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Stopping condensation.

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Looking for some help stopping condensation as getting it on my windows upstairs. Needs tips how to set GCH so as to get a constant temp without costing hundreds of pounds. I have GCH on a timed s…
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2y, 2m agoPosted 2 years, 2 months ago
Looking for some help stopping condensation as getting it on my windows upstairs. Needs tips how to set GCH so as to get a constant temp without costing hundreds of pounds.

I have GCH on a timed setting. I have been working long hours over Xmas so only had it on 3 short intervals each day but very hot. Starting 5-6am to warm the house when I get up, 3-4pm to warm it for when I get home and 7-9pm when I'm relaxing in the evening. Temp on thermostat was like 30 degrees. I had slightly different temp settings on different radiators throughout the house dependent upon how much I use the room.

How should I set the GCH to maintain a more constant temperature to stop condensation building up without it costing an arm and a leg

I also dry clothes on an airer downstairs but get no condensation downstairs.

I have an en suite shower room but only has a small extraction fan and the window doesn't open to get rid of the water vapour. I keep the door open into the bedroom to try dissipate it as the window in there is the worst for gathering condensation. Should I stop showering in there and just use the normal on in my bathroom or offer more ventilation by opening the window in the bedroom?

Should I have doors open to help circulate the air better? Should I keep curtains drawn or open? Open windows in the house more?

Can anyone please help.
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2y, 2m agoPosted 2 years, 2 months ago
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banned#1
you need some sort of ventilation to stop condensation, not more heat
banned#2
Having your house at a more constant temperature helps with condensation. Condensation forms usually when there is a sudden contrast/change in temperature, can form damn etc.

Perhaps you should invest in TRV's for your radiator and keep them at a low temperature of set your room thermostat to a modest, constant temperature to avoid fluctuations.
#3
Look into getting a Nuaire Dri-Master. My parents and my sister have it in their houses and say that condensation has virtually gone. It takes filtered air from the attic and blows it gently into the living space creating a constant flow so vapour doesn't get a chance to settle on cold surfaces.
#4
I got the problem in different places in the house. So I bought a dehumidifier from breath easy I think it was called. the difference is unbelievable rooms a lot warmer , but a lot of water in the dehumidifier. I paid about £125 but worth every penny.
#5
A dehumidifier would be good, in mean time turn your heating down a few degrees and keep it on longer (I've always been told it cost less to do this way) open your upstairs windows ever so slightly in morning or open the vents if you have them. I'd open your curtains too. I wouldn't bother leaving doors open as it'll be harder to heat your house up plus fire safety. These are just my personal opinions from my own experience.
#6
My thoughts on the cause are either the very inconsistent temperature via my GCH settings or the en suite shower I use which I have hot with basically no ventilation bar a tiny extraction fan as the condensation only occurs upstairs.

How can I set the GCH to provide a more constant temp without it costing an arm and a leg? 1hr on 2hrs off? Will that be super expensive?

The shower I am going to stop using and use the one in the bathroom as I can open the window to get rid of the steam to see if that works.

Any other tips? If not I will have to get a dehumidifier.
#7
pinklillypops
A dehumidifier would be good, in mean time turn your heating down a few degrees and keep it on longer (I've always been told it cost less to do this way) open your upstairs windows ever so slightly in morning or open the vents if you have them. I'd open your curtains too. I wouldn't bother leaving doors open as it'll be harder to heat your house up plus fire safety. These are just my personal opinions from my own experience.

Thank you. I shall try them all.
banned#8
you could try not breathing out to cut down on the moisture in the air
#9
I have a similar problem. I have found the best way to get rid of condensation is to keep the windows on vent as much as possible (I leave the front windows on vent all the time), leave all internal doors open to allow air circulation. Once you've had a bath/shower, close the door and let the window/extractor deal with the humidity (otherwise it will affect the rest of the house). Regarding the heating, I would keep it at a constant low temperature-about 19/20c if you can and wear a jumper and slippers if it doesn't feel warm enough without. I also have a dehumidifier which I run for about an hour 3x per week. Ebac do the best dehumidifiers in my opinion and have a good warranty if you buy from them direct. Otherwise look for used ones-not all dehumidifiers are created anywhere near equal! When you are using a dehumidifier, make sure you do the worst room first-keeping all vents and doors closed (for that room). Also remember that cooking/drying washing/ironing/breathing all make the air moist-try to give extra ventilation to the rooms that you use for these.
#10
I dont know what size your house is but I have to keep the gas central heating on 24 7 in my two bedroom flat as my health suffers if I dont. I have it set on the thermostat to 21c about 21 hours then about 18-19 when sleeping. This costs me approx 45 per month which I think is fine. I dont have the heating having to work hard at all as its always around the same temp and I never have condensation in the house. I do keep the little vents at the top of my windows open, doesnt make the place colder.
#11
Put the extractor fan on at the same time you turn on the shower and leave it running for at least 30 mins after you've showered.

Condensation will be normal to most households in the winter because less ventilation (doors/windows closed) but it also will depend on other circumstances.

If you live near a river, lake or damp area your level of condensation will be more than normal
If you dry your clothes inside (whether tumble dryer or airer)

That's the condensation sorted - now the heating
http://www.moneysavingexpert.com/utilities/energy-saving-myths

http://www.uswitch.com/energy-saving/guides/heating-on-all-the-time/
#12
I use to have the heating on a timer like yourself. My heating bills use to come quite high. Had our boiler surveyed and was told by the engineer the harder you make your boiler work the higher your bills will be. I'm not sure how true this is. However last year I compared my bills with my neighbour also very close friend who lives a few doors down. Difference being I kept my heating on all the time on a consistent temp around 21°/22°. My mate puts her heating on for short intervals 3times a day at a high temp setting. End of winter my bill was £350 and hers was £390.

After that we both stick to keeping it on at a low constant temp. Dreading this years winter bill though, God help us!!!!
#13
p.s. We only get condensation in the rooms we sleep in. No where else thank God. Sorry couldn't be of any help in that area. :-/
#14
Perhaps also worth considering a (Karcher) window vac to help deal with the condensation efficiently when it builds up (in any amount).
#15
I use those moisture absorber tubs with the crystals in... From poundland or home bargains. Has stopped the pools of water and mould I was getting on my upstairs windowsills.
banned#16
saffy_786
I use to have the heating on a timer like yourself. My heating bills use to come quite high. Had our boiler surveyed and was told by the engineer the harder you make your boiler work the higher your bills will be. I'm not sure how true this is. However last year I compared my bills with my neighbour also very close friend who lives a few doors down. Difference being I kept my heating on all the time on a consistent temp around 21°/22°. My mate puts her heating on for short intervals 3times a day at a high temp setting. End of winter my bill was £350 and hers was £390.

After that we both stick to keeping it on at a low constant temp. Dreading this years winter bill though, God help us!!!!

What boiler do you have and what boiler does she have? Yours may be more efficient than hers.
#17
Warm air carries more moisture

Warm air rises

So it's you drying your clothes causing most of the condensation upstairs

Get a tumble dryer and leave shower room for closed with the extractor fan on for at least half an hour after showering
#18
[quote=saffy_786]I use to have the heating on a timer like yourself. My heating bills use to come quite high. Had our boiler surveyed and was told by the engineer the harder you make your boiler work the higher your bills will be. I'm not sure how true this is. However last year I compared my bills with my neighbour also very close friend who lives a few doors down. Difference being I kept my heating on all the time on a consistent temp around 21°/22°. My mate puts her heating on for short intervals 3times a day at a high temp setting. End of winter my bill was £350 and hers was £390.

After that w both stick to keeping it on at a low constant temp. Dreading this 2ears winter bill though, God help us!!!! 21
#19
maxim24
saffy_786
I use to have the heating on a timer like yourself. My heating bills use to come quite high. Had our boiler surveyed and was told by the engineer the harder you make your boiler work the higher your bills will be. I'm not sure how true this is. However last year I compared my bills with my neighbour also very close friend who lives a few doors down. Difference being I kept my heating on all the time on a consistent temp around 21°/22°. My mate puts her heating on for short intervals 3times a day at a high temp setting. End of winter my bill was £350 and hers was £390.

After that we both stick to keeping it on at a low constant temp. Dreading this years winter bill though, God help us!!!!

What boiler do you have and what boiler does she have? Yours may be more efficient than hers.

We both have Vaillant boilers. Hers was installed a year after mine.
banned#20
maxim24
Having your house at a more constant temperature helps with condensation. Condensation forms usually when there is a sudden contrast/change in temperature, can form damn etc.

Perhaps you should invest in TRV's for your radiator and keep them at a low temperature of set your room thermostat to a modest, constant temperature to avoid fluctuations.


^^^^^^^ This

Couldn't have said it better myself.
#21
If your windows have trickle vents, make sure they're opened. On top of that, might be worth changing the extractor fan to a higher capacity one to extract more moist air, or even buying a decent dehumidifier.
#22
Is this whole question someone just trolling or is it me??

The OP appears to answer their own question straight after asking it!!
banned#23
saffy_786
maxim24
saffy_786
I use to have the heating on a timer like yourself. My heating bills use to come quite high. Had our boiler surveyed and was told by the engineer the harder you make your boiler work the higher your bills will be. I'm not sure how true this is. However last year I compared my bills with my neighbour also very close friend who lives a few doors down. Difference being I kept my heating on all the time on a consistent temp around 21°/22°. My mate puts her heating on for short intervals 3times a day at a high temp setting. End of winter my bill was £350 and hers was £390.

After that we both stick to keeping it on at a low constant temp. Dreading this years winter bill though, God help us!!!!

What boiler do you have and what boiler does she have? Yours may be more efficient than hers.

We both have Vaillant boilers. Hers was installed a year after mine.

Vaillant have boilers rated between A+ and D on their efficiency as defined by SEDBUK.

For the comparison to be comparable, both your and your neighbours boilers should be rated the same and have similar levels of home insulation, otherwise the results cannot really be compared.

You can see the SEDBUK rating of boilers online if you know the model numbers. Oh and your boilers should also be the same type, i.e combi or condensing combi or system.
#24
Hallsie
Is this whole question someone just trolling or is it me??
The OP appears to answer their own question straight after asking it!!

No. I know many possible causes but no idea which would cause it most severely.

Also I read all over central heating on low constantly is more expensive, but is it a drastic increase or like £10 a moth?
#25
The central heating isn't your problem here, the source and control of moisture is. Hot, moist air on a cold surface produces condensation. Removing the moisture is how you'll remove the condensation.
#26
maxim24
saffy_786
maxim24
saffy_786
I use to have the heating on a timer like yourself. My heating bills use to come quite high. Had our boiler surveyed and was told by the engineer the harder you make your boiler work the higher your bills will be. I'm not sure how true this is. However last year I compared my bills with my neighbour also very close friend who lives a few doors down. Difference being I kept my heating on all the time on a consistent temp around 21°/22°. My mate puts her heating on for short intervals 3times a day at a high temp setting. End of winter my bill was £350 and hers was £390.

After that we both stick to keeping it on at a low constant temp. Dreading this years winter bill though, God help us!!!!

What boiler do you have and what boiler does she have? Yours may be more efficient than hers.

We both have Vaillant boilers. Hers was installed a year after mine.

Vaillant have boilers rated between A+ and D on their efficiency as defined by SEDBUK.

For the comparison to be comparable, both your and your neighbours boilers should be rated the same and have similar levels of home insulation, otherwise the results cannot really be compared.

You can see the SEDBUK rating of boilers online if you know the model numbers. Oh and your boilers should also be the same type, i.e combi or condensing combi or system.

Ooh thanks for that info will look into it. ;-)

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