prepared and trained doctors make mistakes. If we were all told we aren't fit for work due to making a mistake, well, lets just say there wouldn't be anyone left working...




Edited By: Kazaam on Aug 11, 2016 22:06: .
#9
if op can't decide to work or not on a weekend because unsure of what their job should pay, then really don't want you as my doctor and think you need to get off a deals site and go and learn more about your chosen profession.
Maybe you should decide if you need a rest or can gain more experience, maybe even help a few people rather than if you can get as much dosh as possible
#10
joker
#11
Oh where's Phil gone, I was loving his comments, ok maybe worded badly but he had got a valid point!
#12
elliott1982
if op can't decide to work or not on a weekend because unsure of what their job should pay, then really don't want you as my doctor and think you need to get off a deals site and go and learn more about your chosen profession.
Maybe you should decide if you need a rest or can gain more experience, maybe even help a few people rather than if you can get as much dosh as possible


Totally agree
#13
Am i missing something here £29 per hour and ur not sure?
#14
elliott1982
if op can't decide to work or not on a weekend because unsure of what their job should pay, then really don't want you as my doctor and think you need to get off a deals site and go and learn more about your chosen profession.
Maybe you should decide if you need a rest or can gain more experience, maybe even help a few people rather than if you can get as much dosh as possible
It's a profession in which we go into with altruistic intentions, true. BUT at the same time we need to have time to socialise, spend time with family and friends, have breaks, and at the end of the day we all need money to survive. I know that the patients will receive the care, whether by me or a colleague. It comes down to ensuring patient safety firstly, so if I knew I was the only option, I wouldn't even think about it, then I need to consider whether I need the weekend off to recharge, then I need to ask myself if I need/want the money and if so, whether or not the rate being offered is appropriate. Unfortunately, the NHS is run as a business, and therefore we doctors can't ignore that fact and be taken advantage of, not that I believe that is the case here.

I understand where you're coming from but it's easy to look at it from an isolated perspective of just that weekend but I don't see that, I see my full rota, with many weekends where I am working 12 hours shifts as well as many weekdays where I will probably not get home until after 10pm and will be up in the morning at 6am to get back to work.

Any doctor who says money isn't somewhat of a motivating factor is lying. Humanitarian work by doctors is a different story but here everyone is in it for something and that doesn't mean putting patients first doesn't come at the top of the priority list.

I had a patient deteriorate today toward the end of my shift and I managed to stabilise her, had she not gotten better, I would have happily stayed behind and wouldn't have given a second thought about today's plans, money or how much I overstayed.

Please don't question my intentions. But I see where you're coming from and appreciate your honesty :) and I mean that, I am not just paying lip-service.

Perhaps this wasn't the best place to post. lol. But you seem a polite bunch (bar one), even if end up disagreeing.

Edited By: Kazaam on Aug 11, 2016 22:21
#15
Kazaam
elliott1982
if op can't decide to work or not on a weekend because unsure of what their job should pay, then really don't want you as my doctor and think you need to get off a deals site and go and learn more about your chosen profession.
Maybe you should decide if you need a rest or can gain more experience, maybe even help a few people rather than if you can get as much dosh as possible
It's a profession in which we go into with altruistic intentions, true. BUT at the same time we need to have time to socialise, spend time with family and friends, have breaks, and at the end of the day we all need money to survive. I know that the patients will receive the care, whether by me or a colleague. It comes down to ensuring patient safety firstly, so if I knew I was the only option, I wouldn't even think about it, then I need to consider whether I need the weekend off to recharge, then I need to ask myself if I need/want the money and if so, whether or not the rate being offered is appropriate. Unfortunately, the NHS is run as a business, and therefore we doctors can't ignore that fact and be taken advantage of, not that I believe that is the case here.

I understand where you're coming from but it's easy to look at it from an isolated perspective of just that weekend but I don't see that, I see my full rota, with many weekends where I am working 12 hours shifts as well as many weekdays where I will probably not get home until after 10pm and will be up in the morning at 6am to get back to work.

Any doctor who says money isn't somewhat of a motivating factor is lying. Humanitarian work by doctors is a different story but here everyone is in it for something and that doesn't mean putting patients first doesn't come at the top of the priority list.

I had a patient deteriorate today toward the end of my shift and I managed to stabilise her, had she not gotten better, I would have happily stayed behind and wouldn't have given a second thought about today's plans, money or how much I overstayed.

Please don't question my intentions. But I see where you're coming from and appreciate your honesty :) and I mean that, I am not just paying lip-service.

Perhaps this wasn't the best place to post. lol. But you seem a polite bunch (bar one), even if end up disagreeing.


I'm sorry to say but I guess your referring to "Phil" who was a wee bit negative in his response... I do agree with what he said (although not worded well)
#16
m4rky2011
Kazaam
elliott1982
if op can't decide to work or not on a weekend because unsure of what their job should pay, then really don't want you as my doctor and think you need to get off a deals site and go and learn more about your chosen profession.
Maybe you should decide if you need a rest or can gain more experience, maybe even help a few people rather than if you can get as much dosh as possible
It's a profession in which we go into with altruistic intentions, true. BUT at the same time we need to have time to socialise, spend time with family and friends, have breaks, and at the end of the day we all need money to survive. I know that the patients will receive the care, whether by me or a colleague. It comes down to ensuring patient safety firstly, so if I knew I was the only option, I wouldn't even think about it, then I need to consider whether I need the weekend off to recharge, then I need to ask myself if I need/want the money and if so, whether or not the rate being offered is appropriate. Unfortunately, the NHS is run as a business, and therefore we doctors can't ignore that fact and be taken advantage of, not that I believe that is the case here.
I understand where you're coming from but it's easy to look at it from an isolated perspective of just that weekend but I don't see that, I see my full rota, with many weekends where I am working 12 hours shifts as well as many weekdays where I will probably not get home until after 10pm and will be up in the morning at 6am to get back to work.
Any doctor who says money isn't somewhat of a motivating factor is lying. Humanitarian work by doctors is a different story but here everyone is in it for something and that doesn't mean putting patients first doesn't come at the top of the priority list.
I had a patient deteriorate today toward the end of my shift and I managed to stabilise her, had she not gotten better, I would have happily stayed behind and wouldn't have given a second thought about today's plans, money or how much I overstayed.
Please don't question my intentions. But I see where you're coming from and appreciate your honesty :) and I mean that, I am not just paying lip-service.
Perhaps this wasn't the best place to post. lol. But you seem a polite bunch (bar one), even if end up disagreeing.
I'm sorry to say but I guess your referring to "Phil" who was a wee bit negative in his response... I do agree with what he said (although not worded well)
He misconstrued my question, and portrayed it as moaning/complaining which it certainly is not. There's a difference to be pointed out between asking whether something is appropriate and asking for genuine advice regarding time off which you can't really put a price tag on, and saying that the pay is too little, which I have at no point stated explicitly although some may interpret it implicitly from my post.

Consultants get paid £50-£130 per hour for locums. Glad I am not asking about the upper end of that haha!
#17
m4rky2011
Kazaam
elliott1982
if op can't decide to work or not on a weekend because unsure of what their job should pay, then really don't want you as my doctor and think you need to get off a deals site and go and learn more about your chosen profession.
Maybe you should decide if you need a rest or can gain more experience, maybe even help a few people rather than if you can get as much dosh as possible
It's a profession in which we go into with altruistic intentions, true. BUT at the same time we need to have time to socialise, spend time with family and friends, have breaks, and at the end of the day we all need money to survive. I know that the patients will receive the care, whether by me or a colleague. It comes down to ensuring patient safety firstly, so if I knew I was the only option, I wouldn't even think about it, then I need to consider whether I need the weekend off to recharge, then I need to ask myself if I need/want the money and if so, whether or not the rate being offered is appropriate. Unfortunately, the NHS is run as a business, and therefore we doctors can't ignore that fact and be taken advantage of, not that I believe that is the case here.
I understand where you're coming from but it's easy to look at it from an isolated perspective of just that weekend but I don't see that, I see my full rota, with many weekends where I am working 12 hours shifts as well as many weekdays where I will probably not get home until after 10pm and will be up in the morning at 6am to get back to work.
Any doctor who says money isn't somewhat of a motivating factor is lying. Humanitarian work by doctors is a different story but here everyone is in it for something and that doesn't mean putting patients first doesn't come at the top of the priority list.
I had a patient deteriorate today toward the end of my shift and I managed to stabilise her, had she not gotten better, I would have happily stayed behind and wouldn't have given a second thought about today's plans, money or how much I overstayed.
Please don't question my intentions. But I see where you're coming from and appreciate your honesty :) and I mean that, I am not just paying lip-service.
Perhaps this wasn't the best place to post. lol. But you seem a polite bunch (bar one), even if end up disagreeing.
I'm sorry to say but I guess your referring to "Phil" who was a wee bit negative in his response... I do agree with what he said (although not worded well)
He wasn't "a wee bit negative", he was outright rude and offensive. Most people would never speak like that in real life, but feel they can do so masked by their online persona.
#18
Kazaam
elliott1982
if op can't decide to work or not on a weekend because unsure of what their job should pay, then really don't want you as my doctor and think you need to get off a deals site and go and learn more about your chosen profession.
Maybe you should decide if you need a rest or can gain more experience, maybe even help a few people rather than if you can get as much dosh as possible
It's a profession in which we go into with altruistic intentions, true. BUT at the same time we need to have time to socialise, spend time with family and friends, have breaks, and at the end of the day we all need money to survive. I know that the patients will receive the care, whether by me or a colleague. It comes down to ensuring patient safety firstly, so if I knew I was the only option, I wouldn't even think about it, then I need to consider whether I need the weekend off to recharge, then I need to ask myself if I need/want the money and if so, whether or not the rate being offered is appropriate. Unfortunately, the NHS is run as a business, and therefore we doctors can't ignore that fact and be taken advantage of, not that I believe that is the case here.
I understand where you're coming from but it's easy to look at it from an isolated perspective of just that weekend but I don't see that, I see my full rota, with many weekends where I am working 12 hours shifts as well as many weekdays where I will probably not get home until after 10pm and will be up in the morning at 6am to get back to work.
Any doctor who says money isn't somewhat of a motivating factor is lying. Humanitarian work by doctors is a different story but here everyone is in it for something and that doesn't mean putting patients first doesn't come at the top of the priority list.
I had a patient deteriorate today toward the end of my shift and I managed to stabilise her, had she not gotten better, I would have happily stayed behind and wouldn't have given a second thought about today's plans, money or how much I overstayed.
Please don't question my intentions. But I see where you're coming from and appreciate your honesty :) and I mean that, I am not just paying lip-service.
Perhaps this wasn't the best place to post. lol. But you seem a polite bunch (bar one), even if end up disagreeing.
The NHS is not run as a business, the NHS Trusts are, there's a big difference.

Edited By: dcx_badass on Aug 11, 2016 23:02
#19
dcx_badass
Kazaam
elliott1982
if op can't decide to work or not on a weekend because unsure of what their job should pay, then really don't want you as my doctor and think you need to get off a deals site and go and learn more about your chosen profession.
Maybe you should decide if you need a rest or can gain more experience, maybe even help a few people rather than if you can get as much dosh as possible
It's a profession in which we go into with altruistic intentions, true. BUT at the same time we need to have time to socialise, spend time with family and friends, have breaks, and at the end of the day we all need money to survive. I know that the patients will receive the care, whether by me or a colleague. It comes down to ensuring patient safety firstly, so if I knew I was the only option, I wouldn't even think about it, then I need to consider whether I need the weekend off to recharge, then I need to ask myself if I need/want the money and if so, whether or not the rate being offered is appropriate. Unfortunately, the NHS is run as a business, and therefore we doctors can't ignore that fact and be taken advantage of, not that I believe that is the case here.
I understand where you're coming from but it's easy to look at it from an isolated perspective of just that weekend but I don't see that, I see my full rota, with many weekends where I am working 12 hours shifts as well as many weekdays where I will probably not get home until after 10pm and will be up in the morning at 6am to get back to work.
Any doctor who says money isn't somewhat of a motivating factor is lying. Humanitarian work by doctors is a different story but here everyone is in it for something and that doesn't mean putting patients first doesn't come at the top of the priority list.
I had a patient deteriorate today toward the end of my shift and I managed to stabilise her, had she not gotten better, I would have happily stayed behind and wouldn't have given a second thought about today's plans, money or how much I overstayed.
Please don't question my intentions. But I see where you're coming from and appreciate your honesty :) and I mean that, I am not just paying lip-service.
Perhaps this wasn't the best place to post. lol. But you seem a polite bunch (bar one), even if end up disagreeing.
The NHS is not run as a business, the NHS Trusts are, there's a big difference.
Good point! Thanks for pointing that out.
#20
Kazaam
dcx_badass
Kazaam
elliott1982
if op can't decide to work or not on a weekend because unsure of what their job should pay, then really don't want you as my doctor and think you need to get off a deals site and go and learn more about your chosen profession.
Maybe you should decide if you need a rest or can gain more experience, maybe even help a few people rather than if you can get as much dosh as possible
It's a profession in which we go into with altruistic intentions, true. BUT at the same time we need to have time to socialise, spend time with family and friends, have breaks, and at the end of the day we all need money to survive. I know that the patients will receive the care, whether by me or a colleague. It comes down to ensuring patient safety firstly, so if I knew I was the only option, I wouldn't even think about it, then I need to consider whether I need the weekend off to recharge, then I need to ask myself if I need/want the money and if so, whether or not the rate being offered is appropriate. Unfortunately, the NHS is run as a business, and therefore we doctors can't ignore that fact and be taken advantage of, not that I believe that is the case here.
I understand where you're coming from but it's easy to look at it from an isolated perspective of just that weekend but I don't see that, I see my full rota, with many weekends where I am working 12 hours shifts as well as many weekdays where I will probably not get home until after 10pm and will be up in the morning at 6am to get back to work.
Any doctor who says money isn't somewhat of a motivating factor is lying. Humanitarian work by doctors is a different story but here everyone is in it for something and that doesn't mean putting patients first doesn't come at the top of the priority list.
I had a patient deteriorate today toward the end of my shift and I managed to stabilise her, had she not gotten better, I would have happily stayed behind and wouldn't have given a second thought about today's plans, money or how much I overstayed.
Please don't question my intentions. But I see where you're coming from and appreciate your honesty :) and I mean that, I am not just paying lip-service.
Perhaps this wasn't the best place to post. lol. But you seem a polite bunch (bar one), even if end up disagreeing.
The NHS is not run as a business, the NHS Trusts are, there's a big difference.
Good point! Thanks for pointing that out.

I am coming into this very late and I see some posts have been deleted so I am not clear on everything.
I accept you can ask what you want here - but I do question your judgement as to whether there would/should have been better places. Such subject matter would have been better discussed amongst your colleagues either in the real or more focussed virtual world.
Would I be right in thinking you will be a member of the BMA?
Does your employer provide a way of asking these sort of questions?
I accept not everyone will be familiar with the PAYE tax system - but surely your employer would have been a better placc/person to ask.
Your hourly rates or methods of fluctuating it in certain circumstances should be laid down clearly in your contract or in personnel records. I would expect all newly graduated junior doctors to be on very similar contracts - modified perhaps depending on the branch of medicine.
I am just rather shocked that HUKD is a place such matters would be discussed but as I opened - it is a free country - you may ask your questions where ever you like.
Good Luck.
#21
My day :
Got up , quickly drank cup of tea before driving child to other side of town for activity . Drove home , picked up lodger and drove her to shops . (She can't drive ) . Went to friend and showed her how to grout tiles . Finished laying laminate floor . Picked son up from activity . Got whinged at for getting there at pre arranged time when he was early . Dropped son at home and took lodger shopping ( long story , need to furnish house for her ) . Got home , made tea . Took lodger to Ikea to buy furnishings and sofa . Got home eleven hours after first setting off . For this I got paid nothing and used my own fuel . Can I be a junior doctor ? Sounds like a walk in the park .
#22
psychobitchfromhell
My day :
Got up , quickly drank cup of tea before driving child to other side of town for activity . Drove home , picked up lodger and drove her to shops . (She can't drive ) . Went to friend and showed her how to grout tiles . Finished laying laminate floor . Picked son up from activity . Got whinged at for getting there at pre arranged time when he was early . Dropped son at home and took lodger shopping ( long story , need to furnish house for her ) . Got home , made tea . Took lodger to Ikea to buy furnishings and sofa . Got home eleven hours after first setting off . For this I got paid nothing and used my own fuel . Can I be a junior doctor ? Sounds like a walk in the park .

None of that actually happened, its all in your head. You sat in a dark room rocking backwards and forwards on a rocking chair. If you need the name of a doctor I might know one. He only charges 29 quid an hour.
#23
psychobitchfromhell
My day :
Got up , quickly drank cup of tea before driving child to other side of town for activity . Drove home , picked up lodger and drove her to shops . (She can't drive ) . Went to friend and showed her how to grout tiles . Finished laying laminate floor . Picked son up from activity . Got whinged at for getting there at pre arranged time when he was early . Dropped son at home and took lodger shopping ( long story , need to furnish house for her ) . Got home , made tea . Took lodger to Ikea to buy furnishings and sofa . Got home eleven hours after first setting off . For this I got paid nothing and used my own fuel . Can I be a junior doctor ? Sounds like a walk in the park .

None of which demands any highly trained skill or intellectual ability. 5-6 years in medical school, granted, if one would even make it there in the first instance. Being busy doesn't pay - neither does altruism judging from the tone of some comments left here.

Underappreciated is an understatement. Anyone can learn to lay tiles or drive. Become a doctor? Think not.
#24
Graham1979
psychobitchfromhell
My day :
Got up , quickly drank cup of tea before driving child to other side of town for activity . Drove home , picked up lodger and drove her to shops . (She can't drive ) . Went to friend and showed her how to grout tiles . Finished laying laminate floor . Picked son up from activity . Got whinged at for getting there at pre arranged time when he was early . Dropped son at home and took lodger shopping ( long story , need to furnish house for her ) . Got home , made tea . Took lodger to Ikea to buy furnishings and sofa . Got home eleven hours after first setting off . For this I got paid nothing and used my own fuel . Can I be a junior doctor ? Sounds like a walk in the park .
None of that actually happened, its all in your head. You sat in a dark room rocking backwards and forwards on a rocking chair. If you need the name of a doctor I might know one. He only charges 29 quid an hour.
Cheap at half the price !
#25
hukddkuh
psychobitchfromhell
My day :
Got up , quickly drank cup of tea before driving child to other side of town for activity . Drove home , picked up lodger and drove her to shops . (She can't drive ) . Went to friend and showed her how to grout tiles . Finished laying laminate floor . Picked son up from activity . Got whinged at for getting there at pre arranged time when he was early . Dropped son at home and took lodger shopping ( long story , need to furnish house for her ) . Got home , made tea . Took lodger to Ikea to buy furnishings and sofa . Got home eleven hours after first setting off . For this I got paid nothing and used my own fuel . Can I be a junior doctor ? Sounds like a walk in the park .
None of which demands any highly trained skill or intellectual ability. 5-6 years in medical school, granted, if one would even make it there in the first instance. Being busy doesn't pay - neither does altruism judging from the tone of some comments left here.

Underappreciated is an understatement. Anyone can learn to lay tiles or drive. Become a doctor? Think not.
I am by no means belittling junior doctors . They are without a doubt the backbone of our national health service and an asset to be cherished . I'm just commenting on the workload of the average rushed off their feet mother for whom the idea of a weekend off is washing and ironing school uniforms. Now there's underappreciated . As for intellectual ability , I've already been to university and I've got a degree so I guess I can tick that box insignia cum laude . Oh and yes , I can read and write in Latin as well . One thing I did learn before laying floors , grouting tiles , reading Latin and my legion other skills, is that a sentence typically requires a verb . Maybe you should check that one out before questioning someone else's intellectual ability . Judge not lest ye be judged !
#26
psychobitchfromhell
hukddkuh
psychobitchfromhell
My day :
Got up , quickly drank cup of tea before driving child to other side of town for activity . Drove home , picked up lodger and drove her to shops . (She can't drive ) . Went to friend and showed her how to grout tiles . Finished laying laminate floor . Picked son up from activity . Got whinged at for getting there at pre arranged time when he was early . Dropped son at home and took lodger shopping ( long story , need to furnish house for her ) . Got home , made tea . Took lodger to Ikea to buy furnishings and sofa . Got home eleven hours after first setting off . For this I got paid nothing and used my own fuel . Can I be a junior doctor ? Sounds like a walk in the park .
None of which demands any highly trained skill or intellectual ability. 5-6 years in medical school, granted, if one would even make it there in the first instance. Being busy doesn't pay - neither does altruism judging from the tone of some comments left here.
Underappreciated is an understatement. Anyone can learn to lay tiles or drive. Become a doctor? Think not.
I am by no means belittling junior doctors . They are without a doubt the backbone of our national health service and an asset to be cherished . I'm just commenting on the workload of the average rushed off their feet mother for whom the idea of a weekend off is washing and ironing school uniforms. Now there's underappreciated . As for intellectual ability , I've already been to university and I've got a degree so I guess I can tick that box insignia cum laude . Oh and yes , I can read and write in Latin as well . One thing I did learn before laying floors , grouting tiles , reading Latin and my legion other skills, is that a sentence typically requires a verb . Maybe you should check that one out before questioning someone else's intellectual ability . Judge not lest ye be judged !
No doubt being a mother is a full-time job in and of itself, and I think often the role mothers plat is underappreciated and taken for granted. Although mothers are obviously not paid, I do feel that there is a duty upon the children to look after their own parents when they require help and looking after. I know I certainly plan to do whatever I can to help mine. I know I can't ever repay my parents, especially my mother for her time and effort she has put into bringing me up and were it not for her I wouldn't be where I am today.

We were shown this video at our doctor induction, and it is really moving.

I also don't think the previous poster was questioning your intellectual capacity, s/he was merely stating that the jobs you listed don't require going to university for 5 years after working hard at school to get the grades to get admitted in the first place.

Could you be a junior doctor? Well, I don't see why a lot of people couldn't but until one has done the job they can't say what it is like. But it certainly isn't a walk in the park. PS it's never too late if you want to do Medicine now :p
#27
Kazaam
psychobitchfromhell
hukddkuh
psychobitchfromhell
My day :
Got up , quickly drank cup of tea before driving child to other side of town for activity . Drove home , picked up lodger and drove her to shops . (She can't drive ) . Went to friend and showed her how to grout tiles . Finished laying laminate floor . Picked son up from activity . Got whinged at for getting there at pre arranged time when he was early . Dropped son at home and took lodger shopping ( long story , need to furnish house for her ) . Got home , made tea . Took lodger to Ikea to buy furnishings and sofa . Got home eleven hours after first setting off . For this I got paid nothing and used my own fuel . Can I be a junior doctor ? Sounds like a walk in the park .
None of which demands any highly trained skill or intellectual ability. 5-6 years in medical school, granted, if one would even make it there in the first instance. Being busy doesn't pay - neither does altruism judging from the tone of some comments left here.
Underappreciated is an understatement. Anyone can learn to lay tiles or drive. Become a doctor? Think not.
I am by no means belittling junior doctors . They are without a doubt the backbone of our national health service and an asset to be cherished . I'm just commenting on the workload of the average rushed off their feet mother for whom the idea of a weekend off is washing and ironing school uniforms. Now there's underappreciated . As for intellectual ability , I've already been to university and I've got a degree so I guess I can tick that box insignia cum laude . Oh and yes , I can read and write in Latin as well . One thing I did learn before laying floors , grouting tiles , reading Latin and my legion other skills, is that a sentence typically requires a verb . Maybe you should check that one out before questioning someone else's intellectual ability . Judge not lest ye be judged !
No doubt being a mother is a full-time job in and of itself, and I think often the role mothers plat is underappreciated and taken for granted. Although mothers are obviously not paid, I do feel that there is a duty upon the children to look after their own parents when they require help and looking after. I know I certainly plan to do whatever I can to help mine. I know I can't ever repay my parents, especially my mother for her time and effort she has put into bringing me up and were it not for her I wouldn't be where I am today.
We were shown this video at our doctor induction, and it is really moving.
I also don't think the previous poster was questioning your intellectual capacity, s/he was merely stating that the jobs you listed don't require going to university for 5 years after working hard at school to get the grades to get admitted in the first place.
Could you be a junior doctor? Well, I don't see why a lot of people couldn't but until one has done the job they can't say what it is like. But it certainly isn't a walk in the park. PS it's never too late if you want to do Medicine now :p
I am a widowed single mother of a disabled child . My nearest family are 250 miles away . These are my priorities . I could walk the qualifications necessary to go to medical school but I could not spare five minutes let alone five years. My life is not how I would have chosen it but it is what it is . I added the original comment to try and lighten up what was becoming a very political and heavy thread . If people took it the wrong way , so be it . I have lived a life in academia for the last 20odd years and all I have to show for that is a bunch of obituaries clipped out of the times guardian telegraph etc . Am I bitter ? No . Am I tired ? Yes . Am I frustrated ? Possibly .
#28
Kazaam
psychobitchfromhell
hukddkuh
psychobitchfromhell
My day :
Got up , quickly drank cup of tea before driving child to other side of town for activity . Drove home , picked up lodger and drove her to shops . (She can't drive ) . Went to friend and showed her how to grout tiles . Finished laying laminate floor . Picked son up from activity . Got whinged at for getting there at pre arranged time when he was early . Dropped son at home and took lodger shopping ( long story , need to furnish house for her ) . Got home , made tea . Took lodger to Ikea to buy furnishings and sofa . Got home eleven hours after first setting off . For this I got paid nothing and used my own fuel . Can I be a junior doctor ? Sounds like a walk in the park .
None of which demands any highly trained skill or intellectual ability. 5-6 years in medical school, granted, if one would even make it there in the first instance. Being busy doesn't pay - neither does altruism judging from the tone of some comments left here.
Underappreciated is an understatement. Anyone can learn to lay tiles or drive. Become a doctor? Think not.
I am by no means belittling junior doctors . They are without a doubt the backbone of our national health service and an asset to be cherished . I'm just commenting on the workload of the average rushed off their feet mother for whom the idea of a weekend off is washing and ironing school uniforms. Now there's underappreciated . As for intellectual ability , I've already been to university and I've got a degree so I guess I can tick that box insignia cum laude . Oh and yes , I can read and write in Latin as well . One thing I did learn before laying floors , grouting tiles , reading Latin and my legion other skills, is that a sentence typically requires a verb . Maybe you should check that one out before questioning someone else's intellectual ability . Judge not lest ye be judged !
No doubt being a mother is a full-time job in and of itself, and I think often the role mothers plat is underappreciated and taken for granted. Although mothers are obviously not paid, I do feel that there is a duty upon the children to look after their own parents when they require help and looking after. I know I certainly plan to do whatever I can to help mine. I know I can't ever repay my parents, especially my mother for her time and effort she has put into bringing me up and were it not for her I wouldn't be where I am today.
We were shown this video at our doctor induction, and it is really moving.
I also don't think the previous poster was questioning your intellectual capacity, s/he was merely stating that the jobs you listed don't require going to university for 5 years after working hard at school to get the grades to get admitted in the first place.
Could you be a junior doctor? Well, I don't see why a lot of people couldn't but until one has done the job they can't say what it is like. But it certainly isn't a walk in the park. PS it's never too late if you want to do Medicine now :p
I am a widowed single mother of a disabled child . My nearest family are 250 miles away . These are my priorities . I could walk the qualifications necessary to go to medical school but I could not spare five minutes let alone five years. My life is not how I would have chosen it but it is what it is . I added the original comment to try and lighten up what was becoming a very political and heavy thread . If people took it the wrong way , so be it . I have lived a life in academia for the last 20odd years and all I have to show for that is a bunch of obituaries clipped out of the times guardian telegraph etc . Am I bitter ? No . Am I tired ? Yes . Am I frustrated ? Possibly .
#29
£29 Hr il take the money : D
#30
While we've got a doctor in the house..... Ive got a rather embarrassing problem, any chance I can pm you?.
#31
£29/hour seems quite cheap for a doctor working weekends.

I think most nurses working through an agency will earn more than that in normal hours.
#32
as you are young, i would work and get the money. always time to rest later when you've got loads of money. that's how i have viewed things, work hard while you can and are young and ambitious, then when you have accumulated some wealth, relax and take it easy while others slog on :3
#33
As an edit I earn the same as a junior doctor. Get me woooohoooo
#34
Kazaam
m4rky2011
Kazaam
elliott1982
if op can't decide to work or not on a weekend because unsure of what their job should pay, then really don't want you as my doctor and think you need to get off a deals site and go and learn more about your chosen profession.
Maybe you should decide if you need a rest or can gain more experience, maybe even help a few people rather than if you can get as much dosh as possible
It's a profession in which we go into with altruistic intentions, true. BUT at the same time we need to have time to socialise, spend time with family and friends, have breaks, and at the end of the day we all need money to survive. I know that the patients will receive the care, whether by me or a colleague. It comes down to ensuring patient safety firstly, so if I knew I was the only option, I wouldn't even think about it, then I need to consider whether I need the weekend off to recharge, then I need to ask myself if I need/want the money and if so, whether or not the rate being offered is appropriate. Unfortunately, the NHS is run as a business, and therefore we doctors can't ignore that fact and be taken advantage of, not that I believe that is the case here.
I understand where you're coming from but it's easy to look at it from an isolated perspective of just that weekend but I don't see that, I see my full rota, with many weekends where I am working 12 hours shifts as well as many weekdays where I will probably not get home until after 10pm and will be up in the morning at 6am to get back to work.
Any doctor who says money isn't somewhat of a motivating factor is lying. Humanitarian work by doctors is a different story but here everyone is in it for something and that doesn't mean putting patients first doesn't come at the top of the priority list.
I had a patient deteriorate today toward the end of my shift and I managed to stabilise her, had she not gotten better, I would have happily stayed behind and wouldn't have given a second thought about today's plans, money or how much I overstayed.
Please don't question my intentions. But I see where you're coming from and appreciate your honesty :) and I mean that, I am not just paying lip-service.
Perhaps this wasn't the best place to post. lol. But you seem a polite bunch (bar one), even if end up disagreeing.
I'm sorry to say but I guess your referring to "Phil" who was a wee bit negative in his response... I do agree with what he said (although not worded well)
He wasn't "a wee bit negative", he was outright rude and offensive. Most people would never speak like that in real life, but feel they can do so masked by their online persona.


Well I'm sorry that you found his comments so hurtful... But to be honest anyone posting anything on an unregulated forum especially the question you asked should expect a degree of anger from people aswell as others saying what you want to hear... If your not prepared for both then don't post anything in the future
#35
Ah, so most people are right then, doctors these days only in it for the money it seems, real shame.

Edited By: Daytrader on Aug 12, 2016 21:18
#36
m4rky2011
Kazaam
m4rky2011
Kazaam
elliott1982
if op can't decide to work or not on a weekend because unsure of what their job should pay, then really don't want you as my doctor and think you need to get off a deals site and go and learn more about your chosen profession.
Maybe you should decide if you need a rest or can gain more experience, maybe even help a few people rather than if you can get as much dosh as possible
It's a profession in which we go into with altruistic intentions, true. BUT at the same time we need to have time to socialise, spend time with family and friends, have breaks, and at the end of the day we all need money to survive. I know that the patients will receive the care, whether by me or a colleague. It comes down to ensuring patient safety firstly, so if I knew I was the only option, I wouldn't even think about it, then I need to consider whether I need the weekend off to recharge, then I need to ask myself if I need/want the money and if so, whether or not the rate being offered is appropriate. Unfortunately, the NHS is run as a business, and therefore we doctors can't ignore that fact and be taken advantage of, not that I believe that is the case here.
I understand where you're coming from but it's easy to look at it from an isolated perspective of just that weekend but I don't see that, I see my full rota, with many weekends where I am working 12 hours shifts as well as many weekdays where I will probably not get home until after 10pm and will be up in the morning at 6am to get back to work.
Any doctor who says money isn't somewhat of a motivating factor is lying. Humanitarian work by doctors is a different story but here everyone is in it for something and that doesn't mean putting patients first doesn't come at the top of the priority list.
I had a patient deteriorate today toward the end of my shift and I managed to stabilise her, had she not gotten better, I would have happily stayed behind and wouldn't have given a second thought about today's plans, money or how much I overstayed.
Please don't question my intentions. But I see where you're coming from and appreciate your honesty :) and I mean that, I am not just paying lip-service.
Perhaps this wasn't the best place to post. lol. But you seem a polite bunch (bar one), even if end up disagreeing.
I'm sorry to say but I guess your referring to "Phil" who was a wee bit negative in his response... I do agree with what he said (although not worded well)
He wasn't "a wee bit negative", he was outright rude and offensive. Most people would never speak like that in real life, but feel they can do so masked by their online persona.


Well I'm sorry that you found his comments so hurtful... But to be honest anyone posting anything on an unregulated forum especially the question you asked should expect a degree of anger from people aswell as others saying what you want to hear... If your not prepared for both then don't post anything in the future


people can get angry if they want. I'm not hurt because I don't place my happiness or feelings in the pockets of strangers. He stated what he felt and that's fine, but my point is there is a way to say things. others have said what he did, in a much more polite manner whilst getting the point across, and I respect their opinions even if I disagree with them. if people want to say doctors are only in it for the money, they are more than welcome. I know otherwise so such comments don't affect me.

I did anticipate that there may be such an angry response(s) and I don't see why it would prevent me from posting. we have disagreements, it's part of life but there's a way to handle disagreements and anger. each to their own.

at the end of the day, I'm not annoyed or angry with anyone (even the rude ones).. it's nice to hear what other people think, and even if it heated and even if we disagree. :)

have a good weekend everyone. :D

Edited By: Kazaam on Aug 12, 2016 21:29: .
#37
ScubaDudes
Trouble is they've reached the point where they've milked the NHS to the max and they either need to wake up or the NHS will crumble.

Junior doctors do not currently get paid for every hour they are at work - only the hours they were supposed to work. These are very different things. Almost every shift will end >30 minutes past the official end, most will be >60 minutes and some every month will be several hours. There's an incredible amount of goodwill and free labour, showing it is nothing to do with "milking the NHS" but instead huge caring about their patients.
#38
Give the doc a break. They do amazing work and should be renumerated accordingly. So long as they do they job to high standards, I couldn't care less if money was a motivation for them or not.

OP you're young so put the hours in. Plenty of time to chill later. Even if you slog it out for a few years, you'll appreciate it later.
#39
Firefly1
ScubaDudes
Trouble is they've reached the point where they've milked the NHS to the max and they either need to wake up or the NHS will crumble.
Junior doctors do not currently get paid for every hour they are at work - only the hours they were supposed to work. These are very different things. Almost every shift will end >30 minutes past the official end, most will be >60 minutes and some every month will be several hours. There's an incredible amount of goodwill and free labour, showing it is nothing to do with "milking the NHS" but instead huge caring about their patients.
I guess we'll only realise how good the NHS is after we lose it.

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