Soldering iron? 25, 30 or 40W? - HotUKDeals
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Soldering iron? 25, 30 or 40W?

rash Avatar
7y, 4m agoPosted 7 years, 4 months ago
I'm looking to buy a soldering iron as the one I got from maplins is a bit crap really, even though it was apparently reduce from 30 quid.

Anyhoo, DX have quite a few irons, but whats the difference between the different watts?

OK, they heat up quicker, and get hotter but if I'm using this to repair/solder senstive equipment 25W would be better? Or would I just have to hold the soldering iron for longer so the solder can heat up? And therefore damage the equipment?
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rash Avatar
7y, 4m agoPosted 7 years, 4 months ago
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#1
You might want to edit the OP before you get hit with a ban stick! :thumbsup:

If its for soldering and repairing sensitive equipment ie CMOS chips you need a decent quality soldering with extra low leakage, such as an Antex iron or better. Generally you don't need much wattage either, 15W is usually enough for work on modern PCBs..

The DealExtreme irons are all very cheap, I imagine there is quite a bit of current leakage so not the best for working on ICs...
banned#2
The higher the W the better..................... but it its delicate electronics and your not sure stay low.
#3
Can't be that much current leakage?

If only realy comes into play at the nanometre scales or VLSI designs? As bad as the quality maybe - the leakage current would be negligible?
#4
rash;5887723
Can't be that much current leakage?

If only realy comes into play at the nanometre scales or VLSI designs? As bad as the quality maybe - the leakage current would be negligible?


Not just VLSI, any CMOS based devices are susceptible to leakage currents, so if its for work on motherboards, console chipping etc, anything like that, you will want a decent, low wattage (under 25W) iron and probably a very fine tip. If its just used for joining cables, metalwork and things like that a larger wattage and bigger tip is fine...

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